Team Ledecky, a Relay to her Own

  57 Braden Keith | August 03rd, 2012 | Featured, London 2012 Olympics, News

A fun fact, inspired by a tweet from Alex Braunfeld that read: Question; how many senior girls’ RELAYS went 8:14 this summer in the 800 free relay?

That’s a good question. One with an easy answer.

4.

Only 4 American relays of any age this year have swum an 800 free faster than 15-year old Katie Ledecky did on her own tonight. And two of them were the prelims and finals Olympic relays.

Both of the relays (the one that swam in heats, and the one that swam in finals) for the United States that won gold were each under 8 minutes. The best club relay is the Palo Alto group of Jasmine Tosky, Ally Howe, Rachael Acker, and Alicia Grima swam a 8:13.42 in March; and the women from the University of Minnesota were an 8:14.50 at the Minnesota Grand Prix in November.

Those were the only relay swims better than Ledecky’s 8:14.63 to win gold at the Olympics and mark the second-fastest swim of all-time.

Now, if Ledecky were a college post-grad, that might not be as impressive. Afterall, usually long course 800 free relays are swum by only high-school-level club programs (where big collections of development like that are rare) and on rare occasion college programs off of a taper.

But this is a 15-year old. high-school-level club programs are right in her wheelhouse. She’s in high school, after all.

Here’s where it gets wackier: her time is faster than the 15-16 National Age Group Record in the 800 free relay. And that was a relay from NOVA of Virginia that has at least two high-level Division I NCAA swimmers on it in Rachel Naurath and Alison Haulsee. Of course, Janet Evans’ old record in the 800 of 8:17.12 also was faster than that relay.

More amazing stats about this incredible swim:

  • Her opening 400 time of 4;04.34 was her best time, the fastest ever done by an American 15 or 16-year-old. It would also rank her 9th in the world in 2012, and would have final’ed in the individual 400.
  • Among all swims in the women’s 800 free in history better than 8:20, the best-ever opening 400 splits are: Ledecky 4:04.34, Manaudou 4:05.70, Adlington (WR swim) 4:05.72.
  • This is the second-best swim in history, behind just Rebecca Adlington’s 8:14.10 World Record.
  • The youngest gold medalist in Beijing was diver Chen Roulin who won two gold medals. She was 15 years, 241 days old as of the 2008 opening ceremonies. Ledecky was 15 years, 132 days old as of this year’s opening ceremonies.
  • Even opening in a National Age Group Record, Ledecky’s closing 400 meters of 4:10.30, without a dive, would have ranked her faster than all but two swimmers in her age group in the United States this season, and rank her 13th in history in 15-16’s in the United States.

In This Story

Leave a Reply

57 Comments on "Team Ledecky, a Relay to her Own"


Sort by:   newest | oldest | most voted
kcswimjk
3 years 11 months ago

Wow. What a great way to frame this swim. One for the ages. I wonder how many high school boys are going that fast.

phil
3 years 11 months ago

I think her race was fantastic. I was hopping she would brake the OR.

ston_ar
3 years 11 months ago

Also faster than the 15-16 girls NAG record in the 800 fr. relay.
Absolutely insane.

aswimfan
3 years 11 months ago

As I kept repeating in the live comments on the night, this is incredible swim and the most exciting since Janet Evans. And we should marvel and celebrate this swim.

However, I just can’t help to get sick at the apparent double standards of treatment between Ledecky’s swim and Ye’s swim.

liquidassets
3 years 11 months ago

I understand any suspicion about Ledecky; her rate of improvement in that event at that level is unprecedented, I think.

Lane Four
3 years 11 months ago

Everyone seems to be focusing on the fact that Ledecky dropping five seconds off of her Olympic Trials time to the Olympics in such a short period of time in unprecedented, sooooooo, she must have been doped. If you take a look back to the 1978 United States Long Course nationals, a certain 15-year-old Tracy Caulkins swam and won the 400 I.M. in something like a 4:48. A couple of weeks later she drops that time down to a 4:40 and wins the world championship gold medal AND breaks the steroid enriched world record of 4:42 by Ulrike Tauber of the DDR. No one accused Tracy of juicing up even after such a huge drop. Face the facts. Young kids drop times. Sometimes even monster sized chunks on the world stage. It happens. And I wouldn’t be the slightest bit surprised to see Katie take her PR of 8:14 down to an 8:10 in the next couple of years while her body is getting stronger.

MiamiMetro
3 years 11 months ago

I doubt anyone seriously thinks that. They are just pointing out the double standard.

Lane Four
3 years 11 months ago

That I totally agree with.

liquidassets
3 years 8 months ago

I’m not saying she must have doped, probably not in fact, I’m just pointing out that in this day and age, I understand the suspicion.

Fair
3 years 11 months ago

I agree, I think it’s absurd that so many people immediately assume Ye is on drugs, yet Ledecky is clean and she just had an amazing swim. What a double standard. I wish people could just have an intelligent conversation about this: innocent unless proven guilty. I feel terrible for Ye. It must be awful to have an entire community make assumptions based on your nationality. Personally I don’t think anybody should jump to the conclusion that either of these athletes is on drugs. It’s a combination of huge dedication and of course a lot of talent, unless there’s evidence to prove otherwise.

Brian
3 years 11 months ago

It’s not really double standards. Unfortunately, athletes on the international level pay the piper along with their country. It takes time to build up that trust that they won’t be doping. It took a while for Germany, and it will take a little time for China.

I think if they had their testing and such out in the open, that would alleviate 95% of the suspicion.

And for me, I think the only thing that bothers me about Ye’s swim is that her split was faster than the men in the 400 IM.

Even Ledecky’s splits, are nothing compared to Larsen Jensens splits, who I think out split her by almost two seconds a lap, just from pulling up records from 2010 Speedo Junior Nat’ls.

Other than that, hey, if there is just suspicion, why not. It’s not like China hasn’t done anything to earn that suspicion, especially with an athlete on their national team testing positive for EPO, which is a serious offense, and that scandal of theirs.

We’ve had what, Jessica Hardy and her contaminated supplement, and Michael Phelps taking a bong hit? Please.

My point: Trust takes time to build up once you’ve lost it. You’d be naive to start trusting nations with a major doping scandal in their sport (in the cases of China and Germany, state-sponsored doping of their national team) right away, unless they can have transparency and point to the changes they’ve made.

BeatHarvard
3 years 11 months ago

Let us not forget Angel Martino who tested positive for nandrolone and was kicked off the 1988 US Olympic Team. After her suspension, she was able to maintain a fair amount of her muscle mass and strength gained from the steroid use and continue to excel in sprint events for years. Astonishingly, she was elected one of the captains of the 1996 Olympic team. IMHO she should have been banned from the sport.

Skip Thompson
3 years 11 months ago

And for me, I think the only thing that bothers me about Ye’s swim is that her split was faster than the men in the 400 IM.? Ryan Lochte swim in the 100 was one of the slowest in the history of the event and as a % of the total time in the 400 IM race. You would expect that because he has the fastest 300 portion in the history of the race.

His first 300 meters was the best in swimming history. He was 3:06.5 at the 300 mark and was .55 seconds ahead of the WR by Phelps and his split at the 300 mark was 3:07.15 and if he would have swam his 2008 race he would have ran down Lochte on the final 50. I remember seeing the line go away from Lochte on the last 50.

I am not trying to downgrade the swim because I don’t know what his strategy was but I know that it was by far the fastest he ever has swam for the first 300 and maybe he wanted to get so far ahead that he would demoralize the field. He might have been shutting down or just plain died but still won by the largest margin and it was all in that first 300.

Phelps split a :56.79 and I believe that is the fastest split ever compared to the 58.6 split by Lochte. Now this is where it gets interesting. Tamas Darnyi swam a 57.60 24 years ago at the 1992 Olympics for his last 100 split and he was 3:16.63 at the 300 mark and swam a time of 4:14.23 and that time is 9 seconds slower than what Lochte did.

Another example is Tom Dolan at the 1994 World Championships. He swam a 57.66 for his last 100 split and he was 3:14.86 at the 300 mark and swam at time of 4:12.30 and that is 7 seconds slower than what Lochte did.

I remembered Darnyi’s swim because he would have out split half of the field in the 400 Free and this was talked about a lot back 20 years ago so this is not that unusual.

Lochte is by far the best 300 IM mark swimmer of all time and this includes tech suits. However, he did not get the WR because of that last 100.

In 1984, Alex Baumann swam a 58.28 on his last 100 of the 400 IM at the 1984 Olympics in a WR time of 4:17.53 and that is still faster than what Lochte did and that was 28 years ago.

The point in this is you can’t compare splits because everyone swims this event differently. Because I was interested in this I found that almost half of the 100 free splits in the 400 IM at past World Championships and Olympic Games were faster than 58.6

aswimfan
3 years 11 months ago

Skip, Ye’s split is not even that amazing compared to Adlington’s split of 28.91 after 750 m of straight out freestyle, and who outsplit SIX of the men in the men 800 free final in Shanghai.

MiamiMetro
3 years 11 months ago

It absolutely is a double standard. She has been swimming international competitions for 3 years with FINA testing her along the way. She’s been test 4 times in the past 12 months by FINA. It’s not Ye’s responsibility to atone for the past sins of others in China.

morrow3
3 years 11 months ago

You just want to be able to call that. You have been saying its a double standard since Ye’s swim – even before you could point a finger at any other swim and say, “see?”

Sadly, I believe the time of being in “awe” of ANY athletic performance (swimming, track, cycling) is over. Whether its by an American, Chinese or Jamaican, any athlete who beats a world class field (Olympics or World Championships) by a significant margin is suspect. Sad, but true.

We have been burned too many times by athletes of many sports and many nations to be naive anymore. We are right to question and be skeptical. We also have a right to believe everything we see on TV and see on the internet.

aswimfan
3 years 11 months ago

And I think Ledecky’s swim just edges out Ye’s swim as the swim of the meet.

I was truly stunned all the way through watching it live.

3 years 11 months ago

Me too, even through the commercial during prime time…

Brian
3 years 11 months ago

Yeah. I can’t believe they cut out to a commercial. What the hell?

aswimfan
3 years 11 months ago

By the way, in Shanghai last year, Adlington finished 28.91 after a gruelling 750 meters of straight out freestyle.
while Ye Shiwen finished in 28.93 in her 400 IM swim.

And yet leonard, craig lord, random people etc call ye Shiwen cheater.

Justin Thompson
3 years 11 months ago

I tend to give Ye Shiwen the benefit of the doubt considering she trains in Austrailia with Aussie coaches and not the state run programs, but she is paying the price of the past offenses of the Chinese.

beachmouse
3 years 11 months ago

Perhaps just like Franzi frequently got allegations because she spent her first ten years on the wrong side of the Berlin Wall. Memories are long in the sport, and it takes a while before there’s confidence the clean-up is real.

Fair
3 years 11 months ago

Paying the price of past offences? Every country has past offences. The USA was doping just like any other nation – debatable whether it was in swimming but certainly in track and other sports. The key was not getting caught. The US struck a deal with the Soviet Union not to sell out each others athletes for cheating. Just because China didn’t strike such a deal, should they be more guilty than others?

Jg
3 years 11 months ago

?

Brian
3 years 11 months ago

Oh, cut the crap with the “subtle” character assassination comments. It’s the mark of a coward. If you’re going to accuse the US of doping in a sport, make your case right here.

That’s right, you don’t have one.

Track, I’ll give you. There was the Marion Jones scandal, and the scandal with the men, etc. But I don’t see how that relates to swimming even in the slightest. Apples and oranges – they have different governing bodies, testing methods, etc.

The USA Swimming athletes do a phenominal job of getting tested, go through rigorous testing procedures, and do so often.

Oh wait!

I know, are you referring to the Chinese spokesman who said that “The Soviet Union, France, and the USA were all doping, so they were just doing it to level the playing field?”

I don’t know what sort of tin-foil hat you’re wearing to suggest that there was a deal between the US and the Soviets to not “sell out each other’s athletes”.

Not to mention athletes like Torres and Phelps have donated lots of their blood so that it can be tested at any point if new methods of detection break through, just to prove they were clean.

Of course there are individuals who screw up and cheat. But it’s much harder to trust countries like China or Germany, where the pressure is much much higher.

In the USA, it’s team and country first, then you second – a bunch of individuals from different programs coming together to compete for country.

In Germany or China, there’s the pressure of doing what ever it takes to win for the Fatherland or for the glory of the Honorable Chairman.

Jiggsar
3 years 11 months ago

You get an ‘A’ for creative writing. How about enjoying the competition and let others handle the drug testing.

MiamiMetro
3 years 11 months ago

We’ve been doping forever, we’ve just had the means and motivation to get away with it. People that were in track and field circles, at least, know this to be absolutely true, and it was believe to be equally spread across other relevant sports, to include swimming. You never heard much about this in the American press because no one wanted to hear it. It’s always the other guys who are cheating, especially the commies.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/2003/apr/24/athletics.duncanmackay

Also from Carl Lewis’ Wikipedia page:

In 2003, Dr. Wade Exum, the United States Olympic Committee’s director of drug control administration from 1991 to 2000, gave copies of documents to Sports Illustrated which revealed that some 100 American athletes who failed drug tests and should have been prevented from competing in the Olympics were nevertheless cleared to compete. Among those athletes was Lewis.[74]

It was revealed that Lewis tested positive three times before the 1988 Olympics for pseudoephedrine, ephedrine, and phenylpropanolamine, banned stimulants and bronchodilators also found in cold medication, and had been banned from the Seoul Olympics and from competition for six months. The USOC accepted his claim of inadvertent use and overturned the decision. Fellow Santa Monica Track Club teammates Joe DeLoach and Floyd Heard were also found to have the same banned stimulants in their systems, and were cleared to compete for the same reason.[75][76]

The positive results occurred at the Olympic Trials in July 1988 where athletes were required to declare on the drug-testing forms “over-the-counter medication, prescription drugs and any other substances you have taken by mouth, injection or by suppository.”

“Carl did nothing wrong. There was never intent. He was never told, you violated the rules,” said Martin D. Singer, Lewis’s lawyer, who also said that Lewis had inadvertently taken the banned stimulants in an over-the-counter herbal remedy.[77] “The only thing I can say is I think it’s unfortunate what Wade Exum is trying to do,” said Lewis. “I don’t know what people are trying to make out of nothing because everyone was treated the same, so what are we talking about? I don’t get it.”[78] The International Olympic Committee’s medical commission chairman, Arne Ljungqvist, said the Exum documents “fit a pattern” of failure to report on positive drug cases.

Jg
3 years 11 months ago

She has in the past for a few months.

Justin Thompson
3 years 11 months ago

To be fair there have been questions directed at Ledecky as well: http://www.swimnews.com/News/view/9694 and reported by the same who discussed the topic of doping as it relates to Ye Shiwen.

3 years 11 months ago

aswimfan,
these guys(like Craig OhLord!) wants attention,page hits, nothing more.

You can put in perspective these results(WRs and ORs) put a grain of salt in their injuries about that suit talk like:It will be a decade to beat that WR….

Jim C
3 years 11 months ago

Adlington swam a tactical race in Shanghai–tracking another swimmer the entire race before putting on her blazing finish. But you records are rarely set in such tactical races.

aswimfan
3 years 11 months ago

so adlington swam a tactical race but Ye did not?

Are you really THAT double standards?

unbelievable.

peayqn
3 years 8 months ago

A split like that is more common in a fast 800m than in a fast 400IM.

http://www.usaswimming.org/ViewNewsArticle.aspx?TabId=2175&itemid=3789&mid=11657

liquidassets
3 years 8 months ago

Thanks; this data fits with what we all know from experience; the 4IM is just a harder event than than the 800 free. It must have something to do with having to quickly build up speed in 4 different strokes, and having to shift muscle groups thee times in rapid succession. While I enjoy watching the 400 IM more, I strongly prefer swimming the 800 free, where one can set a pace/rhythym and then adjust only tempo as desired without having to abruptly switch strokes. When I shift from breast to free in the I.M., while I feel some “relief”, it also takes me quite awhile to build up speed and get into rhythm for the freestyle. Doped or not, Ye’s last 100 in that 4IM was a sight to behold!

MiamiMetro
3 years 11 months ago

Will John Leonard find this “disturbing” and “impossible?”

WHOKNOWS
3 years 11 months ago

It’s interesting that CNN was reporting this story of Ye earlier in the week. They kept on mentioning Leonard’s name and the American Swim Coaches Association. CNN said that they invited him to come on air and speak about it, but he refused. Wonder why!

Samuli h
3 years 11 months ago

W

DR. EVIL
3 years 11 months ago

We can only hope…that John Leaonard will keep his big uninformed mouth shut!

Craig Lord is a desperate journalist…looking for page hits!!

Sammy
3 years 11 months ago

All this arguing about who is doping and who isn’t makes me want to barf. As an ex-swimmer and a life long swimming fan, I’m just about ready to quit following the sport.

The fun has been taken out of the sport with all the finger pointing. It never ends.

Maybe high school swimming should change to 50 meter long course, so I can at least follow a sport that is drug free or at least I hope it is.

I’ve just about had enough!

AnotherSwimmingFan
3 years 11 months ago

Well they don’t test for anything in high school sports so naturally there would be no cases of doping.

Sammy
3 years 11 months ago

The high school kids could not probably afford to buy PEDs.

3 years 11 months ago

but their parents can. there is a guy in WI who has his 13 yr old daughter sleep in altitude equipment. He’s had her doing this for at least 2 years. he apparently had this built into a home he recently built. Some parents will go to great lengths to have their kids do what they can’t…

Kirk
3 years 11 months ago

Getting back to the actual swim here for a moment…

What really impressed me is Ledecky looked like she was sprinting the first 200 meters. I know I thought she was taking it out too fast and obviously Rowdy did, too. When NBC took a commercial break I thought for sure Ledecky would be behind when they returned to the coverage. It’s pretty amazing to be able to maintain that kind of apparent effort over 800 meters. Then again it was somewhat reminiscent of another great distance swimmer: Janet Evans!

Sammy
3 years 11 months ago

The European web sites showed the race with no commercial interruptions. I was able to see the entire race. NBC’s coverage is lousy…….

Kirk
3 years 11 months ago

Yeah, NBC is great. First we get to see the race hours after it actually happened and then we only get to see part of the race. It’s a race that takes eight and a half minutes. Is it really too much to ask to show the entire race? Apparently so. Yet I’m still watching NBC’s coverage, so there ya go…

spirith20
3 years 11 months ago

Congratulations to Katie, her family, her coaches and your home club. Her achievement is incredibly surreal on so many levels and deserves to be celebrated. Obviously, let’s hope that she will continue to improve and be an important part of Team USA’s success for years to come.

With regards to suspicions regarding Ledeky’s improvement compared to Ye’s my question is why wouldn’t people be suspicious of Ye’s swim in the 400 IM? It’s not a matter of Ye swimming the 400 IM, it’s a matter of the way she won with her closing 100 Free. Why isn’t she also swimming equally as fast in the 400 and 200 Free?

The reason for suspicion isn’t simply because she is Chinese but rather the Chinese have given multiple reasons to be skeptical of their performances in the past, whether it was systematic doping in the late 90s with them being caught bringing vitals of human growth hormones into Australia or cheating to win Olympic gold in the women’s gymnastics in 2008 with the use of an underage gymnast yet repeatedly lying about it. I don’t believe anyone is saying that Ye or another Chinese athlete is capable of achieving great results but it’s extremely difficult NOT to be suspicious of the team’s performances. The US has certainly had their fair share of athletes use performance enhancing drugs, whether in track and field or in swimming with Angel Martino in 1988. I think the difference is that there has previously been systematic cheating in the past by the Chinese with the support of the previous East German Dr’s. Just a perspective, not an answer.

aswimfan
3 years 11 months ago

Adlington swam 28.91 in her last split in Shanghai, FASTER than Ye’s last 50.

Adlington’s split was FASTER than SIX MEN IN THE MEN 800 FREE.

While Lochte was fastest in the men 400 IM, Lochte was not even among three fastest in the closing 50.

These double standards is sickening.

People pointed out to China’s past doping, but what about USA’s past and current doping practices!

Spirith20
3 years 11 months ago

With all due respect Aswimfan, to at least not be suspicious is a bit naive. Please explain to me where the US gov’t or at least USA Swimming has ever been involved in systematic doping. They haven’t!

s gomez
3 years 11 months ago

Ok, I apologize; I have not read all the comments.
My 2 cents on the ledecky/ye double standard are simple. John Leonard, because you had to go and point a finger at Ye, you brought backlash on the American, ledecky. I hope you are happy. she seems like a tough girl, but i bet you made her cry, i know i would if within 24 hours of the greatest race of my life people were accusing me of doping

This is the Olympic games people. If someone is doping I have faith they will eventually get caught, but accusations of such are entirely up to WADA, the IOC and other people who have that authority

I’ve been follower ledecky for quite a while now, I’ve been coaching USA and YMCA swimming for a few years now, and I must say that she has had an incredible career, and while I am thoroughly impressed with her performance, I am not surprised in the least she has done phenomenally and constantly responded to high pressure situations
Katie Ledecky you are an American hero and an inspiration & roll model to the girls (and boys) on the team I coach, I wish you the best in your career and I hope that you can simply ignore the jerks who are accusing you of cheating

-stephen gomez, charlottesville virginia

AJ
3 years 11 months ago

Lmao Brian trying defend the baseless Ye doping allegations. He is the textbook definition of a beta male.

Buckus Toothnail
3 years 11 months ago

@SPIRITH20

The United States Olympic Committee covered up 114 positive doping tests between 1988 and 2000, including those of 19 American Olympic medalists that should have not been allowed to compete.

This includes THREE failed doping tests of Carl Lewis at the US Olympic Trials prior to the 1988 Olympics. Under international rules of the time, this should have gotten him kicked off the US team and yet the USOC covered up these failed drug tests so that Lewis could compete. Carl Lewis has since openly admitted to using PEDs during his career.

And let’s not forget Marion Jones, who despite many suspicions on her performances which were purposely ignored by the USOC, escaped unnoticed for years despite her husband, a shot putter also on the US team, being banned for doping during the 2000 Olympics for testing positive FOUR times for steroids, and the fact that she actually tested positive during a random drug test in high school and was banned for 4 years until OJ Simpson’s attorney, Johnnie Cochran, got the ban revoked.

The USOC has a long history of covering up doping of American athletes so much so that it could be considered state-sponsored.

Is it a surprise that Peter Ueberroth, who was the Commissioner of Major League Baseball during some of baseball’s worst years of rampant and unchecked steroid use also served for many years on the United States Olympic Committee, including being its Chairman?

There is a reason why the USOC no longer has this authority to rule on doping cases and precisely the reason why the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency was created.

In fact, the US leads all countries in the number of Olympians that have failed drug tests during the history of the Games, and by comparison, tower over the number of Chinese athletes by a ratio of over 10:1.

Even this year, the US Olympic swim team has more certified drug cheats and dopers on its roster than the Chinese, namely Jessica Hardy. She is part of the USA women’s 4x100m freestyle team that just won bronze in these London Olympics, but was kicked off the US team for the Beijing Olympics for testing positive for a banned performance enhancer during the US Olympic Trails and was subsequently banned from competition for a year.

How shameful is that, that the United States Olympic Committee allowed a proven cheater that has FAILED doping tests on the US Olympic team to represent the US in these 2012 Olympics, when almost every other country now participating in the Olympics have adopted a ZERO-TOLERANCE policy, including China, and yet we make such a fuss over a foreign athlete that has passed every single drug test given to her.

Brian
3 years 11 months ago

“At the 2008 U.S. Olympic Team Trials, Hardy qualified for the USA Olympic Team.[21][22][23] A few weeks later, on July 23, 2008, Hardy was notified that the second of her three tests from the Trials came back as positive for low levels of clenbuterol; this notification subsequently leaked to the media.[24] Her attorney confirmed on July 24, 2008, that Hardy’s “A” and “B” samples from a test administered on July 4 were positive for clenbuterol, a banned thermogenic weight-loss aid and partial stimulant.[25]
Hardy claimed innocence and said she had never even heard of clenbuterol,[26] attributing her positive drug result to either a tainted nutritional supplement or sabotage. Media coverage of the issue noted that tainted supplements have played a part in some previous instances of bans. An example offered has been that of American swimmer Kicker Vencill, who won a lawsuit against a company that provided him with tainted supplements that resulted in a positive dope test and two-year ban from the sport.[27] Under both American and international regulations, a lack of knowledge of the source of the substance ingested is not considered to be a defence against a positive result.”

Via Wikipedia. To compare, you’re still talking apples and oranges…yes, guilty, because lack of knowledge is not a defense against testing positive.

And at least you know. You can’t be sure that the US has more dopers on it’s roster because of that. The entire Chinese team could have been swimming in EPO for the last 3 years and you would have no idea, because their country will never have a transparent national testing system.

Buckus Toothnail
3 years 11 months ago

Oh please, do you really buy the claim that she took the banned performance enhancer “unwillingly” and from a “supplement”?

That’s not a surprising “defense” from an American considering the excuse of “inadvertent use” of PEDs was coined by the United States Olympic Committee in 1988 after Carl Lewis tested positive in THREE doping tests at the US Olympic Trials.

Instead of banning him from the US Olympic team, which was what they were required to do under international rules at the time, they ruled that the positive tests were due to “inadvertent use” and let him stay on the US team where he won 2 golds and a silver medal at the Seoul Olympics.

The below is from an article in the Orange Country Register about the USOC scandal.

“Former International Olympic Committee Vice President Richard Pound agreed that the notion that so many athletes could have inadvertently taken banned substances lacked credibility.

‘Inadvertent use is complete nonsense,’ said Pound, now the director of the World Anti-Doping Agency, the group that oversees drug testing at the Olympic Games. ‘The offense is the presence of a banned substance in your system. Now if Nazi frogmen abducted you and injected you against your will, then you might have a case.’

The U.S. Olympic Committee’s anti-doping effort was so disorganized, complicated and prone to accusations of favoritism that a new group – the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency – was formed in 2000 to take over testing and sanctions.”

The bottom-line is the USOC, even in 2012, allowed a proven drug cheat and doper on the US Olympic swim team whereas most countries including China have adopted zero-tolerance policies.

We can hardly pretend to be this shining beacon of a dope-free Olympic program when we allow proven cheats on our team, and how hypocritical are we to then turn around and accuse foreign swimmers of doping when they pass EVERY drug test given to them, unlike our team?

And now with Ledecky raising suspicions, and rightly so, it’s pretty obvious we were pointing fingers at innocent swimmers from other countries to take attention away from our own doping.

Just look at Ledecky. Put her in a line-up with the East German swimmers from the 80’s and it’s impossible to tell them apart. She looks 35, not 15, and she’s losing her hair big-time which is an obvious tell-tale sign of extreme steroid abuse.

And more obviously, she knocked over 21 seconds off her PB in less than a year, was a complete unknown until a month ago, and she DESTROYED Janet Evans’ 800 meter freestyle record?

C’mon, how stupid do you think the world is? Yes, of course because she’s American, none of us really care or want to admit she cheated, but if we’re going to be falsely accusing swimmers from other nations, don’t you think we should clean house first?

Or have we really delved so low as to really use cheating accusations as a diversion tactic so that we can continue cheating and “winning”?

s gomez
3 years 11 months ago

quick question, maybe not the correct place to ask, but are chinese athletes (representing china) allowed to talk to western media? from what i understand most chinese are taught foreign language very well in school, english, french, german ect.

SBswimmer
3 years 11 months ago

Really sweet feature video on Katie Ledecky. You will cry. –> http://youtu.be/SRaQMhITxHc

carlo
3 years 11 months ago

i couldn,t help but notice the differences between ye shiwen and katie ledecky. Ledecky is going bald, has a deep voice and has massive arms and shoulders. She also looks about 35 instead of 15. Ye shiwen looks her age, doesn,t have a deep voice, she,s not getting bald and she has moderately sized arms and shoulders. In other words i would say i,m suspicious of ledecky bcos she looks like she,s on steroids.

wpDiscuz

About Braden Keith

Braden Keith

The most common question asked about Braden Keith is "when does he sleep?" That's because Braden has, in two years in the game, become one of the most prolific writers in swimming at a level that has earned him the nickname "the machine" in some circles. He first got his feet …

Read More »