2018 Asian Games: Day 2 Finals Live Recap

SWIMMING AT THE 2018 ASIAN GAMES

The second day of the 2018 Asian Games will see Xu Jiayu seek a second backstroke win and Sun Yang a second freestyle win, while Rikako Ikee chases two wins of her own.

Xu, the 100 back champ last night, sits second after heats of the 50 back. The Chinese star will look for double gold after tonight’s session. His countryman Sun will battle for the 800 free title in the final timed finals heat tonight. Sun won the 200 free on day 1 and has proven to be a dominant freestyler at the world level across a dizzying array of distances. He’s hinted at a renewed focus on the 1500 and over-distance events this season, and the 800 will be a good early test of that focus.

Meanwhile, Japan’s Ikee has a shot at two wins tonight: she’s the top qualifier by a longshot in the 50 fly, and will swim the 100 free shortly after. In the latter race, Ikee comes in with the top qualifying time from prelims and already sits 9th in the world this season, first among Asian swimmers.

In other events tonight, Kosuke Hagino looks to defend his 2014 Asian Games title in the 200 IM. He’s the Asian record-holder but has struggled with injury since setting that record in 2016. Another Japanese swimmer leads the 200 breast: Kanako Watanabe is in line to defend her 2014 Asian title.

China led the men’s 4×200 free relay this morning without using their star in Sun. Adding him to tonight’s relay should provide for a huge drop, though defending champs Japan can also cut some serious time with some lineup adjustments tonight.

Keep refreshing this page for live, event-by-event updates of all the action from Jakarta.

MEN’S 800 FREE TIMED FINALS

  • Asian Record: 7:32.12, Zhang Lin (CHN), 2009
  • Asian Games Record: 8:03.87, Aflah Fadlan Prawira (IND), 2018

Medalists:

Sun Yang booked his second gold medal in as many days, going 7:48.36 to shatter an hours-old meet record. The men’s 800 free is getting renewed focus internationally, based mostly on its recent inclusion into the 2020 Olympic program. This is just the second time the event has taken place at the Asian Games, with the last men’s 800 coming in the 1951 edition.

Sun, then, blew out the former meet record with his 7:48, even though it is more than ten seconds off his lifetime-best. He finished almost five seconds ahead of Japan’s Shogo Takeda (7:53.01),with Vietnam’s Nguyen Huy Hoang taking bronze in 7:54.32. Swimmers from the final heat made up the top five, with Kohei Yamamoto (7:59.60) and Ji Xinjie (7:59.99) getting under eight minutes. Top early heats swimmer Aflah Fadlan Prawira, who set a meet record at 8:03.87, fell to 6th overall.

WOMEN’S 50 FLY FINALS

  • Asian Record: 25.11, Rikako Ikee (JPN), 2018
  • Asian Games Record: 25.83, Lu Ying (CHN), 2014

Medalists:

Rikako Ikee hit gold in her first event of the night, going 25.55. It’s been two events and two Asian Games records so far, though Ikee – like Sun – was well off her own personal-best. In fact, Ikee was 25.11 back in June, setting an Asian record. In fact, just over a week ago, Ikee was 25.8 leading off her career-best 100 fly at Pan Pacs – not far off what she went in a pure 50 here.

China swept the minor medals, but finished a good half-second back of the dominant Ikee. Wang Yichun was 26.03 with Lin Xintong‘s 26.39 taking bronze. Wang is just 13 years old and already starting to pop on the international stage. Along with Ikee (18) and Lin (18), she helps form an all-junior medals podium in this event.

Korea’s Park Yerin (26.53) and An Sehyeon (26.67) came in next as a national pair.

MEN’S 50 BACK FINALS

  • Asian Record: 24.24, Junya Koga (JPN), 2009
  • Asian Games Record: 24.28, Junya Koga (JPN), 2014

Medalists:

  • GOLD: Xu Jiayu (CHN) – 24.75
  • SILVER: Ryosuke Irie (JPN) – 24.88
  • BRONZE: Kang Jiseok (KOR) – 25.17

In a battle of icons in this event, China’s Xu Jiayu outsprinted Japan’s Ryosuke Irie for 50 back gold. Xu was 24.75, matching exactly his time from Chinese Nationals in April. Irie finished just a tenth back in 24.88. Both rank inside the top 25 in the world this year, and were the only men at the Asian Games under 25 seconds.

Korea picked up their first medal of the night with Kang Jiseok‘s 25.17 for bronze. He beat out China’s Wang Peng (25.28) along with Indonesian star I Gede Siman Sudartawa (25.29).

WOMEN’S 100 FREE FINALS

Medalists:

In the latter half of a very-impressive double, Japan’s Rikako Ikee went directly from the medal ceremony of the 50 fly to the 100 free final, winning in 53.27. That’s only about two tenths off her season and lifetime-best, and also smashes her Asian Games record from prelims.

And for the second-straight women’s event, Japan won gold with China sweeping bronze and silver. 19-year-old Zhu Menghui was second in 53.56. She’s closing in on the Chinese record of 53.13 from the 2009 super-suit era, though she’s already been 53.4 earlier this year. 16-year-old Yang Junxuan went 54.17 for bronze.

Japan’s Tomomi Aoki was fourth in 54.58, well behind the medalists, but well ahead of the rest of the field. Hong Kong’s Camille Cheng went 55.39 for fifth place overall.

MEN’S 200 IM FINALS

Medalists:

Chinese national record-holder Wang Shun took home the men’s 200 IM title, using a massive free split to beat Asian Games and Asian record-holder Kosuke Hagino of Japan. Wang was 1:56.52, about four tenths off his own national record. That time tops his season-best by .05 seconds but he remains #4 in the world this season.

Hagino continued to struggle, a slide that has lasted since his big Olympic 400 IM win in 2016. Hagino took over the lead on backstroke but was ultimately passed up for gold, and went 1:56.75, four tenths off a season-best that would have won him the Asian Games title.

China’s Qin Haiyang19 years old, was third in 1:57.09 after leading on the butterfly leg. The only other contending swimmer was Japan’s Daiya Seto, who went 1:57.13 for fourth, though he was pretty much running fourth the entire race.

WOMEN’S 200 BREAST FINALS

  • Asian Record: 2:19.65, Rie Kaneto (JPN), 2016
  • Asian Games Record: 2:21.82, Kanako Watanabe (JPN), 2014

Medalists:

  • GOLD: Kanako Watanbe (JPN) – 2:23.05
  • SILVER: Yu Jingyao (CHN) – 2:23.31
  • BRONZE: Reona Aoki (JPN) – 2:23.33

It was Kanako Watanabe who rose to the head of Japan’s formidable breaststroking attack in the 200, going 2:23.05 to win a tight race among the top 3. In fact, Watanabe was third the entire way until she passed up the leaders over the final 50 meters.

23-year-old Reona Aoki jumped out to the early lead, only to be passed through the middle 100 by China’s Yu JingyaoYu would hold on for silver in 2:23.31, with Aoki making a late charge to 2:23.33, but still finishing third. Aoki is now the only female breaststroker to medal in both the 100 and 200 breaststrokes at these Games.

That trio was well ahead of the field. Fourth went to China’s Zhang Xinyu in 2:26.24.

MEN’S 4×200 FREE RELAY FINALS

  • Asian Record: 7:02.26, Japan, 2009
  • Asian Games Record: 7:06.74, Japan, 2014

Medalists:

  • GOLD: Japan – 7:05.17
  • SILVER: China – 7:05.45
  • BRONZE: Singapore – 7:14.15

With a far more competitive field that this morning’s heats, Japan topped China for a hard-fought 4×200 free relay win. The time for Japan’s quartet of Naito Ehara, Reo Sakata, Kosuke Hagino and Katsuhiro Matsumoto was 7:05.17, good enough to chop 1.6 seconds off the Asian Games record Japan set in 2014.

China (Ji Xinjie, Shang Keyuan, Wang Shun and Sun Yang) went 7:05.45, with their entire back half coming off of wins earlier in the night. Wang raced Hagino in a rematch of their 200 IM battle, as both held down the third split of their respective relays. 200 free champ Sun wasn’t able to chase down Matsumoto for the relay win on the anchor leg.

Singapore was third with the team of Quah Zheng Wen, Joseph Schooling, Yeo Kai Quan and Jonathan Tan.

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monkeyboy
4 years ago

It seems that if Hagino splits the breast well he sacrifices his freestyle. His last 5 meters of the race were super weak. Whenever his focus switches on a different stroke (last year was back, this year seems to be breast) something gets worse. I think a move from Japan would do him well, and this might be the best time to do it. Two years is enough time to make a big difference. A lot of people caught up while he got slower/stagnated. There seems to be a big chance of him ending up without any individual medals in Tokyo.

Love to Swim
Reply to  monkeyboy
4 years ago

He had elbow surgery after Rio, a second surgery in 2 years. His freestyle has looked worse since.

Swimmers often find it difficult to get back to their best after such major surgeries. Case in point: James Magnussen, Missy Franklin.

monkeyboy
Reply to  Love to Swim
4 years ago

Sorry. Didnt know he had 2 surgeries. Hes holding on well actually.

Swimmer
4 years ago

wow almost 9 seconds between silver and bronze

Bear drinks beer
4 years ago

Relay splits:
Sun Yang 1.44.19
Katsuhiro Matsumoto 1.44.85

Iain
Reply to  Bear drinks beer
4 years ago

Where are these from? Do you have the rest of the splits for these teams?

Bear drinks beer
Reply to  Iain
4 years ago

I calculated it by myself.
Their first legs are 1.47.31 (Ehara, Japan) and 1.47.58 (Ji, China) respectively. I didn’t calculate the other two legs.

Iain
Reply to  Bear drinks beer
4 years ago

Do you know the intermediate split so I can calculate them?

Bear drinks beer
Reply to  Bear drinks beer
4 years ago

Update:

Japan
Naito Ehara 1.47.31
Reo Sakata 1.46.51
Kosuke Hagino 1.46.50
Katsuhiro Matsumoto 1.44.85

China
Ji Xinjie 1.47.58
Shan Keyuan 1.47.15
Wang Shun 1.46.53
Sun Yang 1.44.19

ERVINFORTHEWIN
Reply to  Bear drinks beer
4 years ago

not enough to catch Haas 1.43 unfortunately – just joking aside

Philip
4 years ago

I think it will be appropriate to rename these the China/Japan Games. In all seriousness, great showing by Japan so far. They have no taper excuse. They just swim.

Love to Swim
Reply to  Philip
4 years ago

What? Asian Games are not just swimming. There are already 13 countries winning golds, from Indonesia to Uzbekistan to Jordan, Korea, etc.

Why not rename the Olympics USA/China games?
Or far more appropriately, Australia/England duel meets instead of Commonwealth Games.
Or USA/rest of Americas instead of Pan Ams?

Interesting info: these Asian Games is the first major sporting event that North and South Korea compete under the same flag/team.

Philip
Reply to  Love to Swim
4 years ago

I mean in swimming. They are the only two countries thus far to win all the golds and silvers.

j pine
Reply to  Philip
4 years ago

Wait for the butterfly sprints 😉

Love to Swim
Reply to  Philip
4 years ago

Let’s take your idea and rename Olympics Diving competition as Chinese Games and Olympics Basketball as USA basketball exhibition.

Philip
Reply to  Love to Swim
4 years ago

Dude, it was a tongue and cheek comment, I’m sorry if I offended you. I said, “In all seriousness”, I wasn’t literally advocating for the idea. Christ.

carlo
Reply to  Philip
4 years ago

The US dominates the Olympics in swimming. Nobody,s complaining.

Let China and Japan have their day for once.

Philip
Reply to  carlo
4 years ago

I’m not complaining at all lol.

Love to Swim
Reply to  Philip
4 years ago

Also, if you didn’t notice, in the last FIVE Asian Games (1998, 2002, 2006, 2010, 2014), Japan didn’t even finish in the top 2.

Superfan
4 years ago

Splits for relays. The official site only has 50 and 100 split and not the 200….at least on my phone

SLSR
Reply to  Superfan
4 years ago

Yea the official results on the official site only has 50 and 100 splits…..what a shame

i followed the live timings during the race…but only for the Singapore team. Hope it’s correct.

Quah Zheng Wen 1:48.31
Joseph Schooling 1:46.66
Danny Yeo 1:49.23
Jonathan Tan 1:49.95

Swimmy
Reply to  SLSR
4 years ago

Pretty good schooling split

Buona
Reply to  Swimmy
4 years ago

Not too bad, given that he don’t swim 200 free frequently.

ice
Reply to  SLSR
4 years ago

I just calculated the times as well. Amazing splits from the Singapore boys as a whole. And Joseph looks good. Even Zheng Wen who was off in his 200 Fly bounced back. And a 16 year old boy. Great swim. And great for Joseph to come swim this – he wasnt scheduled to swim this relay but he did

Buona
Reply to  ice
4 years ago

Yes. If Schooling doesn’t swim in this relay, Singapore will lost for sure. His split was surprisingly better than US swimmer, Blake Pieroni (1:47.63) whom swam the 2nd leg in Pan Pacific Championships.

Jem
Reply to  Buona
4 years ago

Erm. Singapore did lose. They got 3rd. Which is a great result for them. But…they did lose.

Love to Swim
Reply to  Jem
4 years ago

Context is important.

Losing bronze to Korea.

Jem
Reply to  Love to Swim
4 years ago

And you don’t think it was important to set the context right in a statement like that?

Buona
Reply to  Jem
4 years ago

Ok. I should write “Singapore will be out of top 3”.

Fjdjsjn
Reply to  Buona
4 years ago

The quickest time I have for Schooling in this relay is a 1:47.79 lead-off from the 2015 SEA Games, so his 1:46.66 flying start is a good sign from him. His gusto in the relay leg might also suggest that his swagger is coming back, so we might see the Schooling of old in the 100 fly. 🙂

Love to Swim
4 years ago

And Yang ran out of meters…. Japan first, China second, and Singapore in amazing third. Singapore swimming program has made such awesome leaps and bounds in the past few years.

ice
Reply to  Love to Swim
4 years ago

I may have screamed the house down trying to will Korea away for Singapore to take the bronze. But it was awesome. First proper relay medal in about a gazillion years (we won in 2014 through Park’s disqualification). And this was actually our least probable of all three relays

j pine
Reply to  ice
4 years ago

Bodes well for the 4x100m free and medley

Love to Swim
4 years ago

Matsumoto being chased by Sun Yang, it must be scary.

Love to Swim
Reply to  Love to Swim
4 years ago

That would be like when Groves chased by Ledecky at Pan Pacs or when Klete Keller was chased by Thorpe in 2004 Athens.

In all three occasions, the less heralded swimmers fought hard and triumphed at the end.

Love to Swim
4 years ago

Schooling was good through 175m but he ran out of gas towards the end. Piano found him.

HonestObserver
Reply to  Love to Swim
4 years ago

If he ran out of gas and still went a 1:46.6, that bodes real well for his 100 fly.

About Jared Anderson

Jared Anderson

Jared Anderson swam for nearly twenty years. Then, Jared Anderson stopped swimming and started writing about swimming. He's not sick of swimming yet. Swimming might be sick of him, though. Jared was a YMCA and high school swimmer in northern Minnesota, and spent his college years swimming breaststroke and occasionally pretending …

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