2014 Pan Pacific Championships – Day 2 live prelims recap – loaded 100 frees lined up for finals

  171 Jared Anderson | August 21st, 2014 | Africa, Asia, Australia, Brazil, Latin America & Caribbean, Canada, Featured, International, News, Previews & Recaps

Day 2 prelims of the 2014 Pan Pacific Championships get underway from Australia shortly. Stay tuned to this page for live updates, event-by-event, plus probable top-8 lists based on the Pan Pacs policy of only entering two swimmers from any given country into each event’s A final.

This morning (or evening for those in the West), we’ve got the 100 breast, 100 free and 400 IM on tap for each gender.

2014 Pan Pacific Championships

Women’s 100 breast

Meet record: 1:04.93, Rebecca Soni (USA)
American record: 1:04.45, Jessica Hardy
Australian record:1:05.09, Leisel Jones
Canadian record: 1:05.74, Annamay Pierse
Japanese record:1:05.88, Kanako Watanabe
Australia All-comers record: 1:05.09, Leisel Jones

Japan’s Kanako Watanabe is the top seed in the women’s 100 breast, getting within a second of her own national record. Watanabe was 1:06.83 this morning, riding the field’s best back-half split to an inside lane.

Just a tenth behind is American Jessica Hardy, who swam a very different race. Hardy went out in 31.1, the field’s best front-half, and finished in 1:06.94. Just a tenth back of her was teammate Breeja Larson at 1:07.06.

Australia nabbed the next two spots, with Taylor McKeown going 1:07.48 and Lorna Tonks 1:07.51.

The third U.S. swimmer was co-national champion Micah Lawrence, who fell to 1:07.54 and will be relegated to the B final, based on the Pan Pacs 2-swimmers-per-team rule. Satomi Suzuki of Japan takes her spot in the A heat at 1:07.59, but her teammate Rie Kaneto will head to the B flight after putting up a 1:07.97, good for 8th this morning.

Sally Hunter of Australia was 1:08.13, but she’s kicked out of the final because of McKeown and Tonks, so a pair of Canadians will round out the championship heat. That’s Kierra Smith (1:08.64) and Martha McCabe (1:09.19).

Probable A-finalists:

  1. Kanako Watanabe (JPN) – 1:06.83
  2. Jessica Hardy (USA) – 1:06.94
  3. Breeja Larson (USA) – 1:07.06
  4. Taylor McKeown (AUS) – 1:07.48
  5. Lorna Tonks (AUS) – 1:07.51
  6. Satomi Suzuki (JPN) – 1:07.59
  7. Kierra Smith (CAN) – 1:08.64
  8. Martha McCabe (CAN) – 1:09.19

Men’s 100 breast

Meet record: 59.04, Kosuke Kitajima (JPN)
American record: 58.96, Eric Shanteau
Australian record: 58.58, Brenton Rickard
Canadian record: 59.85, Scott Dickens
Japanese record: 58.90, Kosuke Kitajima
Australia All-comers record: 58.87, Christian Sprenger (AUS)

The men’s 100 breast will be the first event so far unaffected by the 2-per-team rule, at least in the top 8. The leader is American Kevin Cordes, always a fast prelims swimmer. Cordes was 59.70, just under his lifetime-best. The big question for the 21-year-old Cordes is if he can follow a big prelims swim with an equally strong finals one, something he struggled to do at U.S. Nationals.

He’ll have to be fast to medal, as Brazilian Felipe Silva is right on his tail. Silva was also sub-minute, going 59.92 to grab lane 5 in the final.

Back a little ways is Japan’s Yasuhiro Koseki, who just missed the minute-mark at 1:00.20. New Zealand’s Glenn Snyders gives his country a finalist to root for tonight, going 1:00.41 to finish fourth.

Australia’s Jake Packard is the top seed from the host nation. His 1:00.44 is just behind his Oceanian rival. Next came the second American, Nicolas Fink, at 1:00.72 and the closely named Richard Funk at 1:00.82. Japan’s Naoya Tomita is the 8th finisher and the 8th seed into finals with a 1:01.11.

Probable A-finalists:

  1. Kevin Cordes (USA) – 59.70
  2. Felipe Silva (BRA) – 59.91
  3. Yasuhiro Koseki (JPN) – 1:00.20
  4. Glenn Snyders (NZ) – 1:00.41
  5. Jake Packard (AUS) 1:00.44
  6. Nic Fink (USA) – 1:00.72
  7. Richard Funk (CAN) – 1:00.82
  8. Naoya Tomita (JPN) – 1:01.11

Women’s 100 free

Meet record: 53.67, Natalie Coughlin (USA)
American record: 53.02, Amanda Weir
Australian record: 52.33, Cate Campbell
Canadian record: 54.08, Erica Morningstar
Japanese record: 54.00, Haruka Ueda
Australia All-comers record: 52.68, Cate Campbell

Cate Campbell has been on a tear this season, and in front of her home crowd, it was a safe bet she’d come out with something big in this 100 free. Campbell didn’t disappoint in the prelims, blowing away the field with a 52.62 that cracks the meet and All-comers records.

She’s the top seed by almost a full second, as Australia went 1-2-3 in this event. There’s a reason they broke the world record in the 4×100 free relay a few weeks ago, and it was on full display on the Gold Coast. Cate’s younger sister Bronte was 53.50 for the second seed, also getting under the old meet record (she actually held the record for all of one heat before Cate took it back). 27-year-old Mel Schlanger was third in 53.65, also under the meet mark, but she’ll be relegated to the B heat tonight.

American Missy Franklin led the American contingent, going 53.75. She had a huge finals swim in the 200 free, so watch for her in the final, though the top two Australians look very tough. Joining Franklin will be Simone Manuel. Manuel was 53.91, and the 18-year-old will swim on the other side of the Campbell sisters in the final.

The entire top 8 was composed of Americans and Australians. Brittany Elmslie may have earned her spot on the Australians relay by going 54.29 for 6th. She’s well off Emma McKeon’s best, but McKeon slid to 11th and won’t get another shot at the final.

The next two Americans were 17-year-old Abbey Weitzeil (54.50) and Shannon Vreeland (54.55). Weitzeil will get the American B final spot in her first Pan Pacs finals appearance.

Probable A-finalists:

  1. Cate Campbell (AUS) – 52.62
  2. Bronte Campbell (AUS) – 53.50
  3. Missy Franklin (USA) – 53.75
  4. Simone Manuel (USA) – 53.91
  5. Chantal Van Landeghem (CAN) – 54.73
  6. Miki Uchida (JPN) – 54.86
  7. Victoria Poon (CAN) – 55.06
  8. Camille Cheng (HK) – 55.45

Men’s 100 free

Meet record: 48.13, Michael Phelps (USA)
American record: 47.33, David Walters
Australian record: 47.05, Eamon Sullivan
Canadian record: 47.27, Brent Hayden
Japanese record: 48.49, Takuro Fujii
Australia All-comers record: 47.10, James Magnussen (AUS)

It’s a clash of titans in the men’s 100 free, and Olympic gold medalist Nathan Adrian came out on top, for prelims at least. Adrian went 48.05 to beat 2013 World Champs gold medalist James Magnussen for the top seed. Both swam in the final heat of the preliminaries. Magnussen was 48.25, but both men will likely get into the 47s by finals tonight. That time for Adrian is a meet record.

Also notable was a big swim from American icon Michael Phelps. Phelps rolled to a win in the first of the circle-seeded heats, going 48.45 to claim third overall and the second American spot. Australia’s second slot goes to youngster Cameron McEvoy, the other circle-seed heat winner in 48.49.

Ryan Lochte was 5th in 48.90. He’ll miss the A final, but earned a spot in the B heat and should make the U.S. relay with his swim.

Brazil’s Joao de Lucca just missed a 48-second swim, but still makes the final with a 49.02. He’ll jump into that heat along with countryman Nicolas Oliveira (8th in 49.13). Ahead of Oliveira was Anthony Ervin of the U.S., who will miss both finals but should make the U.S. relay after going 49.11. Australia’s Matt Abood heads to the B heat after tying with Oliveria at 49.13.

Probable A-finalists:

  1. Nathan Adrian (USA) – 48.05
  2. James Magnussen (AUS) – 48.25
  3. Michael Phelps (USA) – 48.45
  4. Cameron McEvoy (AUS) – 48.49
  5. Joao de Lucca (BRA) – 49.02
  6. Nicolas Oliveira (BRA) – 49.13
  7. Katsumura Nakamura (JPN) – 49.30
  8. Shinri Shioura (JPN) – 49.53

Women’s 400 IM

Meet record: 4:34.04 Elizabeth Beisel (USA)
American record: 4:31.12, Katie Hoff
Australian record: 4:29.45, Stephanie Rice
Canadian record: 4:35.84, Tanya Hunks
Japanese record: 4:35.69, Miho Takahashi
Australia All-comers record: 4:31.46, Stephanie Rice

The women’s 400 IM was dominated by the USA and Japan, as those two combined for 9 of the top 10 spots. American Elizabeth Beisel is the leader, going 4:36.89 to take the top seed. Beisel is the reigning meet record-holder in the event, and has had a great season in her first since graduating college. She’ll have to contend with her longtime rival/teammate Maya DiRado, who won the other fast heat with a 4:37.53 and sits second.

Australia’s only entry was Keryn McMaster, who went 4:38.72 for third place. Fron there it was all Japan and the U.S. Sakiko Shimizu was 4:40.64, followed by American Melanie Margalis, who will lead the B heat after a 4:41.72. Also out of the final is 200 fly gold medalist Cammile Adams (4:42.09). Japan’s Miho Takahashi went 4:42.52 and will join the championship heat.

With only one Australian entered in the event, things got pretty spread out to make the A final. In fact, only 17 swimmers entered and it took all the way down to the final finisher to fill out the A heat for tonight. The top two Canadians got in: Emily Overholt at 4:45.89 and Erika Seltenreich-Hodgson at 4:50.42. Then things went all the way down to 17th-place Ziyi Chen, the 17-year-old Chinese swimmer, to take the final lane in the championship heat for finals.

Probable A-finalists:

  1. Elizabeth Beisel (USA) – 4:36.89
  2. Maya DiRado (USA) – 4:37.53
  3. Keryn McMaster (AUS) – 4:38.72
  4. Sakiko Shimizu (JPN) – 4:40.64
  5. Miho Takahashi (JPN) – 4:42.52
  6. Emily Overholt (CAN) – 4:45.89
  7. Erika Seltenreich-Hodgson (CAN) – 4:50.42
  8. Ziyi Chen (CHN) – 5:00.80

Men’s 400 IM

Meet record: 4:07.59, Ryan Lochte (USA)
American record: 4:03.84, Michael Phelps
Australian record: 4:10.14, Thomas Fraser-Holmes
Canadian record: 4:11.41, Brian Johns
Japanese record: 4:07.61, Kosuke Hagino
Australia All-comers record: 4:06.22, Michael Phelps (USA)

With just two heats of the men’s 400 IM, there were some pretty good preliminary races in setting up the final. The second heat brought out most of the fireworks, with Japanese duo Kosuke Hagino and Daiya Seto swimming their way to the top two seeds in a pair of 4:11s. Hagino went 4:11.48 for the top seed, leading narrowly the whole way. Seto settled for second in 4:11.74, and is the second seed for tonight.

Third in that heat was American Chase Kalisz, the third overall seed in 4:13.12. Kalisz was out a bit slower, but hit the back 200 hard to nip teammate Tyler Clary, the winner of the first heat. Clary went 4:13.88 and sits fourth.

After that were a pair of Japanese swimmer and a pair of US swimmers, all of whom will be bumped from the A final. Takehashi Fujimori was 4:13.95 and will swim the B final, while Hiromasa Fujimori went 4:13.95. Hiromasa would have missed a B final spot, but will have the opportunity to swim again as there are only 16 swimmers in the event. Meanwhile Michael Weiss claimed the first B final spot for the Americans with a 4:16.60 while Josh Prenot was just behind in 4:16.62. He’ll also get a chance at another swim if he wants it.

Australia’s Thomas Fraser-Holmes is the 5th finals seed, putting up a 4:18.41 this morning. He’lll be joined by South Africa’s Michael Meyer, Australia’s Travis Mahoney and 18-year-old Canadian Luke Reilly.

Probable A-finalists:

  1. Kosuke Hagino (JPN) – 4:11.48
  2. Daiya Seto (JPN) – 4:11.74
  3. Chase Kalisz (USA) – 4:13.12
  4. Tyler Clary (USA) – 4:13.88
  5. Thomas Fraser-Holmes (AUS) – 4:18.41
  6. Michael Meyer (RSA) – 4:18.89
  7. Travis Mahoney (AUS) – 4:19.12
  8. Luke Reilly (CAN) – 4:21.39

In This Story

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171 Comments on "2014 Pan Pacific Championships – Day 2 live prelims recap – loaded 100 frees lined up for finals"


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swimmer24
2 years 1 month ago

Is there a live stream tonight? And if so how do I get it to work this time.

SVIRD
2 years 1 month ago
SVIRD
2 years 1 month ago

Kevin Cordes 59.7! And that’s with an atrocious start! Hopefully he performs in finals.

SVIRD
2 years 1 month ago

Cordes and Fink for USA. Miller only 1:01.54. It’s def Cordes for the relay imo.

Zanna
2 years 1 month ago

Swimswam,
Please post this recap page half an hour before prelims and not half an hour after prelims. A bunch of people has already commented in another post.

Lane Four
2 years 1 month ago

Please take note, SwimSwam.

Thanos
2 years 1 month ago

Let’s hope that he can put the blinders and focuses on just lane 4

Rafael
2 years 1 month ago

Cordes have a serious issue when not racing far ahead.. if felipe open with his top speed Cordes will probably loses all self control..

Justin Thompson
2 years 1 month ago

I don’t think he’s too concerned with Felipe, but that may happen with some of the other swimmers 🙂

Rafael
2 years 1 month ago

I don´t think Felipe has the means to go sub-59.. but It looks like whenever Cordes see somone at his side or at front ( and Felipe has at least the front speed to be first on 50) he loses control of his swim

pvdh
2 years 1 month ago

cordes should just close his eyes and rely on stroke count until the turn and then close them after the turn again

Justin Thompson
2 years 1 month ago

And if he swam like he did at NATs this morning swim will be faster than the evening, but I hope he pulls through. Should be a good race tonight.

SVIRD
2 years 1 month ago

Cate Campbell looks unbeatable. 52.62!

Lane Four
2 years 1 month ago

The last female 100 swimmer to open up a body length on the field was Kornelia Ender back in 1976.

thomaslurzfan
2 years 1 month ago

Thanks for reminding me of her, she was truly an amazing athlete, but i prefer kristin otto. Ender won 4 gold medals in 1976, all in world record times, in addition to that she broke 32 individual world records and at 1972 olympic games she won 3 silver medals as a 13 yo (germanys youngest athlete at olympic games ever).
Btw: She was married to roland matthes.

aswimfan
2 years 1 month ago

It’s a pity that all of her achievements have asterisk marks on them.

I think she was extremely talented and yet we never know how good she’d become without all those ‘roids.

thomaslurzfan
2 years 1 month ago

You could say the same about every other swimmer, so i dont really care about her being doped or not, its just business as usual.

NickH
2 years 1 month ago

And Cate Campbell just throws down a super fast prelims swim. Wow.

Philip Johnson
2 years 1 month ago

Faster than the final in Glasgow

2 years 1 month ago

Gave up on the Australian feed. Sniff, sniff.

In other matters, why the “no comments” on the IAN THORPE EXCLUSIVE SWIMSWAM ADIDAS VIDEO INTERVIEW? Probably because the Adidas “interview” seemed just like one of those “promoted” tweets on Twitter (insipid). And usually people mostly lampoon those promoted tweets in the comments section. I guess I answered my own question.

anon
2 years 1 month ago

don’t give up! i just got on! took about 20 minutes…but worth it!

Lazy Observer
2 years 1 month ago

Agreed. I would much rather it read “Ian Thorpe advises young swimmers on managing sponsorship relationships.” Of course, that might not get many clicks, but it seems more honest.

Justin Thompson
2 years 1 month ago

This outdoor venue looks like its working out great with the weather. Hopefully the GOAT brought some Under Armour to stay warm.

Philip Johnson
2 years 1 month ago

For the record, that’s faster than what she swam at Common Wealths.

Rafael
2 years 1 month ago

And the australian will down the WR again this time probably

Lane Four
2 years 1 month ago

I swear, this live feed is enough to make you cry, pull out your hair and then throw the computer into the wall.

Justin Thompson
2 years 1 month ago

Live feed working like a champ in the Pacific Northwest here in the US.

Lane Four
2 years 1 month ago

I always wanted to move to Seattle. Now I have a reason.

anon
2 years 1 month ago

my problem with the feed was actually getting it to start (as in the website actually loading!)…but once that’s done…I haven’t had much of a problem…and no random cutting of the stream… i do have very fast internet (20+mbps)…which probably helps though

anon
2 years 1 month ago

I stand corrected…let my computer fall asleep during the middle of the 4IM..now i keep on getting that stupid “oops your video is not where you left it…let’s try to find it…” that just keeps on reloading…and failing…

:/ gahhh

pvdh
2 years 1 month ago

Koga doing 100 free 😀

Philip Johnson
2 years 1 month ago

The depth of the Aussie women in the 100 free is scary. Yet another reason FINA should dump the 2 person per nation rule.

Rafael
2 years 1 month ago

With the rule being dumped.. the classification times would become faster.. for all the world.. and some swimmers will be locked out.. due to crazy depths like US 100 back, australia 100 free, Bra and US 50 free and so on..

Philip Johnson
2 years 1 month ago

That’s what we want: faster swimming.

Dee
2 years 1 month ago

How do you explain that to new viewers

mcgillrocks
2 years 1 month ago

You say these are the Olympics, there are the fastest swimmers in the World. America, Japan and Australia are very good at swimming so 1/2 the swimmers are from those countries. San Marino does not have many good swimmers, and they were not fast enough to qualify for the hardest meet in the world.

Dee
2 years 1 month ago

No. America, Japan and Australia can AFFORD to be good at swimming. They do not have a gene to magically make them better than an Indian, Lithuanian or Egyptian etc.

anon
2 years 1 month ago

To play devil’s advocate, the 2 per country rule ironically does actually stifle swimming in the strongest countries, while simultaneously growing the sport in weaker countries… (weak/strong referring to strength of swimming of course). Some of the top athletes in the world will drop the sport when they realize they’re unable to beat their top two ranking teammates and make the olympic team, despite posting a time that is among the BEST in the world, thus leading to less competition.

Of course, an unlimited entry number for the olympics WILL significantly decrease visibility and popularity of the sport internationally. (though it’s important to note that MANY of the world’s best train in just a handful of countries, some even using their second citizenships in order to go to the Olympics, despite being born/raised in another country, i.e., US.)

It’s an interesting debate…and I certainly see both sides…probably still lean towards the 2 per country rule though…or maybe expand it to 3 per country? No country is good enough where it can completely sweep the stands in EVERY event…and changing from 2 to 3 won’t necessarily increase the number of countries represented in the overall medal count. Granted…this is more of an IOC matter…not FINA.

Jim C
2 years 1 month ago

The number was 3 up until 1980. With the US boycott, the Soviets were able to get the number reduced to 2 for swimming, but kept it at 3 for track and field.

In golf for each gender there can be up to 4 per country at the Olympics as long as they are ranked in the top 15 in the world. Basically the B standard used to be the C standard for one entry, the A standard used to be the B standard for 2 entries, and there was a higher A standard for three entries. This might have allowed maybe three or four additional swimmers such as Katie Ledecky in the 400m free in 2012 when her third place finish at Nationals would probably have been good enough to make the Olympics for any other country in the world.

thomaslurzfan
2 years 1 month ago

From an economic perspective it would still be stupid: Fewer countries competing -> Fewer people watching -> Less money for fina, so i think fina will never change it, which is good, no matter what you think about it.

mcgillrocks
2 years 1 month ago

Why is a it a tragedy if slower swimmers get replaced by faster swimmers?

Dee
2 years 1 month ago

You are missing the point.

The progress of swimming Internationally would be stifled. Example. Is swimming in Romania going to have any hope of progression if they see their best swimmers missing out because Fina wants to see 106 people from just 13 nations instead? Where do you draw the line? Top 32 in the world per event? How do you say “Yeah we know you are the best swimmer in Romania but you aren’t good enough to be here”.. It is nonsensical. It would do swimming powers like the US & Aus good but who else benefits? Certainly not the viewers… I’d be uncomfortable witnessing a WC final consisting of 5 Americans 2 Aussies and a Frenchman.

I think you are looking at this as an American with an abundance of talent to send.. that is what your National Championships are for. Scrapping 2 per nation would stifle talent development in smaller, poorer nations. Do we really want swimming to consist of the US, Europe, Aus etc.?

mcgillrocks
2 years 1 month ago

Look, I get that FINA wants a bigger sport with a broader base. But is the Olympics the best place to do it?

In what other sport are people who are not even world class allowed to compete in the biggest event? Are there two bonus sports in the NFL playoffs for European teams? Does the soccer world cup give bonus entries to countries who pledge to work really hard to develop the sport?

FINA can screw around with world if they want to promote growth. But let’s leave the amateurs (metaphorical amateurs, NCAA swimmers OK) out of the Olympics.

If FINA wants to develop the sport they should have a World Development Games, where countries that have never won an Olympic gold medal, have placed fewer than 2 podium places in the past 4 world championships or otherwise performed poorly for a long time could get to participate. The WDGs would be held in the year preceding the Olympics, and the winner in each event could get an entry into the Olympics. Give poorer/less successful countries a chance to showcase themselves at an appropriate meet, instead of having the biggest, fastest and best meet in the world features people who ranked 250+ in the world.

Dee
2 years 1 month ago

No, the world cup give host nation status to countries who pledge to work really hard boosting their coffers 😉

Yes, the world cup does. Qualification is split up into confederations.. this allows ‘poorer’ teams from Asia & Africa to qualify while ‘better’ teams miss out. Also – seedings favour nations from confeds where football standards are lower. Track & field allow ‘amateurs’, as do golf, quite literally.

Who would fund this “World development games”? Doubt too many corps would clamour for the rights. It is not feesable financially and possibly not logistically.

In Cycling the rule is 1 per nation. This was enforced after Britain were so dominant in 2008 taking 7 of the 10 TC golds including 3 1-2 finishes (2 per event). Swimmers should count themselves lucky 😉

The Olympic motto is “Faster, Higher, Stronger” on the basis that it is more Important to compete to the best of your ability and better yourself than to win. The point of the Olympics is to unite and promote. Your proposal goes 100% against that. The Olympics is the worlds biggest festival of elite sport, yes. It is also the worlds largest uniting of athletes from all over the globe of all abilities. The founding ‘

Boknows34
2 years 1 month ago

Track and Field at the Olympics allows 3 per nation. And the IAAF world championships allows the defending champion to automatically qualify without taking up an auto qualifying spot, so Jamaica can enter Usain Bolt and 3 other sprinters to the 100m.

There’s no reason why there can’t be a max of 3 per nation. Perhaps even allow a nation to add a 3rd swimmer if they are ranked in the world Top 10 for that event as a compromise.

Dee
2 years 1 month ago

Boknows,

I have no issue with 3 per nation. What I would say is swimmers have more opportunity to swim multiple events, 5 or 6 in some cases, than T&F so perhaps it makes sense for Track to have more spots per event. Most swimmers have 2 or three events minimum, many T&F athletes have one shot (PV/TJ/Hurdles etc.) And if they miss out that is it… if the rule was 2 per nation that’d be exremely stringent.

As I said, my issue is with the “top 50” criteria attitude. OG are about welcoming athletes of differing abilities, not just the best in the world.

2 years 1 month ago

I guess that’s why the 4×100 free relay was invented: for a country to showcase its depth of 100 free swimmers!

But your point is well taken.

pvdh
2 years 1 month ago

PHELPS UP

Lane Four
2 years 1 month ago

This heat is LOADED

Justin Thompson
2 years 1 month ago

A GOAT siting on the deck!

pvdh
2 years 1 month ago

PHELPS 48.45!!!

Justin Thompson
2 years 1 month ago

No question he’ll be on that 4×100 relay with that time and also had a solid turn.

We Love Phelps
2 years 1 month ago

yep! LOVED IT 😀
Go MP

Justin Thompson
2 years 1 month ago

The GOAT tearing it up!

ML
2 years 1 month ago

Live feed gave out just as Phelps’s heat came up.

Lane Four
2 years 1 month ago

The pressure is on Lochte

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About Jared Anderson

Jared Anderson

Jared Anderson just can’t stay away from the pool. A competitive career sixteen years and running wasn’t enough for this native Minnesotan, who continues to get his daily chlorine fix. A lifelong lover of writing, Jared now combines the two passions as Senior Reporter for SwimSwam.com, covering swimming at every …

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