DQs Rage in Prelims at ACC Men’s Swimming Championships

Braden Keith
by Braden Keith 46

February 27th, 2021 ACC, College, News

2021 ACC MEN’S SWIMMING CHAMPIONSHIPS

  • When: Wednesday, February 24th to Saturday, February 27th Prelims 10:00 am | Finals 6:00 pm (1650 prelims Saturday at 4:00 pm)
  • Where: Greensboro Aquatic Center, Greensboro, North Carolina (Eastern Time Zone)
  • Defending Champion: North Carolina State University (NC State) (29x, 6th-straight) (results)
  • Streaming: ACC Network
  • Championship Central: Here
  • Detailed Timeline: Here
  • Psych Sheets: Here
  • Live Results
  • Saturday Morning Heat Sheets

There were a rush of disqualifications for stroke infractions in prelims on Saturday at the ACC men’s swimming & diving championships that could impact the final outcome of the meet.

Virginia’s Sam Schilling touched in 1:56.16 in heat 4, lane 2 before being disqualified for multiple dolphin kicks off the last wall.

A heat later, Virginia’s Matthew Otto swam in lane 3 and Virginia Tech’s Keith Myburgh swam in lane 4. Otto was disqualified for a one-hand touch, while Myburgh was disqualified for the same infraction as Schilling. Otto’s ultimate 1:53.73 would have placed him in the A final, while Myburgh’s would have made him the top qualifier in the B final.

It appears that all three infractions were called by the same official.

The challenge is not so much disbelief that three swimmers could have committed infractions in breaststroke at a meet of this level. To the contrary: videos of elite breaststroke races reveal that a mere fraction of disqualifiable infractions are called.

This leaves uncertainty for athletes about what is and isn’t allowed. Sports officiating is full of judgement calls, but what athletes usually hope for most is consistency so they know what to expect.

But the official in question can’t really be faulted for calling infractions, if in fact they were seen (we haven’t found any good video yet to confirm or reject them).

This all leads to the need for video judging, above and below water, especially in breaststroke, because the infractions are too hard to call consistently, too easy to get away with, and all-too frequent.

One event later, UNC’s Santos Villalon Centenera was disqualified in the 200 fly for a one-handed touch after a 1:45.93. That’s another swim that would have been a B-final qualifier.

Otto repeated his 200 breaststroke post-session in a time trial, swimming even faster at 1:53.41. That should safely earn him an NCAA Championship invite.

The original official who called the first disqualification also adjudicated the time trial, but this time the hand stayed down.

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Roger Hill
3 months ago

What’s the official’s name?

Apples to oranges, but I feel refs should have “post game” Q&A just like players and coaches have to do.

No reason a ref should have that many DQs in 1 session at this level.

Faulty Touch Pad
Reply to  Roger Hill
3 months ago

My theory is the first call was made, and that set the standard for the rest of the events for this stroke judge. There was likely multiple infractions of the double fly kick in the 200 breast, but other stroke judges had a different standard in mind. Clarity definitely needs to be made, or at least make sure all stroke judges are on the same page with what to call as a DQ before the start of the meet.

Petrona barros
Reply to  Faulty Touch Pad
3 months ago

Prior to a meet there is a stroke briefing, but never the official in charge should review or comment on a specific observation of an infraction because it will insert the “seed” what to look for or not. Example if you review a call -dq-breaststroke: “arms not in the same horizontal plane” and a discussion ensues during the briefing then, most likely you will have conditioned all those officials. Indirectly you just created a problem, Human behavior is that all those officials could be looking for that specific call. Humans are funny in their behavior. Thus the briefing only reviews standard stoke processes. In addition, most officials at this level at at the top of their game. IMHO, Breaststroke is… Read more »

Last edited 3 months ago by Petrona barros
Taa
Reply to  Roger Hill
3 months ago

Whats the matter? Did your kid get DQd

Roger Hill
Reply to  Taa
3 months ago

Naaaa taaaa, I’m a Pack fan, none of them were called today. This is a different official than who called the Pack DQ last night.

It’s not about “dId YoUr KiD GeT DQd” – it’s a matter of, these kids train all year, just to have a power happy ref call more DQs in a single prelim than all others combined this meet.

ole 99
Reply to  Roger Hill
3 months ago

Agree that there is no reason that a ref should have to DQ that many swimmers in 1 session at this level. Swimmers should know/follow the rules for the strokes by this point.

Faulty Touch Pad
Reply to  ole 99
3 months ago

The problem is that probably half of every breaststroke field that raced did a second “naturally undulated” kick similar to the kicks of the swimmers who got DQ’d. ISL highlighted how prevalent this infraction is, as well as any other meet with an underwater camera. So to these swimmers trying to stay competitive at a high level, they have to try to thread the needle with the rest of the world on this issue of the “natural undulation” that occurs during the pull out. These swimmers definitely did not dive into the race thinking “I hope I get away with this”. That is just how they were trained to swim, because high level swimmers around the world do the same… Read more »

An official too
Reply to  ole 99
3 months ago

Should know, but still practice one hand touches, and multiple dolphin kicks…follow the rules? Ha!
And I’ve officiated at an international level meet, and there are athletes that have dove in at warmups, and then claim they didn’t know.
It’s all about whether or not they can get away with it. And whether or not the official is tough enough to call a star athlete out , and then have to deal with their coaches.

Azswummer
Reply to  An official too
3 months ago

I totally agree. The envelope is pushed on a constant basis the older swimmers get. I say this as a swimmer, official, coach, and parent. Our job as an official is to observe, not inspect. At this level, these officials should be very experienced. Not to say there aren’t some bad ones, because there are. So hard to judge the “swipe” touches and clearly see pullouts, ect with waves, glare, ect. Really hard if you have multiple lanes to observe. Swimmers are in and off the wall SO fast.

sven
Reply to  Roger Hill
3 months ago

Bad take imo. If we start doxxing judges, staffing meets will become very difficult.

Add video review to breaststroke and IM events, don’t make results official until all swims have been reviewed, and be transparent by making all underwater footage available to the public.

If you think that’s a good start but you’re still itching for more, make all dolphin kicks illegal on breaststroke: Knees aren’t locked during the pullout? DQ.

Let’s be fair
Reply to  Roger Hill
3 months ago

Okay but also notice it was 2 UVA kids, I know that team is teaching their swimmers to do that because their girls do it as well. Watch out for NCAAs hoos bc your cheating is going to be called OUT

Huh
Reply to  Let’s be fair
3 months ago

It was 1 VT kid and 1 UVA kid. The other UVA kid was a 1 hand touch. Every single team in the NCAA with elite breaststrokers have swimmers that do it.

Azswummer
Reply to  Huh
3 months ago

Bad habits still develop even if you are an elite swimmer. That’s why we try to teach the 10 yr olds legal turns and finishes!

ACCFAN27
3 months ago

Old lady in the pink mask. Hope to see her with some glasses as finals tonight

accfan28
Reply to  ACCFAN27
3 months ago

she was raw doggin too someone tell her put that mask over her nose 😂

Misha Fan
3 months ago

Meanwhile the SEC kids can do as many dolphin kicks they want on pullouts

Yup
Reply to  Misha Fan
3 months ago

The SEC is “just better” dont you know?

Lord Farquad
Reply to  Yup
3 months ago

Actually, I believe the phrase is “It just means more.”

Misha S.upid
Reply to  Misha Fan
3 months ago

SEC living rent free in your head!

sven
Reply to  Misha Fan
3 months ago

Make Dolphin Kicks Illegal Again

About Braden Keith

Braden Keith

Braden Keith is the Editor-in-Chief and a co-founder of SwimSwam.com. He first got his feet wet by building The Swimmers' Circle beginning in January 2010, and now comes to SwimSwam to use that experience and help build a new leader in the sport of swimming. Aside from his life on the InterWet, …

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