A Very Forgiving Crowd – Missy Makes the Team

Earlier this week, last night in particular, Missy Franklin seemed to be, in her own words, “sluggish”. Last night, Franklin did not make the Olympic team in the 100 back, an event she won gold in at 2012 London Olympics.

With her so-called sluggish swims, the crowd and fans seemed to be reflect the same. Many critiqued her swims and even made statements that she would not make the team.

Tonight, she did. She placed second in the women’s 200 freestyle, and also making it on the 800 free relay.

Last night, after not making the Olympic team in the 100 back, her fellow backstroke swimmers from the heat swam towards her lane. Instead of half getting out of the pool one side, and half the other, they all swam to lane 1 where Franklin had swum her event. Each backstroker hugged her; something that sent chills down my spine and made me proud of this sport.

And tonight, after having an emotional few days, she made the Olympic team and the crowd erupted. While there has been so many back and forth comments on her, her performances, her training and her olympic chance, the “fans” were fans once again.

Nobody was sure what was going to happen in the 200 freestyle final, with having such an impressive and fast heat. With the favorite being Ledecky, the second place spot was for grabs. Franklin ended up holding her own and coming back to get her hand on the wall first (well… second).

Once Franklin touched the wall second behind Katie Ledecky, fans were roaring, celebrating with Franklin once again. It was the loudest the Omaha crowd has been yet this meet. The support for her was felt when almost every person was standing and cheering, for her.

It was a good reminder that we are all human, and swimming is a hard sport. It is even more impressive to watch an American favorite still punch her ticket to Rio after having what she calls a “sluggish” few days.

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Swim Fan

She got second in the 200 freestyle. If only there was a 200 freestyle relay in the olympics!!

Swimmer

wut

Deraj

SWIM FAN is correcting a typo in the article:
“Tonight, she did. She placed second in the women’s 200 freestyle relay.”

SWIMFANSSS

Missy is a real champion! Good luck in Rio 🙂

Flor

Go Missy!! A true champion is the one who never gives up <3

And to all the haters, perhaps she's just grown up and, yes, her speed might not be the same but she can maintain it throughout the 200 and that's all she needs.

shehulkswim

THIS! YES! All the haters can go suck a lemon!!!!!!!!!

Victor Davis Was King

I don’t think many of us have forgotten what you’ve written about Missy, Terri and women and general.

shehulkswim

what are you talking about? I ripped on Terri. NEVER MISSY. Tell me what i said if you haven’t forgotten.

SWIMFANSSS

I don’t think Teri’s coaching style has worsen Missy’s performances. You can see Kathleen Baker, Amy Bilquist, etc. doing well in the trials

Ferb

Bootsma and Pelton not so much.

Joe Swimmer

Listing swimmers who have done well under Teri McKeever doesn’t persuade anyone that McKeever has been the best coach for Missy Franklin. That just shows McKeever can put swimmers on the Olympic team. Remember, Richard Quick was a great coach, but he didn’t do anything for Janet Evans, and she has commented that the two of them didn’t get along. Just because McKeever is a great coach, doesn’t mean that she’s right for Missy. The truth is, the past is the past, and no one will ever know if Missy would be doing better now had she turned pro after 2012, or if she would be doing better if she had attended a different university. All we can do now… Read more »

BearlyBreathing

I’m really not sure what the point is of somewhat maliciously second guessing McKeever’s coaching ability. Many of her swimmers — past and present — have had great international success. Yes, some have not. Yes, other coaches have had success too. I don’t see the point of the comments, honestly.

About Caley Oquist

Caley Oquist

Caley Oquist grew up in a small town in Central Minnesota where she learned to swim at the age of four. She found her passion to write when her mother was diagnosed with cancer at the age of nine and has been writing ever since. Apart from her love for …

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