Indiana University Will Require Online Classes from Nov. 21 to Feb. 8

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, Indiana University will not hold in-person classes in the upcoming school year from Nov. 22, 2020 to Feb. 7, 2021, it announced Wednesday.

According to an announcement on the university website, school will begin on Aug. 24 as planned, and students will complete the 16-week semester on Dec. 20. However, students will not return to campus for the fall semester after Thanksgiving break, which starts Nov. 21. Spring semester technically starts Jan. 19, but in-person classes don’t begin until Feb. 8. Fall and spring breaks are canceled under the new schedule.

Fall and spring classes can be either eight, 13 or 16 weeks long for the 2020-21 academic year. The school is also adding a new winter session from Nov. 30 to Feb. 7.

According to the Indiana Daily Student, all on-campus rooms will be single-occupancy with a “rigorous exemption process” for students who request a roommate.

Last week, IU announced a partnership with IU Health to provide COVID-19 screening, testing and management services for the 140,000 faculty, staff and students at all IU campuses and facilities across the state.

IU is the latest in a handful of schools that have announced changes to their 2020-21 school year nationwide. The California State University system announced earlier in May that it will hold most of its instruction remotely this fall, though it’s not yet clear how that will impact the schools’ ability to have intercollegiate athletics. Notre Dame University has also altered its calendar in a manner similar to IU’s, though students will come back in early August and finish the fall semester in its entirety before Thanksgiving.

Last season, the Hoosiers swam at the Tennessee Invitational from Nov. 21-23 and hosted a diving invite from Nov. 22-24. There’s no word yet on how the school will handle athletics, but obviously, if students are not permitted to be on-campus while classes are online, that would be a significant hurdle to overcome for winter sports.

Indiana’s men and women both finished third at the 2020 Big Ten Championships. The men finished third at the 2019 NCAA Championships and the women finished ninth.

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Anonymous
4 months ago

Wow, sounds like a great move. So what if the “second wave” doesn’t come and now ur stuck home doing online classes not getting the education u deserve. Way too premature.

Anonymous
Reply to  HISWIMCOACH
4 months ago

Yah I don’t think a second wave would be as bad as now. We can’t shut down again, it’s just not smart to let small businesses loose even more money then they did from this extended lockdown we have in place.

Coach
Reply to  Anonymous
4 months ago

What if we are already in the second wave?

Less backstroke
Reply to  Coach
4 months ago

What if we haven’t hit the peak of the first wave?

HISWIMCOACH
Reply to  Less backstroke
4 months ago

That would be mathematically impossible to say we haven’t hit the peak. Look at the graphs for infection %, deaths and hospitalizations. All drastically down from their peaks. Try your next straw man please. You have no data, just wild assertions.

Coach
Reply to  HISWIMCOACH
4 months ago

It was a question, not a “wild assertion.”

Irish Ringer
Reply to  HISWIMCOACH
4 months ago

Depending on the day and who he is talking to Dr. Fauci is saying the same thing. “A second wave of the coronavirus outbreak in the United States “could happen” but is “not inevitable,” White House health advisor Dr. Anthony Fauci said.” https://www.cnbc.com/2020/05/27/dr-anthony-fauci-says-a-second-wave-of-coronavirus-is-not-inevitable.html

6-Beat Kick
Reply to  Anonymous
4 months ago

And what if a second wave DOES come and they made the right decision to save lives??

HISWIMCOACH
Reply to  6-Beat Kick
4 months ago

https://t.co/9WErBtVdRG?amp=1

Yes, we are saving lives … and there is a cost to that.

6-Beat Kick
Reply to  HISWIMCOACH
4 months ago

You are comparing IU to Rio and other entities in very, very different situations. IU (and other universities) have the ability to make do by turning to online options and is clearly the responsible thing to do in the current climate. 100,000 dead in a few months shouldn’t at all be taken so lightly.

HISWIMCOACH
Reply to  6-Beat Kick
4 months ago

Many on here are being myopic in their view of this topic. I am bringing out second and third opinions from reputable sources to consider for the “just one life” crew. Decisions made in the US don’t happen in a vacuum, and in fact, are more politically motivated than anything else.

Sean
Reply to  6-Beat Kick
4 months ago

On average 100,000 people die every 13 days in this country

MarkB
Reply to  HISWIMCOACH
4 months ago

So relevant to the SwimSwam article – both of yours concern Norway and Brazil.

DrSwimPhil
Reply to  6-Beat Kick
4 months ago

What if there isn’t a big 2nd wave, and this move by IU causes enough students to transfer (or take a gap year, or ask for $ back, etc) that it causes another wave of budget cuts, costing jobs, livelihoods, sports spots, college experiences, etc?

6-Beat Kick
Reply to  DrSwimPhil
4 months ago

Universities have many sources of income and I’m positive that if this wasn’t a viable option for them, they just wouldn’t do it. Not everything is shutting down. But I applaud them that they and other universities are taking precautions where they can.

DrSwimPhil
Reply to  6-Beat Kick
4 months ago

The major issue seems to be that they’re planning as if there WILL be one, not IF there will be one. That’s a major difference that will ultimately cost a boatload of $ (and the issues from that) for what? To gamble that it WILL happen? Where’s the payoff if they’re right? That part makes no sense to me. Have some contingency plans, sure, but to do this….yeah, sorry, that, to me, seems insane.

Blackflag82
Reply to  DrSwimPhil
4 months ago

It’s an interesting question, but unlikely to come to fruition. For someone instate, the difference between IU tuition and community college is negligible (and many cc’s are potentially doing online fall programs). Sure someone could take a gap year, but aside from a small group of elite athletes, what would be the point? It’s not like typical gap year opportunities (travel, volunteering, working) are readily available.

I think it’s more likely that colleges are recognizing they can meet some of their budget shortfalls while playing it safe and covering themselves liability-wise by doing these things. Going online will save them more money in terms of facilities costs/upkeep and staffing than they lose from a handful that might not come back

Bailey
4 months ago

Michigan state is doing the same thing

gator
4 months ago

Easy – just transfer right up the road to Purdue – better education anyway.

Backstrokebro
Reply to  gator
4 months ago

I would normally agree, 😉 but this time Purdue has a very similiar plan; straight school through Thanksgiving and starting back in early February; no fall or spring breaks. I don’t know if they’ll Have online classes. So no dive

About Torrey Hart

Torrey Hart

Torrey is from Oakland, CA, and majored in media studies and American studies at Claremont McKenna College, where she swam distance freestyle for the Claremont-Mudd-Scripps team. Outside of SwimSwam, she has bylines at Sports Illustrated, Yahoo Sports, SB Nation, and The Student Life newspaper.

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