Michael Andrew goes after longer NAGs, breaks 13-14 200 fly mark in Texas

On a weekend dominated by college conference meets, Michael Andrew quietly added another National Age Group record to his collection at a Speedo Champions Series meet in College Station, Texas.

The 14-year-old Andrew went 1:46.29 to win the B final of the 200-yard butterfly, breaking the 11-year-old NAG record set by Ricky Berens. That time was 1:48.24.

Andrew, who owns NAG records in the 100s of all 4 strokes as well as the 200 IM, now appears to be turning his attention to the longer races, starting with this 200 fly. He also swam the 200 back Friday morning, but was disqualified in prelims. In addition, he’s slated to swim the 200 free and 200 and 400 IM later on in the meet, as well as the 100 fly, 100 back and 50 free.

Andrew is closing in on his 15th birthday, so it makes sense he’s trying out some other events to try and stamp his name on the 13-14 record book a few more times before moving up to a new age bracket. The Speedo Series meet will continue through Sunday night in College Station. Results are available on Meet Mobile, listed under “USA Swimming Speedo Champions Series.”

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7 years ago

Wow. SMASH.

Anonymous
7 years ago

USRPT is only good for short events therefore this article must be false./sarcasm

Reply to  Anonymous
7 years ago

SwimOnion?

Anonymous
7 years ago

I want race video of the Fly.
I want to know what he was DQed.for in Back.

Swim Witness
Reply to  Anonymous
7 years ago

He flipped turned at the finish

BJC
7 years ago

This guy is starting to look more and more like the real deal. His size is a big aid to getting the age group records in 50s/100s; but now with this 200 fly record smash and 200 IM smash in Orlando (On a BUSY schedule), he’s demonstrating impressive depth and strong technical skills. (Something I believe Phelps was regarded for in his age group days). USRPT might not be an end-all perfect training method for every swimmer, but it’s working damn well for Michael Andrew. Excited to see what he can do with the rest of his swims here, particularly that 200 free.

Peterdavis
7 years ago

He took his race out with guts and wasn’t afraid to make it hurt today. A lot of heart in that big 14 year old body. And he looked good doing it – better than I expected after hearing the peanut gallery rag on him here and elsewhere. Color me impressed.

bobo gigi
7 years ago

Impressive. That one could last a long time.
But his 13/14 NAG record work is far from being finished!
He still has the 50 free, the 200 free, the 500 free, the 1000 free, the 1650 free, the 200 back, and the 400 IM records to break! 🙂

bobo gigi
Reply to  bobo gigi
7 years ago

And the 200 breast!

BaldingEagle
Reply to  bobo gigi
7 years ago

That 200 br record is held by a younger, taller kid, and it’s a 2:00.

KP
Reply to  BaldingEagle
7 years ago

The kid is just plain awesome. I love the versatility. As his technique keeps becoming more and more refined, and he keeps growing and filling out, the sky is the limit. When you aren’t overtrained or burnt out, you have more energy to focus on that stuff. We are all watching something very exciting here! I can’t wait to see his 400 IM.

Justin Thompson
7 years ago

I was just beginning to think it’s been a few weeks since we’ve heard of Michael setting a NAG:)

It’s not everyday you see a NAG go down by 2 seconds in the 13-14 age group.

Allen
7 years ago

Michael is making history, and I wish there were more videos of his swims for his fans to see. Are there any underwater videos? Does anyone know?

bobo gigi
Reply to  Allen
7 years ago

NAG records history so far. Swimming history perhaps one day.
And about videos, swimswam has recently posted some of his races. I think his father or someone of his team films the races. We must be patient.

Peterdavis
Reply to  bobo gigi
7 years ago

You could say the same about a Chas Morton, but I think most would say he is a huge part of swimming history, at least in the US. Michael Andrew is now too. His story will be retold as either inspirational or cautionary. But he already has a chapter of his own in the textbook for History of Swimming class, which is hopefully not taught by boring old Professor Binns.

About Jared Anderson

Jared Anderson

Jared Anderson swam for nearly twenty years. Then, Jared Anderson stopped swimming and started writing about swimming. He's not sick of swimming yet. Swimming might be sick of him, though. Jared was a YMCA and high school swimmer in northern Minnesota, and spent his college years swimming breaststroke and occasionally pretending …

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