Rutgers Swimmer Liza Ryndych Suspended for 2 Years By RUSADA

Update 3/16: a spokesperson for the Rutgers swimming & diving program declined to answer specific questions, but said that the school was “working alongside the Big Ten in reviewing the matter between Liza Ryndych and RUSADA.”

Original reporting is below:

Russian swimmer Elizaveta Ryndych (sometimes anglicized as Liza Ryndich) has been suspended for 2 years by the Russian Anti-Doping Association (RUSADA). RUSADA provided limited details about the reasons behind her suspension, but cited section 4.4 of the All-Russian Anti-Doping Rules. That section references the section related to Therapeutic Use Exemptions (TUEs).

TUEs allow athletes to take certain banned substances when it is medically necessary, and are common among international athletes. RUSADA itself can only provide TUEs for the national level; outside of that, it would be up to the international governing body (FINA) to issue them.

While neither RUSADA nor Rutgers has responded to a request for more information about Ryndych’s case, a typical case involving the citation of section 4.4 would mean that an athlete failed to obtain proper TUE paperwork for a substance that was prescribed legitimately by a doctor and deemed medically necessary.

The suspension is dated back to June 11, 2021.

Ryndych recently completed her freshman season at Rutgers University in the United States. At the Big Ten Championships in February, she placed 62nd in the 50 free (23.91), 45th in the 100 free (51.14), and 37th in the 100 fly (57.96). Her best time in the 100 fly came at the mid-season Princeton Big Al Invitational, where she swam 57.00.

The NCAA is not a WADA signatory, so doping suspensions based on WADA rules do not necessarily impact NCAA eligibility. The NCAA has its own testing program and protocols, though the presence of a banned substance and/or metabolite is still done by WADA-accredited laboratories.

Ryndych is currently one of three Russian swimmers listed on the Rutgers roster.

Russia is currently under sanction from WADA for its coverup of anti-doping rules violations and for limiting access to data and laboratories by WADA investigators.

Ryndych is Russia’s first announced anti-doping rules violation among swimmers for 2022.

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Cressel Remmel
8 months ago

Suspended by Russian anti-doping

Lmfao

Yozhik
8 months ago

Interesting, would the US government change their immigration policy toward foreign students from Russia. If the reviewing the current visas is not that simple and maybe costly then what about new ones. Or our progressive schools are for the global diversity if it backed by good money?

Gulliver’s Swimming Travels
8 months ago

It’s easy to forget sometimes that Russia even *has* an anti-doping association quite honestly.

Sprint Fanatic
8 months ago

Caeleb Dressel will certainly help her with that TUE paperwork.

Entgegen
Reply to  Sprint Fanatic
8 months ago

joke explained pls

Distance Per Stroke
Reply to  Braden Keith
8 months ago

wait, Dressel is taking 8 exempt banned substances? No wonder he’s so fast

IU Kicker
Reply to  Distance Per Stroke
8 months ago

Have you not met Caleb Dressel? That kid is ADHD to the max. He doesn’t need the meds to go fast. He needs them to know what stroke to swim when he dives in.

belle
Reply to  Braden Keith
8 months ago

Wow I didn’t know this. Although he doesn’t do anything wrong thechnically, 8 TUEs are a little suspicious.

DPS
Reply to  Braden Keith
3 months ago

Does anyone know which 8 substances he had TUEs for? Interest amount….

Wondering Willie
8 months ago

Jon Macol needs to go!

Swimws
Reply to  Wondering Willie
8 months ago

Explain?

Yozhik
8 months ago

I don’t know the Ryndych’s story and if she was really pursuing swimming career or it was just the way for her to be admitted to American college and to spend years living in USA and if she got a scholarship or paid her own money for tuition.
I don’t know. But if she is indeed for swimming then this punishment is almost nothing. She has already been a half way through it without any training and competition restrictions and the remaining year won’t hurt her chances in the current Olympic cycle if she has them.
If that is about money for college then there is a true story. The classmate of my son was a good high… Read more »

DMSWIM
Reply to  Yozhik
8 months ago

I’m having trouble following this story and the takeaway.

Diplo
Reply to  DMSWIM
8 months ago

I think the takeaway is the ol’ blinde-eye and nod some coaches can give to practices that they know are illegal, but can plausibly deny.

Yozhik
Reply to  DMSWIM
8 months ago

Sorry, I have nothing more to add to this story. That is all I know besides the real names and places. But I don’t exclude the possibility that the usage of prohibited substances by this girl who is actually nobody was not motivated by the desire to break the records.
In this regard I don’t understand the RUSADA’s motives toward this girl who nobody cares if she is on drug or not: neither WADA nor NCAA.

IU Kicker
Reply to  Yozhik
8 months ago

The motives may be to punish her for being in the US or for something that she’s posted on social media back home. She may want to go ahead and apply for asylum.

Hswimmer
8 months ago

Oof

matt
8 months ago

continuing the tradition

About Braden Keith

Braden Keith

Braden Keith is the Editor-in-Chief and a co-founder/co-owner of SwimSwam.com. He first got his feet wet by building The Swimmers' Circle beginning in January 2010, and now comes to SwimSwam to use that experience and help build a new leader in the sport of swimming. Aside from his life on the InterWet, …

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