Virginia High School League Issues Guidelines for Returning to Sports

The Virginia High School League (VHSL) has released a document outlining guidelines for the return to high school sports in the fall.

The league oversees all high school athletics in the state of Virginia.

In the document, VHSL illustrates a three-phase plan for the return that includes sport-specific guidelines, dependent on the sport’s determined risk level. The league will move through the phases according to local guidelines, and it has not disclosed how long each phase will last.

Lower infection risk activities include:

  • Cross country
  • track and field
  • swimming
  • golf
  • tennis
  • forensics/debate
  • scholastic bowl
  • e-sports

Moderate infection risk activities include:

  • Volleyball
  • field hockey
  • gymnastics
  • soccer
  • baseball
  • softball
  • basketball
  • theatre
  • robotics
    • However, the organization determined that with appropriate cleaning of equipment and use of face coverings, volleyball, baseball, softball and gymnastics could be considered lower infection risk.

High infection risk activities include:

  • Football
  • wrestling
  • boys and girls lacrosse
  • competition cheerleading
  • music

Phase 1 of the plan is a complete ban of all activities, including practices and games. Currently, all sports governed by the league remain in this phase until further notice.

Under phase 2, there are still less-limited restrictions. However, social distancing measures still remain intact, especially in the sports deemed high risk. Some of these restrictions include:

  • Limiting capacity at all outdoor practices to 50% and all indoor practices to 30%
  • Athletes and coaches being subject to daily health screenings
  • Athletes are not allowed to share water bottles
  • Celebratory forms of contact (handshakes, fist bumps, etc.) are not allowed
  • All athletes must have their own equipment, especially in sports such as football and basketball.

Under phase 2, the only guidance provided for swimming specifically is “all relay teams should social distance”.

Phase 3 of the guidelines have not been released yet, and will be determined at a later date.

With the announcement, Virginia joins a slew of states attempting to salvage their high school sports seasons. However, in most cases the situation remains uncertain.

The Missouri School Boards’ Association (MSBA) recently published their recommendations for returning to schools, including a clause about revising “activities that bring large numbers of students and the public together”. Under this, Missouri high school swim season may be at-risk of being canceled. The UIL in Texas has allowed high schools to resume workouts, both conditioning and skills-based, with restrictions.

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Barbotus

Interesting. Call me a pessimist, but somehow I see a future article debating the appropriateness of a DQ called for a banned high five. At least there’s a plan to resume. Bowdoin’s announcement today is chilling.

SAMUEL HUNTINGTON

Interesting way to categorize certain activities. Could anyone explain to me how “music” (not sure what that means) is high risk but basketball is moderate risk? Basketball seems to me like an obvious high risk activity.

Bands and orchestras don’t work all that well when social distanced, though of course for just practicing they could make that word.

But, the more crucial issue: think singing, and woodwinds.

If you’ve never been to the theatre, or the symphony, and sat in a seat low enough to where you’re looking up at the actors/musicians through the light…just don’t. It will ruin everything for you. You’ll never again in your life not social distance. The clouds of spit flying out is unnnnnnreal.

SAMUEL HUNTINGTON

oh yea I did band in Virginia so I know. I just figured you could easily set up some safety measures for music programs to make it less risky but not so easily in a sport like basketball.
additionally, VHSL doesn’t monitor or control music programs as far as I know. Band and orchestra in Virginia is under the direction of the VBODA. So i was just surprised to see music in this article.