Michael Andrew Goes 1:45.1, Breaks 200 Back National Age Group Record

Michael Andrew has an uncanny knack for breaking National Age Group Records in threes. He did it at Winter Juniors, and he did it at the College Station Sectional last weekend. Along that vein, the young 14-year old had broken his third National-Age Group Record of the 2014 Jenks Sectional meet.

He swam a 1:45.14 in the 200 yard backstroke on Sunday evening which broke the 2013 record set by PEAK’s Benjamin Ho at 1:45.73 almost exactly a year ago.

The comparative splits:

Ho ’13 – 24.69/26.53/27.12/27.39 = 1:45.73
Andrew ’14 – 24.85/26.62/26.68/26.69 = 1:45.14

Andrew’s closing speed was impeccable in this race, and his splitting – in true USRPT fashion – was spot on, with a pair of 26.6 splits after his opening 50, followed by a 26.9.

Earlier in the meet, Andrew also broke National Age Group Records in the 50 free and in the 100 breast.

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TJ
7 years ago

You’ve got to be joking

swimzlazy
7 years ago

Very impressive. He is now proving his ability to become a star on the world stage in a few years. I do think he should implement stretching and dry land work into his training program next year a few days a week. I think this will pay off dividends for his flexibility and power coming off the walls in particular. That is one area that Salo disagrees with the USRPT philosophy (no dry land).

He should have no problem taking down the 200 breast the next time he swims it and possible to 2 free as well.

DRUKSTOP
7 years ago

Funny how at meets he only breaks NAG’s in trios.

coacherik
Reply to  DRUKSTOP
7 years ago

Care to elaborate?

Ben
Reply to  coacherik
7 years ago

the last 4 or 5 times I can remember seeing posts about him its because he broke three records in a single meet

Peterdavis
Reply to  Ben
7 years ago

Clearly the ‘Rule of 3’ is in play here….(and not the one from coding c++, but the one that keeps Hollywood awake at night)…

Michael Jackson, Billy Mays, 13-14 200 IM NAG

Heath Ledger, Amy Winehouse, 13-14 100 free NAG

Gary Coleman, Dennis Hopper, 13-14 200 back NAG

David Carradine, American Exceptionalism, 13-14 100 breast NAG

Terrell Owens, Newt Gingrich, 13-14 200 free NAG.

Whoops, forget that last one, just came back from the future w/my hover board.

Ben
Reply to  Peterdavis
7 years ago

obviously “rule” is a strong word. It is something interesting that has happened a few times. While we are on the subject though what happened to Terrell Owens? steroid related issues I’m assuming

Peterdavis
Reply to  Peterdavis
7 years ago

You must ducking, because that was flying pretty low, and still went over your head. *whoosh*

Steve Nolan
7 years ago

OK, now this is just gettin’ ridiculous. 50 free, 100 breast and 200 back? Hokay!

(Though, just saying – the people that gush about this kid make me wish he’d crash and burn, but those that think he’s overrated, just “big and strong” make me want him to keep smashing these records. I’m very conflicted, you see.)

Kevin T
Reply to  Steve Nolan
7 years ago

Right, it’s like there is no specialty for this young man. He specializes in whatever he wants to on any given day! I love it. It’s truly a rare thing to be great in so many different strokes/events.

I notice though he doesn’t recover well. He always has a great swim in his first event, then the next event of the evening he doesn’t do all that great (relatively speaking, of course).

So now he has the NAG record in the 50 and 100 free, 1 and 2 fly, 1 and 2 back, 1 breast, 2 and 4 im. That leaves just a few short weeks for him to go for the NAG records in the 2 free… Read more »

Kevin T.
7 years ago

Look at how ripped he is! He is a beast! A machine!

swimfan
7 years ago

I think this kid is fast and is super talented. But does anybody think he is putting to much time and energy into shattering the 13-14 NAG’s. He seems to swim a meet every single weekend, I know that his training method is USRPT and he is ready to swim fast all the time. He has to eventually burn out and have injuries right? Im not putting him down just asking the obvious parent questions.

swimfan
Reply to  Braden Keith
7 years ago

Braden Keith-

I agree that breaking records has never hurt anyone. And as a kid breaking a record is an awesome achievement, and what he is doing is amazing and fun to watch.

In 4-8 years (age 18-22) when things really count and he reaches the highest level of competition, will he be able to keep up this level of training?

To me it seems more important to have long term success in swimming compared to short term immediate success. Will this strive for 13-14 NAG’s hurt his long term career or is this just the beginning of another Phelps?

Reply to  swimfan
7 years ago

I’m pretty sure he’s gonna be able to do two 45 minute workouts a day in the coming years. In fact, he’s got a lot of room for MORE… more than kids doing doubles of 90 and 120 minutes already.

Josh Davis
Reply to  swimfan
7 years ago

He just started doing USRPT 50’s about a month ago to get ready to break some more 200 records and 400IM. I don’t think he’s going to burn out and get injuries because he’s switching from 25’s to 50’s:)

He can totally go faster. When I was 26 years old my 100 back was 48.0 and my 200 back was 1:42.1 and that was with no dolphin kicks. So he will drop down easily over the next couple of years. You don’t burn out when you have so much to look forward to.

In my 25 year experience the things that cause injuries is non relevant swim race activities like dry land, running, shoulder injuries from overtraining and poor… Read more »

Satchmo
Reply to  Josh Davis
7 years ago

what does a typical warm up look like for him at a practice or meet? i’m so used to seeing swimmers do over 2 grand plus at meets.

and a question about kicking: you said there is no specific kick sets, but have they implemented underwater dolphin kicking yet into their workouts? the scary part about Michael Andrew’s development is that it is clear he still has a ton of room for improvement in his underwaters. watch out when he makes strides in that area,

Peterdavis
Reply to  Satchmo
7 years ago

In my opinion, Satchmo, your trumpet is playing the right tune.

My question, exactly, about Michael and his training regimen(which, unfortunately, I never got around to asking Peter), was how does he ‘train’ for meet prep? As coaches, it has always been a huge part of our jobs to prepare athletes for the grueling 5-10k+ a day meet schedule of wu/wd/individuals/relays. If we were more like track, competing in 1 event, maybe 2-3 times over a few days, then a full drop taper down to 1+-k per day for a week or more could get an athlete prepped to be lights out, but only for a few performances, max. Is this wrong-headed? We have already shifted to more dynamic… Read more »

swim1
Reply to  Peterdavis
7 years ago

Peter
I always wondered why we have swimmers compete 15 times (with 2nd swims and relays) when H.S., college and national level swimmers generally don’t do that at champs meets. Generally, they do 1 individual event and one relay per day – maybe 2 individuals. Why are we subjecting and training swimmers for anything else? Just a thought….

Matt Salzberg
Reply to  swimfan
7 years ago

He’s an age grouper. We keep forgetting that he is just 14. When you were 14 you were probably going to meets nearly every weekend too. It just so happens that since he doesn’t taper cause of his training he can go those best times all the time. And again, his best times just so happen to be NAGs a lot. It’s like when phelps kept breaking WRs, but to him it was just best times.

7 years ago

Michael’s swims are astonishing. If there’s such thing as astonishment fatigue, I haven’t reached it yet. Seems like we could do a better job of listening and learning rather than constantly offering advice.

Peter and Tina are brilliant. They’re not loners: they’re EXPLORERS. (Big difference.) Peter is fully aware of underwater dolphin kick’s importance. Give the man a little more credit! They just haven’t focused on it yet. They’re working on other things right now that they probably have decide are more important at this stage. Imagine knowing that that low hanging fruit will be there when they turn their attention to killer SDKs.

I’m looking forward to the slo-mo of this race. While people have been nit picking invisible… Read more »

John
Reply to  David Morrow Guthrie
7 years ago

Couldn’t agree more David. I went through the same thing and got away with eating junk food. if only I ate well when I was younger – would have loved to have seen my times then! Is he doing anything special in his diet or does he just stay of junk food?

Reply to  John
7 years ago

Tina is very informed and focused on nutrition, drilling down into the details, always gathering information. Any parent knows that getting a 14 year old to eat certain things can be a challenge. :v) They sometimes juice to make a palatable high nutrition pre-workout breakfast. P2Life supplements are a key part of their nutritional plan. They found P2Life when Tina went searching for supplements that are safe, that are certified to be free of banned substances, because she recognized the risk of taking tainted supplements. (25% of supplements sold contain banned substances!)

Aquaman
7 years ago

Great job Michael, but did anybody notice Molacek’s 400 fr relay split? 18.68″ first 50 and 41.55″- can that be real? WOW!!!

Reply to  Braden Keith
7 years ago

Still… Wow… SMASH

About Braden Keith

Braden Keith

Braden Keith is the Editor-in-Chief and a co-founder of SwimSwam.com. He first got his feet wet by building The Swimmers' Circle beginning in January 2010, and now comes to SwimSwam to use that experience and help build a new leader in the sport of swimming. Aside from his life on the InterWet, …

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