2016 Arena Pro Swim Series – Charlotte: Day 2 Finals Live Recap

2016 ARENA PRO SWIM SERIES – CHARLOTTE

The 2nd night at the 2016 Arena Pro Swim Series – Charlotte, and the first full night of action after distance races on Thursday, will feature 5 events for each gender, including the non-Olympic 50 backstrokes. The highlights of the evening are expected to be the women’s 100 breaststroke and 100 fly. In the former, American Record holder Lilly King and Pan Ams champion Katie Meili will lead Olympic finalist Alia Atkinson and two of Canada’s best Rachel Nicol and Kierra Smith, among a host of other stars.

WOMEN’S 200 FREESTYLE – Finals

  1. Leah Smith, Virginia – 1:57.26
  2. Taylor Ruck, Canada – 1:58.84
  3. Siobhan Haughey, Michigan – 1:58.90

After a lifetime best in prelims of the women’s 200 free, U.S. National Teamer, and University of Virginia senior-to-be, Leah Smith did so again in finals with a 1:57.26. That’s a .16 second improvement over her morning swim.

Smith has a penchant for charging hard in early heats of her races, and while that approach is overkill at a meet like this, where she would’ve finaled either way, this swim shows that she’s honing the ability to master multiple rounds – a necessity at the Olympic Trials for sure, and perhaps at the Olympic Games if its in the cards.

15-year old Canadian Taylor Ruck, who is officially a part of Canada’s Olympic Team as an alternate for the 800 free relay, but could be battling for a 400 spot as well, took 2nd in 1:58.85. That’s among her top 5 personal best times in the event.

Overall, aside form the top 2, this A-final had a very Big Ten feel to it. Three swimmers hailed from the University of Michigan (Siobhan Haughey, 3rd – 1:58.90, Rose Bi , 5th– 1:59.73, and G Ryan, 8th – 2:03.40); with Indiana postgrad Lindsay Vrooman placing 4th (1:59.65) and Ohio State post-grad Alex Norris taking 7th (2:02.32). In and among them was Smith’s Virginia teammate Jen Marrkand at 6th in 2:00.50.

National Junior Teamer and Stanford  Katie Drabot won the B-Final in 2:00.24.

MEN’S 200 FREESTYLE – Finals

  1. Conor Dwyer, Trojan – 1:46.68
  2. Zane Grothe, Badger Swim Club – 1:48.22
  3. Anders Lie Nielsen, Michigan – 1:49.18

Conor Dwyer, who’s coming down to Charlotte from an extended stay at altitude in Colorado Springs,  reaped the rewards of his time spent in the mountains. He won the men’s 200 free in 1:46.68 – a second-and-a-half clear of the field.

That time is the second-best of Dwyer’s career outside of major championship meets – with the best being his swim at the PSS stop in Mesa in April.

Zane Grothe, a contender for the American relay in this event, placed 2nd in 1:48.22, and Danish swimmer Anders Nielsen was 3rd in 1:49.18.

WOMEN’S 100 BREASTSTROKE – Finals

  1. Lilly King, Indiana – 1:05.73
  2. Katie Meili, SwimMAC – 1:06.54
  3. Alia Atkinson, Jamaica/SOFL – 1:07.81

After crushing American Records in the 100 yard and 200 yard breaststrokes at NCAAs, Lilly King knocked seven-tenths of a second from her lifetime best in long course to win in 1:05.73.

That makes her the fastest American in the event this year (half-a-second better than Molly Hannis), and #2 in the world.

2015-2016 LCM Women 100 BREAST

LillyUSA
KING
08/08
1.04.93*OR
2Yulia
EFIMOVA
RUS1.05.5008/08
3Katie
MEILI
USA1.05.6908/08
4Ruta
MEILUTYTE
LTU1.05.8203/11
5Alia
ATKINSON
JAM1.05.9311/06
View Top 26»

MEN’S 100 BREASTSTROKE – Finals

  1. Cody Miller, Badger Swim Club – 1:00.66
  2. Miguel De Lara Ojda, Mexico – 1:00.99
  3. Youssef El Kamash, Grand Canyon University – 1:01.39

After being absent from the last stop of the Pro Swim Series in Mesa, which overall was a dearth of male breaststrokers, Cody Miller returned in Charlotte to win the 100 in 1:00.66. In the process, he beat out the winner of that Mesa meet, Youssef El Kamash, who was 3rd in 1:01.39.

In between the two came Miguel de Lara Ojeda of Mexico. He’s one of 21 Mexican swimmers using this meet as a last-ditch effort to qualify for this summer’s Olympics after Mexico cancelled their Olympic Trials event over the riff with FINA.

With the FINA “A” standard as a target, however, Ojda came up four-tenths short in 1:00.99.

WOMEN’S 50 BACKSTROKE – Finals

  1. Ali Deloof, Michigan – 28.03
  2. Kylie Masse, Canada – 28.11
  3. Kirsty Coventry, Zimbabwe/SwimMAC – 28.24

In the non-Olympic women’s 50 backstroke, Michigan’s Ali DeLoof, who just completed her final year of eligibility in March, won in 28.03.

She beat out Canadian Kylie Masse, who after a breakout season that included a National Record was named the CIS (Canadian Interuniversity Sport) Female Athlete of the Year across all sports.

Veteran Kirsty Coventry, who trains with the home team SwimMAC, took 3rd in 28.24.

MEN’S 50 BACKSTROKE – Finals

  1. Bryce Bohman, Unattached-West Virginia – 25.60
  2. Paul Le, Missouri State – 25.75
  3. Bob Glover, Indiana – 25.84

Bryce Bohman won the men’s 50 backstroke in 25.60, beating out a pair of college standouts Paul Le (25.75) and Bob Glover (25.84).

The race also featured Arkady Vyatchanin in 5th place with a 26.13. That is Vyatchanin’s first result since news broke last week that he was not cleared by FINA to change his sporting nationality from Russian to Serbian for the 2016 Summer Olympics.

WOMEN’S 100 BUTTERFLY – Finals

  1. Dana Vollmer, California Aquatics – 57.23
  2. Penny Oleksiak, Canada – 58.25
  3. Kelsi Worrell, Louisville – 58.37

With the headlines pre-written about the battle between the two best butterfliers, it was actually a Canadian teenager who came the closest to challenging the defending Olympic Champion Dana Vollmer (57.23).

Penny Oleksiak, a 15-year old who took a quarter-of-a-second from the Canadian National record in this event in April, held off a late-charging Kelsi Worrell to take 2nd in 58.25. Worrell was 3rd in 58.37.

As for Vollmer, the event champion, her 57.23 was another early hallmark that an extended competitive break to give birth to her child hasn’t hindered her battle to defend her gold medal this summer in Rio.

MEN’S 100 BUTTERFLY – Finals

  1. Santo Condorelli, Canada – 52.53
  2. Tim Phillips, SwimMAC – 52.83
  3. Matthew Josa, SwimMAC – 53.43

SwimMAC’s Tim Phillips charged out hard in front of a home crowd, splitting 24.22 at the 50 meter mark, by Canadian-American Santo Condorelli lay patiently and made up a four-tenths gap over the last length, and then some, to win in 52.53.

Phillips took 2nd, followed by his SwimMAC teammate Matthew Josa.

Belarusian champion and Olympic qualifier Pavel Sankovich took 4th in 53.66, and South Africa’s Dylan Bosch was 5th in 53.88.

WOMEN’S 400 IM – Finals

  1. Cammile Adams, SwimMAC – 4:38.97
  2. Rose Bi, Club Wolverine – 4:46.55
  3. Lindsey Clary, Ohio State – 4:46.75

Cammile Adams won easily in a 400 IM field that lacked the depth of the field nearby at the Atlanta Classic.

While Adams’ biggest focus of late has been the 200 fly, historically she’s been a very good 400 IM’er, including a 3rd-place finish at the 2012 Olympic Trials.

Her 3:38.97 win on Friday was the fourth-fastest time in her career and just seven-tenths from the time that got her a 3rd-place finish in Omaha the last time around. While a 4:38 may not even make the final in 2016, Adams posting a time as fast this early in the season will give some pause as to a run at this spot in June. The 400 IM comes on the meet’s first day, while the 200 fly doesn’t begin until day 4.

MEN’S 400 IM – Finals

  1. Ryan Lochte, SwimMAC Carolina – 4:16.92
  2. Tom Peribono, Ecuador – 4:18.92
  3. Michael Weiss, Wisconsin – 4:21.81
Ryan Lochte won a secure victory over Tom Peribonio in the 400 IM.

While Lochte’s first three 100’s were all much faster than any of the women’s in Charlotte or Atlanta tonight, it is interesting that Katie Ledecky out-split Lochte by 1.15 seconds in the freestyle leg of her 400 IM – reminiscent of his experience in London, where he won men’s 400 IM gold, but was out-split by Ye Shiwen, the women’s champion.

Peribonio, who finished 16th at NCAA’s this year, is nearing the FINA ‘A’ standard of 4:16.71.  As a representative of Ecuador, Peribonio may get to go to Rio with tonight’s swim.

The field was small in Charlotte tonight, with only 26 competitors in the event.

In This Story

Comments

  1. bobo gigi says:

    Nice 1.57.26 for Leah Smith. 0.16s faster than in prelims. She’s consistent. And that’s a new PB for her.

    • tm71 says:

      she will certainly be on the relay in some capacity. if she can split 156 or below that will be great given how fast ledecky and Schmitt are swimming.

  2. tm71 says:

    Dwyer a very easy 1.46.6. he has been very consistent in these meets. I see a 145 low at the USOT.

    • bobo gigi says:

      He’s always been a fast in-season swimmer so I wonder how much time he can drop fully tapered.
      But yes, 1.45 something looks logical.

    • Irish Ringer says:

      I hope he finally breaks through to that 1:44 barrier. He’s been close for a while now and seems to be swimming as good as he’s ever swam.

  3. tm71 says:

    lilly king 10574 big time PB !
    meili 10653

  4. bobo gigi says:

    1.05.73 for Lilly King!

    Remember I predicted a sub 1.05 next summer. She’s on fire!

    And great 1.05.94 for Katie Meili too.

  5. bobo gigi says:

    If there’s something special in Atlanta, please inform me. 🙂

  6. Irvine says:

    Lilly King is definitely the favorite at OTs! Katie Meili also a solid in-season time, hope she can beat her 1:05.64 from last summer sometime soon. Can’t wait to see what these women put up in the 200!

  7. tm71 says:

    miller 1.00.66 not too bad.

  8. bobo gigi says:

    Another big PB for Ali Deloof in the 50 back final. She won in 28.03.
    What happens to Kathleen Baker? I don’t remember her time, live results don’t work here either, but I believe that’s above 29. Hopefully not another girl who struggles after a year at Cal.

  9. tm71 says:

    vollmer easily in 57.23
    worrell only 3rd in 58.37

    • bobo gigi says:

      Worrell has peaked for NCAAs in mid March.
      Then she went to France to swim at French nationals late March.
      She has probably started another full training cycle to peak in the summer.

  10. bobo gigi says:

    Dana Vollmer wins the 100 fly in 57.23. Consistent.

    A mother’s perspective
    http://www.usaswimming.org/ViewNewsArticle.aspx?TabId=0&itemid=14634&mid=14491

    • tm71 says:

      in 2012 she wasn’t swimming this fast in these meets. then we know what she did in London. it would be amazing if she is able to swim sub 56 again after being out for almost two years!

    • Rafael says:

      She will be in Rio.. don´t know about a sub-56.. but she might be the favorite for Silver (Expecting a new WR next week is Sjostrom is tapered)

  11. Irish Ringer says:

    Tim died on that second 50….

    Condorelli 24.62/27.91 52.76
    Phillips 24.22/28.61 52.83

    • tm71 says:

      for comparison in Atlanta:

      1Schooling, Joseph I 20 Un-ST 53.23 51.86
      r:+0.57 24.38 51.86 (27.48)
      2 Shields, Tom A 24 CAL-PC 52.54 52.02
      r:+0.73 24.59 52.02 (27.43)
      3 Conger, Jack P 21 Un-ST 53.49 53.33
      r:+0.68 24.97 53.33 (28.36)
      4 Nolan, David J 23 North Baltimore- 54.41 53.60
      r:+0.68 25.21 53.60 (28.39)
      5 Martinez, Luis C 20 AU-SE 53.46 53.67
      r:+0.65 25.22 53.67 (28.45)
      6 Dressel, Caeleb R 19 BSS-FL 54.23 53.75

      looks like shields will be a solid favorite to join MP on the team in this event

  12. tm71 says:

    Camille adams easily in 4.38
    it was a “ledekian” margin of victory !

  13. tm71 says:

    Lochte 416 in 400 IM
    seriously doubt he swims this event at the USOT

    • Rafael says:

      Why not? According to some readers his 4:12 where he almost needed to be picked out of the pool by a fishing net is proof that he will go for Rio and break the WR!!!

      But seriously, I doubt he will try that.. even if he tried.. no way he can beat Hagino now.

      • Joel Lin says:

        It’s a given he will go with 200IM, 200 free focus for Rio. At trials he will swim one round of the 100 free just to put in as a relay candidate, but that is a hard relay to hook on with now.

        I don’t think given that schedule he couldn’t do the 400IM on the first day. Yes, it is a taxing event to swim twice but there isn’t anything conflicting with it the first day. Let’s not underestimate that he tends to drop 10-12 seconds when he tapers in this event.

  14. Hswimmer says:

    Lily King will win 100 Breast in Rio in 1:04.0

    • Danjohnrob says:

      That would sure be nice for the US, and I hope you’re right, but I think we’d be well advised to give Ruta the benefit of the doubt. Defending a title is tough, but it’s not like she’s over the hill and washed-up. 😉

  15. Captain Ahab says:

    Lilly King might go 2:18 in the 200 Br this weekend.

    • Rafael says:

      Captain.. how a 1 second drop on 100 breast will turn into a 6 second drop on 200?

      • Taa says:

        Swimmer math????

      • Captain Ahab says:

        Rafael posed the question “how a 1 second drop on 100 breast will turn into a 6 second drop on 200”

        Answer: Ray Looze is a great coach. Quite honestly he inspires the Indiana athletes to swim unbelievably.

  16. carlo says:

    BOBO GIGI hold on now for that gold medal contender for lilly king. Let,s see what she can do in three rounds but great swim though.
    The breaststroke is one of the toughest races to predict when swimming in three rounds but lily king and Katie meili should be contenders.

    Georgia bohl swam 1:06:12 at the Australian trials in 3 round which is quite impressive.

    Rita meilutyte is proven in high pressure situations so I put her as the favorate for gold. 1:04 low?

    • KeithM says:

      I don’t see 3 rounds being the hindrance that you believe. They have 24 hours to rest after heats and semis. It’s not that much of an encumbrance once you’ve qualified for the final. In fact it might help the finalists. An entire day to recuperate and plan how to improve their time in the final. If she was swimming a 400 race or had a busier schedule then it would be more of an issue.

      • Gina says:

        I think it is in the 100 . A high level semi is very taxing mentally .Then you have to keep the adrenaline levels right after sleep & a full day spent worrying.

        A one day AM -PM is easier imo. After the heats you only have to build up once.

        • KeithM says:

          The operative word there is “mentally.” Physiologically not really. But as we’ve seen the mental side of things seems to be more of an issue for some swimmers more than others.

          • Gina says:

            I think when you have done x time after 3 competitive rounds then your confidence is high that you can work back through to get thru the heats & semis . Depends on what sort of person you are I guess but I’d like to have known I’d gone the distance. The last 4 Olympics have been seamless with quarters close by . Rio is going to be different perhaps .An extra day to battle the mosquitos .

            But I’m not convinced Rio will happen until it happens . Maybe they’ll go into full revolution mode.

  17. carlo says:

    Ryan lochte is not dropping 10-12 seconds in the 400im tapered at the age of 30+
    The 400im is not kind on the bodies of older swimmers which is why Phelps ditched it. Great decision by phelps.

    Ruta is definitely not washed up. People forget she,s just 19.
    She has the fastest 50 breast time this year. I think a 31 low which may be a disappointment for any other swimmer as before the elbow injury she was constantly swimming 29,s and 30,s but she was still getting into shape so we may definitely see her swimming 29 and 30 secs regularly in the 50 breast soon which would be good for her 100.

    I think she has already swam 1:05 something this year ebow injury or not.

  18. Victor P says:

    I’m loving the last paragraph of this recap….and yet, 16yo Ye Shiwen outsplit Katie Ledecky by 0.9 seconds. The same Katie Ledecky which at this same pool swam 1:54.8 200 Free. Katie Ledecky, who has specifically trained for endurance significantly longer than Ye ever did. By proportionality, Ye should have been able to produce a 1:53 200 free all at the tender age of 16, and yet she never swam a sub 1:57.5 200 free. Hmmm. Along with all the other Hmmms on her record, last of which was swimming 22 seconds slower (5.5 per 100) at the clearly over the hill age of 20. Hmmm.

    No parallels here, folks. Lochte swam proportionally slower the last 100 (2 secs), just like he swam the entire race proportionally slower compared to his 2012 performance.

    • Gina says:

      Ye Shiwen trained endurance style in Australia after Beijing , She had a 4.33 at 14 in 2010 .The PRC bronze medallist was also an endurance swimmer (800 champ & silver medallist at 2010 Asian games ). My point is that they were both indeed distance trained .

      Ye had a 1.56+ 200 free about the same as Alicia Coutts . Ye beat out Alicia by about 29.3 to 29.6 in London . BTW are you campaigning for Alicia to get that Gold or just Biesel?

      • Victor P says:

        Actually, Ye’s lifetime best at the 200 is 1:57.54, even though she clearly was capable of a 1:53 already at age 16. She also has a better closing 100 at age 16 than the greatest endurance swimmer in the history of the sport at age 19, followed by a string of far from characteristic performances culminating in one. Ye’s 200 free split in London of a relay start was 1:57.37. She never went 1:56, but she should have been able to split 1:52 high off a relay start based on a 58.68 breast to free final 100 in the 400 IM (which is like a 57.9 straight freestyle leadoff). Her final 100 free in the 400 IM at 16 was faster than Schmitt’s final 100 free in her 200 free Olympic record swim (and fastest textile suit 200 freestyle ever). That in itself has never happened in the sport – that an athlete is able to produce a faster final 100 freestyle leg in the 400 IM than the fastest athlete ever in the 200 freestyle. Agnel went 52.50 in the final 100 of his 200 Olympic record. That would actually translate to like a 53.2 breast to free final 100 transition in the 400IM. The fastest ever on the men’s side was 55.7 for the final 100 – which is blazing from guys who swim 48 second 100s. Ye’s time is not even 3 seconds slower and also nearly 1 second faster than Ledecky – the greatest female distance swimmer our sport has ever seen . Combine that with the fact that Ye’s most recent performance doesn’t even rank her in the top 150 in the world…If we should have learned anything by now is that where there is so much smoke, there most certainly is a fire. Her performances are off the bell curve – in both aspects – either way too good or astonishingly poor. It isn’t the 1st or the 100th time the swimming community misses the blatantly obvious – see the 1994 World Championships, see the East German domination for the better part of nearly 2 decades – all of their athletes were systematically doped – yet we somehow missed that all. Now there’s Russia. We need to stop looking the other way. It is KILLING our sport. People are not willing to analyze and it’s making cheating far too easy.

        Gina, I don’t know what you’re talking about regarding the 200 freestyle, since neither Coutts nor Ye were in the 200 free final in London.

      • Victor P says:

        Actually, Ye’s lifetime best at the 200 is 1:57.54, even though she clearly was capable of a 1:53 already at age 16. She also has a better closing 100 at age 16 than the greatest endurance swimmer in the history of the sport at age 19, followed by a string of far from characteristic performances culminating in one. Ye’s 200 free split in London of a relay start was 1:57.37. She never went 1:56, but she should have been able to split 1:52 high off a relay start based on a 58.68 breast to free final 100 in the 400 IM (which is like a 57.9 straight freestyle leadoff). Her final 100 free in the 400 IM at 16 was faster than Schmitt’s final 100 free in her 200 free Olympic record swim (and fastest textile suit 200 freestyle ever). That in itself has never happened in the sport – that an athlete is able to produce a faster final 100 freestyle leg in the 400 IM than the fastest athlete ever in the 200 freestyle. Agnel went 52.50 in the final 100 of his 200 Olympic record. That would actually translate to like a 53.2 breast to free final 100 transition in the 400IM. The fastest ever on the men’s side was 55.7 for the final 100 – which is blazing from guys who swim 48 second 100s. Ye’s time is not even 3 seconds slower and also nearly 1 second faster than Ledecky – the greatest female distance swimmer our sport has ever seen . Combine that with the fact that Ye’s most recent performance doesn’t even rank her in the top 150 in the world…If we should have learned anything by now is that where there is so much smoke, there most certainly is a fire. Her performances are off the bell curve – in both aspects – either way too good or astonishingly poor. It isn’t the 1st or the 100th time the swimming community misses the blatantly obvious – see the 1994 World Championships, see the East German domination for the better part of nearly 2 decades – all of their athletes were systematically doped – yet we somehow missed that all. Now there’s Russia. We need to stop looking the other way. It is KILLING our sport. People are not willing to analyze and it’s making cheating far too easy.

        Gina, I don’t know what you’re talking about regarding the 200 freestyle, since neither Coutts nor Ye were in the 200 free final in London. They did, however, compete in the 200 IM final, where Ye went 29.32 to Coutt’s 29.91 in the final 50. Those were the 2 fastest splits in the final 50 and nobody else went within 1.5 seconds of Ye in that final 50. Seeing as Coutts swam 53.78 in the 100 free just a year prior and improved on her 200 IM time also from just a year prior, it’s safe to say that Coutts was a solid 53 mid 100 freestyler. What would that make Ye’s 100 freestyle, seeing as she outsplit Coutt’s final 50 by 0.6 second? Safe to say that Ye should have been capable of a 52 high 100 freestyle. So not only would she be on par with Kromowidjojo who won the 100 free gold in Olympic record time (53.00), as an endurance trained athlete she should have been able to swim a 1:53 200 free (e.g.: Ledecky: 53.7/1:54.4; Allison Schmitt is another good example – relay split of 53.25, probably a 53.6 100/1:53.6 200 – crazy good), not the actual 1:58 she swam (1:57.37 off relay start equivalent). That’s a big discrepancy for an endurance trained athlete, but then so is the 4:50.7 she just swam at age 20 – 22.3 seconds slower than 4 years ago – so she lost a whole lot of conditioning in literally less than 2 years (4:30.84 – 5/2014 to 4:50.74 – 4/2016). These times aren’t just off – they’re way off. 5 seconds per 100m and she wasn’t sick. Chinese media spin it as 3 years of poor physical condition and injuries, yet somehow in the middle of that she’s able to swim 4:30.8.

        When it’s all said and done, I don’t blame Ye. Like any athlete from a communist system, they don’t really have too many choices, especially not being so young. You conform to the system. Anybody else would have done the same thing in her shoes. It’s all the adults who look the other way that concern me.

        Please, anybody,challenge my assertions. I think about this stuff a lot (probably too much!), but if there’s a flaw with my logic, I don’t see it – point it out, please. But if I’m right, our sport stands to lose a lot if we choose to look the other way when things don’t add up.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ye_Shiwen

        http://swimswam.com/olympic-champ-shiwen-ye-7th-400-im-chinese-olympic-trials/

  19. TXbackstroker says:

    I don’t think Molly Hannis should be counted out just yet! She’s still got a chance in the breastroke finals.

  20. MichaelTran says:

    Quick thoughts!
    1. Lilly King and Dana Vollmer: very impressed by their performances especially King. I predict lilly king will go 1:05 mid in Omaha and maybe sub 1:05 in Rio to challenge the gold medal especially destroy Georgia Bohl and the Chineses in the replay.And Dana? What a comeback!! Enough said. Dana will get silver in rio (because Sarah Sjostrom comes from another planet ) but the important things we hope is the gold for the us in women’s medley relay. If Missy shows the answer for Seebohm and for us in the 100m bk, the gold is very close!
    2. Conor Dwyer is very consistent. He is my choice for one spot in the 200m and will help the us team a lot to win gold in the 4x200m replay.
    3. Lochte! Lochte! Lochte!! Please don’t do the 400m IM again!! So painful. 200m free and 200m IM are enough for you, my idol! :))))))
    4. Cody Miller and the other US breaststrokers!! Come on you guys! I know you can do better. I really want someone to break the 59.00 for the US but i’m not sure :(((

  21. carlo says:

    I don’t think lily king or any US breaststroker is going to destroy Georgia bohl come rio. Georgia bohl has been improving incrementally anytime she gets into the water and is currently the second fastest in the 50 breast this year ( a 31 mid) behind Ruta meilutyte with yet another pb. There really isn’t a huge gap between 1:05:7 and 1:06.12 which means the US breastrokers have to be a lot faster to avoid the Campbell sisters. But Georgia bohl just keeps getting faster.

    • caleb says:

      There’s a pretty big difference between 106.1 tapered at OTs and 105.7 at a mid-season meet in training, but we’ll see how it plays out.

  22. carlo says:

    my mistake Georgia bohl swam 30.58 this year in the 50 breast not 31 mid. The second fastest time in 2016. I think Ruta meilutyte has the fastest time. Not sure.

  23. carlo says:

    caleb, that 1:06 low was swum in 3 rounds.
    There is a big difference between a 2 round and a 3 round swim tapered or not.

  24. carlo says:

    victor p I get your point but how do you explain Katie ledecky swimming 8:06 in the 800 free. Is it normal. She swims as fast as a lot of teenage boys.

    • Victor P says:

      Carlo, I’m explaining several things. First, Ye was faster closing the 400 IM at 16 than 19yo Ledecky is now and yet Ledecky is our greatest distance swimmer ever. Ledecky’s endurance translates to whatever event she swims (53.7, 1:54.4, 3:57 (probably), 8:06.6, 15:25.4 – all normally consistent for the greatest distance/freestyle swimmer of the sport and consistent with other great freestylers). Ye’s performances are clearly not consistent – she can swim the final 100 of a 400 IM faster than the 2nd 100 of a 200 free. That just doesn’t happen and has never happened with anyone – ever. Are we supposed to believe that Ye is physiologically different to every athlete that has ever competed in the sport, or do we look at the Chinese track record from late 80s to late 90s in organized sport (swimming, track & field – and then, by far, the women stand out the most). Chinese media spin the injuring and conditioning issues Ye’s had. Very specious, especially considering her age and that in the middle of all that she still managed to swim a #1 rank time of the year (5/2014). Less than 2 years later she’s 5 seconds per 100 slower and severely cramping after a race (side effects of being off “medication”?). Look at the improvement arc. Ye peaked at 16 and then started deteriorating, followed by major deterioration (14 seconds slower from 19 to 20 and no longer ranked in the top 150 in the world as of her latest contest). She went from super girl to almost an unknown. Look at the East German case study. Specifically the women. Steroids have a disproportionate improvement with women vs. men. They went from having not a single Olympic champion in 68 & 72 (the women) to not just winning 11 out of 13 gold in 1976, but doing so in jaw-dropping style. Come German reunification, and my oh my what a change! Now Germany doesn’t even reckon in any conversation regarding medals. Ledecky’s improvement is very steady and she gets tested all the time, which is another issue with communist countries. We’ve had more positive drug tests in swimming than East Germany did in 19 years – and they were all cheating all the time. Do a search for the word “drug” (Ctrl + F) on this Wiki article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doping_in_East_Germany (also an EXCELLENT article to read that illustrates the gravity of looking away – everybody should read this because it is STILL not common knowledge). The sport STILL has not done right by all the athletes who have been cheated through the years (Shirley Babashoff is just one example – has anybody come out publicly and apologized for labeling her “Surly Shirley”). All the signs are there, even the parallels between then and now. This is not all coincidence and we should face it.

  25. carlo says:

    Victor p. I get you point but how do you explain Katie ledecky swimming 8:06 in the 800 free. Is it normal?
    She,s faster than a lot of teenage boys who struggle to swim 8:07-8:10

    On the other hand lots of teenage boys can swim 4:28 in the 400im.

  26. carlo says:

    But ye shiwen didn’t look like she was using steroids and hasn’t tested positive.
    I don’t want to comment on how Katie ledecky looks and sounds so I,ll leave it at that.

    • Victor P says:

      It’s the inconsistency in the performance (able to swim 58 at the end of a 400 IM, but swims slower in a 200 free?; able to out swim a 53.7 100 freer (Coutts – 200IM final leg – 29.32/29.91; everybody else slower than 30.8; but somehow doesn’t have that speed at the 200 free level, but does have it at the 400 IM level?; no longer can crack the top 150 in her pet event at the grand old age of 20?) and it’s the at times state sponsored doping (swimming and track – late 80s to late 90s). I hardly think that sort of thing goes in a communist country without the approval of the state. Individuals wouldn’t dare oppose state sanctioned policies (whether it be to use or not to use). Remember NO East Germans were ever stripped of medals and you can be sure they got tested – and they were ALL cheating. Their athletes don’t compete internationally as often as ours.

  27. carlo says:

    Ye shiwen also gets tested all the time. In fact in London after her monster swim in the 400im she was woken at night to get tested.

Leave a Reply

Name will be published. Email address will not. By commenting you agree to our Terms of Use & Privacy Policy.

About Braden Keith

Braden Keith

Braden Keith is the Editor-in-Chief and a co-founder of SwimSwam.com. He first got his feet wet by building The Swimmers' Circle beginning in January 2010, and now comes to SwimSwam to use that experience and help build a new leader in the sport of swimming. Aside from his life on the InterWet, …

Read More »

Don't want to miss anything?

Subscribe to our newsletter and receive our latest updates!