Jaeger Goes 14:29 In Exhibition 1650 At Michigan First Chance Meet

American record-holder Connor Jaeger blasted the fastest 1650 freestyle of the year 2016 in an exhibition swim at the Michigan First Chance Meet in Ann Arbor.

The meet is serving as a taper meet for many of the Wolverine team members who are not competing at the Big Ten Championships, and is also featuring several swimmers from Note Dame and Toledo. And in between the official sessions of the meet, some of Michigan’s professional group members are taking a turn to shine in the short course pool.

Jaeger actually went under the Michigan pool record with his swim, going 14:29.94 – that swim will be “unofficial” pool record. It’s also just outside the top 10 performances of all-time, and would rank Jaeger as the 11th-fastest performer in history if he didn’t already hold the American record at 14:23.52.

Also coming up big in exhibition swims was Japanese backstroker Junya Koga, who set an unofficial pool record in the 100 back with a blistering 45.08. That’s also just outside the top 10 swims ever, and only two tenths off Koga’s short course best of 44.8.

Koga was also 19.08 in a 50 free, according to Michigan coach Mike Bottom.

As for the college swimmers, the most notable performances came from Michigan freshman Mokhtar Al-Yamani. The rookie, also from Japan, smashed his lifetime-bests in the 200 and 500 frees. The 200 was probably his best swim, clocking in at 1:34.77. He was also 4:22.83, a great sign for a Michigan program that has been outstanding in the 200 and 500 over the past few years.

Sophomore Ryan Sebastian won the 200 IM in 1:47.60 and the 400 IM in 3:49.58. And junior Colin Eaton had a pair of wins, going 48.44 in the 100 fly and 20.12 in the 50 free.

Full results available here. The meet continues Sunday morning.

Full results of Club Wolverine’s Pro Group is here.

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paolo
6 years ago

Interesting discussion..

1) What still have to do Gregorio Paltrinieri to be considered (until now) as THE (not A, like Joel Lin wrote) real favorite for the1500 free at Rio? A tremendous consistency and continuos improvements in the last two years (European champ and World champ).: 14.39.67 at Kazan and, last December, 14.08.06, new SC WR (and Paltrinieri is far stronger in LC not only because of his subpar walls, but because of his impressive swimming progression upon every 50m).

2) Sun Yang is a real question mark, above all in the 1500 free. And the last injury he suffered, adds doubts about his capability to train, to get ready for a 1500 free at his maximum level.

Connor Jaeger… Read more »

carlo
6 years ago

It,s gonna be between sun yang and paltrinieri but I suspect paltrinieri will get the gold. Not sure of the wr though.

Ok
6 years ago

Using this converter: http://www.csi.org/coursealti.aspx
I get paltrinieris world record as 14:14.96 in yards, if that’s accurate paltrinieri is way ahead of Jaeger in short course, Rio can’t come sooner if sun, Jaeger, and Paltrinieri all show up!!

completelyconquered
Reply to  Ok
6 years ago

Not really an accurate conversion for Paltrinieri since he has terrible walls.

xenon
6 years ago

I fell so dirty about this. I wish this mattered. Go Paltrinieri!

Rafael
6 years ago

And paltrinieri forgets how to swim BO

Joel Lin
Reply to  Rafael
6 years ago

No doubt Paltrinieri is a favorite, but there are some with the ability to swim with him in a 1500m. Jaeger has the talent and the grit to be right in it in Rio. I’ll admit I root against Sun Yang, but he is the standard now for the other guys to meet.

Sebastian
6 years ago

So what’s it take for Michigan guys to make the big ten team if he went a 1:34?

bo
6 years ago

The only way he wins is if Sun Yang fails a dope test. Oh wait that already got swept under the rug

Joel Lin
6 years ago

He can win. He can beat Sun Yang. He’s capable against the Italian stud too.

About Jared Anderson

Jared Anderson

Jared Anderson swam for nearly twenty years. Then, Jared Anderson stopped swimming and started writing about swimming. He's not sick of swimming yet. Swimming might be sick of him, though. Jared was a YMCA and high school swimmer in northern Minnesota, and spent his college years swimming breaststroke and occasionally pretending …

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