Kliment Kolesnikov’s Meet Record Falls at Russian Youth Swimming Championships

2022 Russia Youth Swimming Championships

  • May 3-7th, 2022
  • Saransk, Russia
  • Long Course Meters (50 meters), Prelims/Finals
  • Full/Live Results

The 2022 Russian Youth Swimming Championships concluded on Sunday, where boys born in 2006 and 2007 and girls born in 2008 and 2009 competed. In total, 978 athletes from 63 regional teams competed.

Among the top performers of the meet was Sofya Dyakova from Tatarstan, who won three individual gold medals and set two Meet Records in the process.

The 14-year old won the 400 free in 4:15.69, which broke a 2013-minted Meet Record of 4:18.63 that was previously held by European Junior Champion, World Junior Champion, and Olympian Arina Openysheva.

Dyakova took another almost-three-second bite out of the record in the 800 free, winning by more than 20 seconds. She touched in 8:47.26, which broke the old Meet Record of 8:50.03 that was set by Yana Tolkacheva in 2001 – one of the oldest records standing for the meet.

Dyakova finished the meet with a 16:46.18 in the women’s 1500 free, leading the field by 26 seconds and taking almost 25 seconds off the Meet Record of 17:11.08. That record was set at last year’s meet by Polina Kozyakina.

Dyakova’s improvements:

Race Previous PB
Championship Time
400 Free 4:22.40 4:15.69 -6.71s
800 Free 9:03.94 8:47.26 -16.68s
1500 Free 17:07.57 16:46.18 -21.39s

She was responsible for three of the six Meet Records broken over the weekend. The other two were downed in men’s backstroke races, the races where Russia has had their biggest recent international successes.

In the 200 back, Iaroslyv Loze won in 2:01.05. That broke the 2018 Meet Record of 2:01.67 that was set in 2018 by Daniel Zaitsev.

Loze also won the 400 IM in 4:27.90.

The other records broken at the meet came in the boys’ sprint backstrokes, where Miron Lifintsev won both the 50 and the 100 meter races in new records.

Lifintsev also won the 100 back in a new record of 55.19. That broke the Meet Record of 55.64 that was set in 2016 by Olympic medalist Kliment Kolesnikov.

He also won the 50 in 25.62, a whopping 8-tenths of a second margin in just a 50 meter race. That swim broke his own prelims record of 25.93, which in turn broke Stepan Kalabin’s record of 26.01 set at last year’s meet. Even at just 16, his time would have ranked him 11th in Russia last year.

Other medal-winning results for him include a silver in the 200 backstroke (2:02.24) and a relay gold for four total medals.

Other Notable Triple Gold Medalists

  • Seraphim Fokina from Volgograd won the girls’ 100 fly (1:01.41), 200 fly (2:17.87), and 200 IM (2:18.28), and also picked up silver in the 400 IM (4:54.85).
  • 13-year old Viktoriya Shkarenkova was the top overall medal earner of the meet with 3 gold, 2 silver, and 1 bronze medal for Moscow. Individually, that included a win in the 50 breast (32.91) and 100 breast (1:12.54).
  • Aleksandr Markushin won both the 400 free (4:01.12) and 800 free (8:19.18) on the boys’ side, and added a relay gold for three total gold medals.

Other Notable Winners

  • 14-year old Ekaterina Stryuk won the 200 free in 2:03.78, a two-and-a-half second margin victory. That swim is still, surprisingly, two seconds shy of the Meet Record in the event. Of the 20 Russian women who were faster than that time in 2021, the next-youngest was four years older than Stryuk.
  • 16-year old German Zazhirskiy won the boys’ 100 fly in 53.96, which knocked 8-tenths of a second off his old previous best. Andrei Minakov holds on to the Meet Record in that event at 52.13 from 2018.

 

 

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Ukrainian
1 month ago

Those records make no sense because there won’t be such country as rUSSIA soon 🙌🏼

Yuri
Reply to  Ukrainian
1 month ago

Don’t hate a whole country because of its president. You can be better than that.

Ukrainian
Reply to  Yuri
1 month ago

Oh really? Learn the history since XVII century. russians have always been violent against most of their neighbors, especially Ukraine. It’s not pootin, not stalin, not lenin. It’s russians. And they are to blame. I’m f-in sick of air raid sirens every couple hours and constant news about more deaths and destruction all over my peaceful country. And it’s done by regular russians and powered by regular russian’s money.

dddddddd
Reply to  Ukrainian
1 month ago

ok now you’re just being racist

Oleg
Reply to  dddddddd
1 month ago

Russia is not a race

Swammer
Reply to  Oleg
1 month ago

Ignoring the fact that race is a social construct and has no biological basis (I can tell by your comments that you think it does), by the definitions common to social science: yes, Russian is a race.

But not all Russians are racially Russian.

HTH.

Scott
1 month ago

South Africa did not compete in the Olympics from 1964 to 1988 because of apartheid, and a sports boycott.

John Kennedy
Reply to  Scott
1 month ago

Israel competed during its apartheid.

Chris
1 month ago

I don’t care about anything involving Russia. As far as I’m concerned, they don’t exist anymore and shouldn’t be acknowledged here.

Swammer
Reply to  Chris
1 month ago

I get what you’re trying to do, but 1) ethical chest-thumping doesn’t really mean anything when we don’t know who you are (you don’t get any heaven-points if you post anonymously), and 2) “As far as I’m concerned, they don’t exist anymore” is a super borderline genocidal take that I think maybe you should re-evaluate.

The Russian invasion and slaughtering of Ukrainian civilians is awful, I agree, but I don’t think “they don’t exist anymore” is really the pointed take that you think it is.

Dee
Reply to  Swammer
1 month ago

“A super borderline genocidal take” – What on earth? The comment is clearly (to me) in the context of Russian inclusion in cultural and sporting events. As if anybody is suggesting genocide. Quite a bizarre use of emotionally charged language.

Swimmerfromjapananduk
Reply to  Dee
1 month ago

But the comment by the OP is still stupid regardless. I’m all for the coverage on Russian swimming, except for any highlights regarding Rylov, because you know why

Yozhik
Reply to  Swimmerfromjapananduk
1 month ago

The difference between Rylov and other swimmers is only that he was at that rally and they maybe not. But if you listen to what they are saying they just don’t care about Ukraine at best.

Oleg
Reply to  Swimmerfromjapananduk
1 month ago

No reason to cover Russia until they stop invasion. They are out of all international competition, because to defeat evils we need to unite and pressure each Russian citizen to overthrow their terroristic government

Swimmerfromjapananduk
Reply to  Oleg
1 month ago

Nah I like the coverage as I said before.

Chris
Reply to  Swammer
1 month ago

I was referring to Russia existing as a presence in the world in the context of athletics. They’ve gotten too many passes and deserve to not be acknowledged in any forum. I don’t need to re-evaluate anything. They are drug cheats and governed by a mad man that has slaughtered innocent women and children. They deserve to shunned to the likes of North Korea, a hermit kingdom.

Last edited 1 month ago by Chris
Chris
Reply to  Swammer
1 month ago

What does knowing who I am have to do with anything? Do you want my name and address?

monsterbasher
Reply to  Chris
1 month ago

Why isn’t this mindset carried over towards American swimmers when considering the atrocities America have committed themselves? The people of a country shouldn’t need to bear the mistakes of their country’s state and institutions unless proven otherwise (i.e Rylov and other Ukrainian war supporters). This kind of black/white thinking is what is perpetuating the deep political divides throughout the global landscape.

Also before yall downvote I don’t support any Russian state’s stances, but there’s a difference between discrediting governmental and state actions and discrediting the entire country and it’s person hood.

chris
Reply to  monsterbasher
1 month ago

give me some examples of our atrocities and i’ll agree it disagree if they are relevant. I totally understand what you mean, however I want to see Russia be disgraced even more. Sanctions are fine but it is evident that Putin gets rubbed the wrong way because his athletes are being sanctioned.
Its a necessary evil to let Russia take a breather from any international recognition for a few years, regardless of whether their athletes agree or disagree with him. I fully respect the individuals that live there that don’t want to speak out.

BearlyBreathing
Reply to  Chris
1 month ago

>As far as I’m concerned, they don’t exist anymore and shouldn’t be acknowledged here.
Not to be snarky — because I’m not him — but the best way to convey this sentiment would have been not to comment at all.

chris
Reply to  BearlyBreathing
1 month ago

understood. This whole Russia thing just makes me angry. Putin still breathing makes me angry. Russia being covered here in any capacity should make you angry.

Carlo
Reply to  Chris
1 month ago

To be honest the United States should have been banned from all sporting competitions after the invasion of iraq.

olivy
Reply to  Carlo
1 month ago

Unfortunately, it was Iraq who was banned in 2008. That’s how ridiculous it was.

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Braden Keith

Braden Keith is the Editor-in-Chief and a co-founder/co-owner of SwimSwam.com. He first got his feet wet by building The Swimmers' Circle beginning in January 2010, and now comes to SwimSwam to use that experience and help build a new leader in the sport of swimming. Aside from his life on the InterWet, …

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