Budapest 2017 World Championships Logo Revealed on FINA’s Site

The logo for the 2017 FINA World Championships in Budapest, Hungary has been revealed on the FINA website.

Budapest is a late-comer to hosting this event in 2017, taking over the event after Mexico backed out as 2017 hosts due to financial issues. Budapest was originally scheduled to host the 2021 World Championships, but moved up four years to fill the spot vacated by Mexico.

The logo, which you can see below, is fairly low-key, especially compared to logos from previous World Championship events, and compared to the logos for the Rio 2016 Olympics and 2016 Short Course World Championships, which you can see alongside the Budapest logo here.

budapest2017

The logo subtly incorporates Hungary’s flag, a tri-color pattern of red, white and green in horizontal stripes. You can see the flag slightly repurposed on the right side of the splash logo above the “B” and “P.”

The logo also plays on Budapest’s unique history and geography. The city was actually two different cities until 1873, when the city of Buda was merged with the city of Pest to become the new combined capital of Hungary. The two cities were originally distinct as the Danube river flowed between them. The Chain Bridge, built in 1849, became the first permanent bridge across the Danube, suddenly connecting the two cities and sparking what would eventually become a merging into one combined capital.

Geography lesson aside, the 2017 Budapest World Championships will take place from July 15-30 of 2017, and should take advantage of Hungary’s swimming-crazy population as well as its larger-than-life swimming icons (Katinka Hosszu, Laszlo Cseh, Daniel Gyurta) to draw a large crowd to the event.

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ok
5 years ago

Why are the logos for all of these events so generic?

Paella747
5 years ago

What exactly do you want to see?

About Jared Anderson

Jared Anderson

Jared Anderson swam for nearly twenty years. Then, Jared Anderson stopped swimming and started writing about swimming. He's not sick of swimming yet. Swimming might be sick of him, though. Jared was a YMCA and high school swimmer in northern Minnesota, and spent his college years swimming breaststroke and occasionally pretending …

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