Swimwear Manufacturer Dolfin Producing Face Masks for Coronavirus Protection

Protective face masks that cover the mouth and nose have become a highly sought-after commodity in 2020 as the world deals with the coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic.

As the United States faces a shortage of protective face masks, respirators, face shields, medical gowns, and other items of personal protective equipment (PPE), companies that do not specialize in medical supplies have begun to produce the PPE most-needed by those on the front lines of the COVID-19 fight.

Dolfin Swimwear, a division of Elite Sportswear, has begun producing protective face masks and mask covers for those in need of them. Face masks and covers will only become more important following a recommendation from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that all individuals wear some kind of a face cover.

President and CEO of Elite Sportswear Girisha Chandraraj provided SwimSwam the following statement:

During this unprecedented time, Elite Sportswear recognizes the importance of finding ways to support each other, and our Nation. That is why we are utilizing our production and manufacturing facilities to create essential medical supplies – protective masks and mask covers.

To all doctors, nurses, first responders, medical workers and essential personnel, we thank you for everything that you do. To our team, we are proud of you for helping make these needed materials happen. We are here for you and will come out strong, TOGETHER.

If you are an organization in need of these supplies, please reach out to [email protected], or via phone (800) 345-4087 or (610) 921-1469, option 1.

 

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During this unprecedented time, Elite Sportswear recognizes the importance of finding ways to support each other, and our Nation. That is why we are utilizing our production and manufacturing facilities to create essential medical supplies – protective masks, mask covers and gowns. To all doctors, nurses, first responders, medical workers and essential personnel, we thank you for everything that you do. To our team, we are proud of you for helping make these needed materials happen. We are here for you and will come out strong, TOGETHER. If you are an organization in need of these supplies, please reach out to [email protected], or via phone (800) 345-4087 or (610) 921-1469, option 1.

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Last week the CDC issued this statement recommending that all individuals regardless of whether they have demonstrated symptoms of the coronavirus wear a cloth face mask when in public.

We now know from recent studies that a significant portion of individuals with coronavirus lack symptoms (“asymptomatic”) and that even those who eventually develop symptoms (“pre-symptomatic”) can transmit the virus to others before showing symptoms.  This means that the virus can spread between people interacting in close proximity—for example, speaking, coughing, or sneezing—even if those people are not exhibiting symptoms.  In light of this new evidence, CDC recommends wearing cloth face coverings in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain (e.g., grocery stores and pharmacies) especially in areas of significant community-based transmission.

It is critical to emphasize that maintaining 6-feet social distancing remains important to slowing the spread of the virus.  CDC is additionally advising the use of simple cloth face coverings to slow the spread of the virus and help people who may have the virus and do not know it from transmitting it to others.  Cloth face coverings fashioned from household items or made at home from common materials at low cost can be used as an additional, voluntary public health measure.

The cloth face coverings recommended are not surgical masks or N-95 respirators.  Those are critical supplies that must continue to be reserved for healthcare workers and other medical first responders, as recommended by current CDC guidance.

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About Reid Carlson

Reid Carlson

Reid Carlson originally hails from Clay Center, Kansas, where he began swimming at age six.  At age 14 he began swimming club year-round and later with his high school team, making state all four years.  He was fortunate enough to draw the attention of Kalamazoo College where he went on to …

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