Farris, Marcoux Lift Harvard Men over Princeton and Yale in Annual HYP Tri-meet

Harvard University vs. Princeton University vs. Yale University Double Dual Meet

  • January 29-30, 2022
  • Kiphuth Pool, New Haven, CT
  • SCY (25 yards)
  • Full Results (PDF)
  • Team Scores
    • Harvard (M) 228-Princeton (M) 125
    • Harvard (M) 248.5-Yale (M) 104.5
    • Princeton (M) 189.5-Yale (M) 163.5

Harvard swept its rivals Princeton and Yale in the annual double-dual meet known as H-Y-P, to remain undefeated in league play for the season. The Crimson downed Princeton 228-125 and Yale 248.5-104.5 to end the season with a perfect 7-0 record, taking home the 2021-22 Ivy League dual meet crown. The Ivy League Champions will be crowned at the conference meet on February 23-26 at Princeton.

Dean Farris and Raphael Marcoux, who were both originally in Harvard’s class of 2020 and are wrapping up their careers this season, powered the Crimson to decisive victories in New Haven. Farris won the 200 free (1:33.60) and 100 fly (46.30) and contributed to three first-place relays. He led off the 200 medley relay (21.62) and 400 medley relay (45.64) and he anchored the 400 free relay (42.08). Marcoux won the 50 free (19.99), led off the winning 200 free relay (19.99) and anchored the 200 medley relay (19.44).

Other event winners for the Crimson included diver Adam Wesson (1m and 3m), Gunnar Grant (100/200 back), Jared Simpson (100 breast), Mahlon Reihman (100 free). Grant was runner-up in the 200 IM and Simpson finished second in the 200 breast.

Princeton’s Raunak Khosla had a number of strong performances throughout the weekend, winning the 200 fly (1:43.49), 200 IM (1:45.43), 400 IM (3:48.52), and 200 breast (1:56.09). He also split a 52.60 100 breast on the runner-up 400 medley relay. Tyler Hong came in 3rd to Harvard but beat Yale in the 100 back (48.10) and 200 back (1:46.12). Dylan Porges won the 1650 free (15:09.11). Max Walther finished second to Reihman in the 100 free (44.02) but beat Yale to give the Tigers an event win. Princeton’s Taso Callanan and Colton Young went 2-3 on the 1m board and 3-4 in 3m diving.

Yale’s Noah Millard won the 500 free (4:18.99) outright and finished second to Dean in the 200 free (1:35.09), winning that event for Yale in the dual with Princeton. Alex Deng finished 3rd in the 100 breast (55.02) but was 1st against Princeton. Marcus Hodgson was 3rd behind Harvard’s Farris and Umit Gures (46.33) in the 100 fly but beat Princeton’s Nicholas Lim, 48.05 to 48.20, in that dual.

The Ivy League Championships have been dominated by Harvard and Princeton, who have finished either first or second every year since 1991, with the exception of 2017 when the Princeton team was benched for disciplinary reasons. Harvard has won the last four consecutive league titles and is favored to make it five this year.

 

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Barbossa Andrew 🐍
7 months ago

Anybody else see the Yale Asst coach complain to swimswam about delayed coverage on twitter? Good for Braden for standing up to him!

Rob
8 months ago
Just curious
8 months ago

Is it definite that Dean is making a run for the 2024 team? If so, anyone know where he’s planning to train next year?

Former Big10
8 months ago

Pretty high possibility that Dean doesn’t win an event at NCAA’s… he’s got Olympic medalists, and JR WR holder in all of his main events… wonder what his IM would be like in scy?

bobthebuilderrocks
Reply to  Former Big10
8 months ago

Isn’t he fastest returning in 1 back and 1 free? I’d say 2 free he’s least likely to win if he competes in it, even though he’s got the AR.

Moonlight
8 months ago

Yale needs a new pool. Kiputh Pool is charmingly historic and unique, but well past its prime. The pool has got to hurt swimming recruiting. Yale should build a world class facility that can host national meets.

flygirl
Reply to  Moonlight
8 months ago

Seriously doubt many swimming recruits are turning down Yale because of the pool

Wrong
Reply to  flygirl
7 months ago

As someone who turned down Yale because of the pool, you’re incorrect. The fact that the men and women train at the same time in the 6 lane pool, 7 to a lane doesn’t help.

50M Pools Rule
Reply to  Moonlight
8 months ago

Hard to disagree here. But that pool is exceptional and arguably the greatest swimming environment in the NCAA.

moonlight
Reply to  50M Pools Rule
8 months ago

I agree the atmosphere is exceptional. The whole place just needs to be a little more functional…

Jay Ryan
Reply to  50M Pools Rule
7 months ago

Six lanes only.

thezwimmer
Reply to  Moonlight
8 months ago

I’m pretty sure they also have a long course pool on campus

moonlight
Reply to  thezwimmer
8 months ago

There is, but it can’t hold competitions. It’s a practice pool with 5 lanes or something.

Jay Ryan
Reply to  thezwimmer
7 months ago

It is a 55 yd pool wedged in with no seating of deck space. An anachronism.

matt
8 months ago

dean should stick to free. man changes his lineup every year

Andy
8 months ago

Looking forward to showdown at NCAAs. Sates 133.8 vs Farris 1.33.6 in last dual meet action!

Caleb Montrealez
8 months ago

What’s up with Dean Farris trying to become a butter flyer now lmao

Gordon Wheeler Superfan
Reply to  Caleb Montrealez
8 months ago

Lots of swimmers with high end free speed often find out they are really good at fly as well due to similar movements in the pull. Great example is Gordon Wheeler. Elite freestyler in 100-500 range but ended up winning the MAC in the 200 fly!

Joe
Reply to  Gordon Wheeler Superfan
8 months ago

Why didn’t you just use Caeleb Dressel as an example?

Pvdh
Reply to  Joe
8 months ago

Dressel was an elite flyer coming out of HS

SWIMGUY12345
Reply to  Gordon Wheeler Superfan
8 months ago

Jack Conger is the example that comes to mind. Also fantastic at back. More of a middle distance guy though but he could really do it all.

tea rex
Reply to  Caleb Montrealez
8 months ago

I get he wants to try something new where he can break personal bests, but maybe the second best swimmer at Harvard is Umit Gures, who swims the 100 fly. So, it doesn’t work out great for the team.

Nathan Smith
Reply to  tea rex
7 months ago

Seemed to work out OK since they won the meet and won all of the events Dean Farris is best at (100 back, 100 free, 200 free). Dean Farris in 100 fly vs 100 back was probably a team points move since Harvard still took 1st and 2nd in the 100 back without him swimming it, then he helped them get 1st and 2nd in 100 fly. 100 free was close enough that Harvard had quite a few guys who were within tenths of 2nd. Dean Farris swam backstroke on the medleys so they still got some info on where he is at in those races.

About Anne Lepesant

Anne Lepesant

Anne Lepesant is the mother of four daughters, all of whom swam in college. With an undergraduate degree from Princeton (where she was an all-Ivy tennis player) and an MBA from INSEAD, she worked for many years in the financial industry, both in France and the U.S. Anne is currently …

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