Vladimir Morozov Breaks 100 IM World Record In Chartres

2016 FINA WORLD CUP: CHARTRES-PARIS

After failing to earn a medal at the Olympic Games in Rio, Russian Vladimir Morozov kicked off the World Cup Tour with a bang in Chartres, breaking the world record in the 100 IM with a time of 50.60.

That swim breaks the previous record held by Germany’s Markus Deibler, set back at the 2014 Short Course World Championships at 50.66. Morozov won silver behind Deibler in that race going 50.81. His previous best time stood at 50.77 from the Vladimir Salnikov Cup in Saint Petersburg, less than two weeks after those World Championships.

Here’s a look at a split comparison from Deibler’s world record swim, Morozov’s previous best and his new world record set today:

That swim gives Morozov two gold medals on the day 1 of the meet, as he already dominated the field in the 100 freestyle going 45.57, just off his best time of 45.51, also set back at the 2014 Worlds.

Morozov was one of the Russian athletes initially banned from competing in Rio at the Olympics for doping implications, as he was mentioned in the McLaren report for suspected ‘disappearing positive tests’. He was reinstated just as the other athletes were, but didn’t appear on the top of his game in Rio. Now swimming short course, Morozov is clearly back in peak form.

Along with the prize money for winning an event, Morozov also earns an extra 20 points and a $10,000 bonus check for breaking a world record.

Morozov will also swim the 50 free, 50 back and 100 breast tomorrow in Chartres.

 

 

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StraightArm
6 years ago

Could predict what the comments section here would be like.
Vlad remains innocent in my eyes based the information at hand. But it has become trendy to bury anyone who’s name is mentioned speculatively in relation to peds.
Keep doing your thing Vlad and congratulations.

Steven Latham
Reply to  StraightArm
6 years ago

You are incredible uneducated and terribly voiced on this issue if you honestly believe that. You must be a friend of Vlads. There is proof that he had positive tests go missing

Lennart van Haaften
6 years ago

It would be nice of Ledecky uses her form to break a few scm world records. If you’ve done the training you might just as well give it a go.

beachair
Reply to  Lennart van Haaften
6 years ago

It’s not cheating until they can figure a way to catch them…

Jakob
6 years ago

Yay for doping!

Phelps swims 200 breast rio
Reply to  Jakob
6 years ago

This made me laugh 🙂

dude
6 years ago

drugs or no drugs, this guy is still fast. especially in the little pool

Sprintdude9000
6 years ago
Coachingtime
Reply to  Sprintdude9000
6 years ago

Clearly not, did you read any of the other comments?

bobo gigi
6 years ago

Haha! LCM and SCM are really 2 different sports. The pool in Rio was very long for him. He lives again thanks to the bathtub.

swimdoc
Reply to  bobo gigi
6 years ago

Ah, Bobo, back to the bathtub comment. The U.S. bathtub swimmers did well at Rio— Murphy, Manuel, Prenot, Pebley, Dirado, to name a few. It’s not really two different sports for some, and you need to acknowledge that. Ryan Murphy and Simone Manuel will kill anyone in either pool. Lochte was the same in his prime.

Zika Ziki
Reply to  swimdoc
6 years ago

Godot will arrive sooner than waiting for Bobo’s to acknowledge his opinion may not be correct even in the face of mounting evidence.

HulkSwim
Reply to  swimdoc
6 years ago

There are, and always have been folks who were significantly better at one over the other.

One of the Marshall’s (Gary or Peter) was a WR holder in SCM but was never really a contender in the LC pool.

There are some excellent SCM swimmers who don’t hit the same heights in LCM… there are (admittedly fewer) excellent LCM swimmers wgo don’t transition into SCM well… and then there are a good number of folks who do well at both.

Anyhow, your examples really don’t prove your point…

Jon Snow
Reply to  HulkSwim
6 years ago

But Bobo picked the wrong swimmer to prove his already shaky argument (or that’s what I thought he was doing. He could very well just want to make fun of Morozov for his failure to medal in Rio).
Morozov is one swimmer who do well at both. He has 21.47 and 47.62.
How American swimmers that are faster at both 50/100? Only Nathan Adrian.

Morozov is a very good backstroker too. He’s swum 53.70. LCM.

Steven Latham
Reply to  Jon Snow
6 years ago

All while on Meldonium and who knows what else. Morozov is a drug cheat. It is a disgrace that he is still allowed to compete

Old Swimmer & College Prof
Reply to  bobo gigi
6 years ago

Bobo– where have you been? We missed your olymypics commentary (and we missed ribbing you about Phelps ruining your picks!).

Dee
6 years ago

Zevina I’m guessing?

2.00.81 in SC pool 3 years ago – Big LC pb this summer so a drop is in the tank!

MTK
Reply to  Dee
6 years ago

Correct. 59.6-59.7 for 1:59.3, just missing Hosszu’s WR.

Steven Latham
6 years ago

What new Russian wonder drug is he taking? Fails to perform in Rio and after 2 weeks of partying etc he goes 45 and breaks a world record.
Every one of his performances will be suspect to me from here on out

Name
Reply to  Steven Latham
6 years ago

He’s a 25m pool man.

Yada
Reply to  Steven Latham
6 years ago

Strange how not being booed every time you walk out on deck can affect your performance isn’t it?

Skoorbnagol
Reply to  Yada
6 years ago

Your a jobber

Yada
Reply to  Skoorbnagol
6 years ago

Your mother was a hamster, and your father smelt of elderberries

Coach
Reply to  Yada
6 years ago

How does this comment get approved?

Yada
Reply to  Coach
6 years ago

Maybe Braden likes Monty Python

Mike Berkowsky
Reply to  Steven Latham
6 years ago

No doubt, Once a drug cheat always a drug cheat. How is he still allowed to compete?? How many positive tests did he have hidden??
Once again he is taking money away from swimmers that are clean and untainted.
Vlad you are a drug cheat, plain and simple.

MTK
Reply to  Steven Latham
6 years ago

It couldn’t just be that he’s an amazing short course swimmer?

Ferb
Reply to  Steven Latham
6 years ago

The presumption now, supported by FINA and even WADA, seems to be that it’s fine to take anything that is not explicitly on the banned list, regardless of the type of compound or it’s intended medical indications. Anything not yet on the banned list is fair game.

In my mind, the only solution to this problem is to stop using a “banned substance list,” and start using a “permitted substance list.” Anything not on the permitted list would be illegal, with athletes having the ability to appeal if they can prove a prior medical diagnosis that resulted in a prescription from a physician. It’s not a perfect solution & could still be abused, but at least it puts a little… Read more »

Tony
Reply to  Ferb
6 years ago

Any interesting idea. But couldn’t it devolve into a global competition for control of strategic resources needed to produce the permitted substsnces? As well, wada would then have to run near infinite tests on samples to check for the non-permitted.

Ferb
Reply to  Tony
6 years ago

There are probably some scientific hurdles, but I’m sure they could be worked around. As far as global control of the resources, the PED market is probably a very tiny fraction of the total pharmaceutical market, so I don’t think that would be an issue. The idea behind the permitted substances is to only allow medically necessary pharmaceuticals, or supplements and nutrients that have been pre-approved.

Ferb
Reply to  Tony
6 years ago

By the way, I agree that Vlad’s performance improvement since the Olympics is due to his being a better short-course swimmer.

About James Sutherland

James Sutherland

James swam five years at Laurentian University in Sudbury, Ontario, specializing in the 200 free, back and IM. He finished up his collegiate swimming career in 2018, graduating with a bachelor's degree in economics. In 2019 he completed his graduate degree in sports journalism. Prior to going to Laurentian, James swam …

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