WATCH: Regan Smith Breaks American Record With 49.16 In 100-Yard Back

Video courtesy of 007krisg on YouTube:

Video courtesy of Chris Jostock, Kris Georges, and Kaden Georges:

From SwimSwam’s Braden Keith:

2021 MN AQUAJET MARCH INVITE

  • March 12-15, 2021
  • Jean K Freeman Aquatic Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota
  • Short Course Yards (25 yards)
  • Results on Meet Mobile: “2021 MN AQJT March Invite”

19-year old Regan Smith of Riptide Swim Team in Minnesota has broken the American and U.S. Open Records in the 100 yard backstroke.

Swimming at a local invite hosted by the University of Minnesota, Smith swam 49.16 in the 100 yard back final on Sunday evening. That shaves .02 seconds off Beata Nelson‘s fastest-ever time in the event of 49.18 swum at the 2019 NCAA Division I Women’s Swimming & Diving Championships.

Smith’s previous personal best was a 49.66 done at a Sectionals meet in Cary on March 10, 2019. Since that swim, she broke the World Record in the long course 100 backstroke by leading off the American 400 medley relay at the World Championships in 57.57.

American Record Splits Comparison:

REGAN SMITH BEATA NELSON
New American Record
Old American Record
50y Split 23.78 23.76
100y Split 25.38 25.42
Total Time 49.16 49.18

Smith now holds American Records in the 100 and 200 back in long course meters and the 100 and 200 back in short course yards, plus as a member of the American Record holding long course 400 medley relay. Three of those swims, the 100 back, 200 back, and 400 medley relay in long course, are also World Records.

On Sunday, Smith ended her meet with a 1:49.78 in the 200 fly. That makes her the #2 performer in history, just behind Ella Eastin’s all-time fastest swim of 1:49.51.

For Smith, who deferred her freshman season at Stanford last fall to stay home and prepare for the Olympics in Minnesota, this is an emphatic response to questions about her Olympic preparations. With complications of pool time and other challenges facing many swimmers around the country, Smith struggled a little in January’s Pro Swim Series meet. There she won the 100 meter back in 59.75 but was just 3rd in the 200 meter back in 2:12.99 in prelims – almost 10 seconds short of her World Record and her slowest time in the race since 2018. She scratched the final.

While the short course 100 backstroke isn’t a perfect indicator for success in long course, it’s at least a sign that Smith is in some kind of form, given that this was not a major national meet and she still broke the American Record.

Smith also swam the 100 fly in 49.88 and the 200 back in 1:47.81 this weekend. Her previous best time in the 100 fly was 50.45 and her best time, the American Record, in the 200 yard back is 1:47.16.

That 100 fly time is tied as the 22nd-best performance in history and makes her the 7th-best performer in the history of the event. The 200 back is the 5th-best performance in the history of that event.

This meet is part of the opening weekend of the Minnesota Swimming LSC’s ‘virtual championship series’ that features smaller invites around the state as compared to one large LSC championship meet.

In This Story

48
Leave a Reply

Subscribe
Notify of
48 Comments
oldest
newest most voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Swummer
6 months ago

That was just about perfect. Wow.

Waader
6 months ago

Everybody gangster until regan Smith drops a PB.

Irish Ringer
Reply to  Waader
6 months ago

Yup, she’s looking good now.

SwimFani
6 months ago

Toes above waterline on start, rough 2nd turn breakout and slight lift of head on finish…otherwise a very great swim. Congrats. Clean up those small errors and focus of increasing tempo without slipping H20 on last lap and you will be looking at 47 territory before finishing your NCAA career!

Flin
Reply to  SwimFani
6 months ago

Sounds about like a comment by a 1:00-backstroker

SwimFani
Reply to  Flin
6 months ago

Not even close…I be 54 100 yd back. SO THERE.

Lolo
Reply to  SwimFani
6 months ago

Bruh. If you did 54 you must be like some champion. What’s your name?

JHS
Reply to  SwimFani
6 months ago

The toes can be above the water line…they just can’t be curled over the gutter…which they were not.

SwimFani
Reply to  JHS
6 months ago

Not for NCAA swimming which is the best of any

Dudeman
Reply to  SwimFani
6 months ago

especially in NCAA swimming, this isn’t the 1970’s you can have your toes above the waterline, just not curled over the top of the gutter

PVSFree
Reply to  SwimFani
6 months ago

“Increase tempo without your catch slipping” is literally how any swimmer ever theoretically swims faster

SwimFani
Reply to  PVSFree
6 months ago

Literally and ever theoretically? Pick one and will be closer to the reality of BAM

flex tape cant fix that
6 months ago

56.69 Tokyo you heard it here first

Ferb
Reply to  Ferb
6 months ago

Just saying that I already called a 46. But okay, I’ll say 46.87. And 2:02.19.

Meeeeeee
Reply to  Ferb
6 months ago

46 would be slightly out of reach

Ferb
Reply to  Meeeeeee
6 months ago

She went 57.57 as a 17-year old in an afterthought swim (wasn’t even expecting to swim a 100 back in Gwangju, and it was basically a one-shot timed final). You think she can’t be .6 faster as a 19-year old, with her last two years being focused on that meet and that meet alone? You must be relatively new to watching Regan Smith.

He Said What?
Reply to  Ferb
6 months ago

Ferb, you meant 56 and not 46. Your comment needs editing. 56.87 not 46.87.

Ferb
Reply to  He Said What?
6 months ago

Yes. Yes it does. I’m afraid the statute of limitations on editing has passed, however, so the evidence of my stupidity will have to remain for posterity.

PVSFree
6 months ago

Man her backstroke is just so nice to watch, it’s very smooth

MiddleDistance84
6 months ago

She did not finish 3rd with a 2:12.99 in January. That was a PRELIM swim. She scratched finals and, presumably, flew home.

You Sada
6 months ago

Impressed with both Beata and Regan.

JCO
6 months ago

Great swim. Looks like she’s coming up a decent bit short of the 15m on each turn. If she can get herself to stay under for another few kicks and not lose that underwater speed, probably looking at 48.5

Dudeman
Reply to  JCO
6 months ago

and if she could swim faster she would have swam faster

About Jared Anderson

Jared Anderson

Jared Anderson swam for nearly twenty years. Then, Jared Anderson stopped swimming and started writing about swimming. He's not sick of swimming yet. Swimming might be sick of him, though. Jared was a YMCA and high school swimmer in northern Minnesota, and spent his college years swimming breaststroke and occasionally pretending …

Read More »