No Americans Entered in Next Week’s Olympic Open Water Test Event

12 out of the first 20 qualifiers for open water swimming at the 2016 Olympic Games will participate in the official test event this weekend in Rio de Janeiro, but no Americans will be among them.

The United States’ three swimmers who will race at the Olympic Games (Haley Anderson, Jordan Wilimovsky, and Sean Ryan) have all chosen to skip the event.

The races that will take place at Fort Copacabana and will be held on Saturday August 22nd (men’s event) and August 23rd (women’s event).

15 women and 18 men will compete in the event. The full start lists are below, with asterisks next to those swimmers who have already qualified for the Olympic Games.

WOMEN
GBR PAYNE Keri-Anne
JPN KIDA Yumi
CHN YU Shi
CAN HARDING Samantha
ITA BRUNI Rachele*
ARG BIAGIOLI Cecilia
GER HARLE Isabell*
FRA POU Lisa
FRA MULLER Aurelie*
BRA DA CUNHA Ana Marcela*
BRA OKIMOTO Poliana*
ECU CALDAS Nataly
BRA LEAL Julia
BRA JORGE Eduarda
BRA HASEGAWA Isabella
MEN
NED WEERTMAN Ferry*
IRE BRYAN Christopher
JPN HIRAI Yasunari
CAN WEINBERGER Richard*
CAN DESHARNAIS Xavier
ITA FEDERICO Vanelli*
CZE KUTNIK Jan
FRA OLIVIER Marc-Antoine*
HUN SZEKELYI Daniel
ARG BERTOLA Guillermo
GBR BURNELL Jack*
ITA RUFFINI Simone*
BRA DO CARMO Allan*
ECU ENDERICA Ivan
BRA VILLARINHO Diogo
BRA M HIORTA Matheus
BRA OLIVEIRA Elder
BRA OLIVEIRA David

 

The list includes the defending World Champion in the women’s 10k Auréle Muller. The men’s 10k World Champion, American Jordan Wilimovsky, is skipping the race. The only male World’s 10k medalist who will be racing is Dutch swimmer Ferry Weertmann.

Also racing will be Japan’s Yasunari Hirai, who was 11th at Worlds and will be a major contender to grab one of the 15 remaining spots for men at the Olympic Games.

While this Olympic test event is designed to both test facilities and simultaneously to give athletes an opportunity to experience the venues and in this case the race course.

Several reports have come out about the quality of water where the open water, sailing, rowing, and other water-based events are to be held in Rio indicating that there is a potential health risk to athletes. That wasn’t enough to postpone the test event, however, after FINA president Julio Maglione said that water quality is “not a big problem at the moment) two weeks ago.

USA Swimming says that the decision to compete at the test event was up to the individual athletes.

“USA Swimming has spoken with the athletes about the water situation in Rio, from what we know from news reports and through conversations with the USOC,” a spokesperson said. “The ultimate decision on whether to attend is determined by the athlete.”

5
Leave a Reply

Subscribe
Notify of
5 Comments
oldest
newest most voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
bobo gigi
5 years ago

It’s wise.

Swimfan
5 years ago

This won’t happen, but all events using this venue should be moved to a “safe” venue outside the arena where the water conditions don’t contain contaminants being reported regardless of what the IOC leadership says. It is known that the IOC is only interested in trying to replicate the success and profits of the 1984 Olympics, which hasn’t been done since, when Rio was selected. Weren’t these conditions reviewed as part of the overall bid process? And why did the IOC “rely” on the RIO Olympic Committee’s promises to clean up the venue of contaminants when in all likelihood nothing was going to change to in the run up to the Games. To put athletes in potential health peril is… Read more »

aquajosh
5 years ago

Why people like Ferry Weertman and Aurelie Muller who already have Olympics berths guaranteed would compete in this event is beyond me. They’d better hope they don’t end up like Kalyn Keller, whose swimming career was ended by Crohn’s Disease believed to have been triggered by the crappy water conditions at the 2007 Pan Ams in Brazil.

About Braden Keith

Braden Keith

Braden Keith is the Editor-in-Chief and a co-founder of SwimSwam.com. He first got his feet wet by building The Swimmers' Circle beginning in January 2010, and now comes to SwimSwam to use that experience and help build a new leader in the sport of swimming. Aside from his life on the InterWet, …

Read More »