Wenpan Huang Downs S3 50 Free WR at Para Worlds Day 5


  • Saturday, December 2nd to Wednesday, December 7th
  • Francisco Marquez Olympic Swimming Pool, Mexico City
  • LCM
  • Meet info
  • Results

Like day four, day five of the 2017 Para Swimming World Championships kicked off with a win from the United State’s Tharon Drake, who went 1:15.70 for the win in the men’s SB11 100 breast. In the women’s race, China’s Xiaotong Zhang dropped a 1:26.14 to win the race by over 14 seconds, but was just over three seconds off her own World Record.

In the women’s SB13 100 breast, American Colleen Young went 1:17.21 to break her own meet record. Unites States teammates Becca Meyers and Gia Pergolini came in third and fifth in the race with a 1:26.43 and 1:37.46, respectively.

Jessica Long blasted a commanding performance in the women’s S8 400 free, going 5:01.57. In second was US teammate Julia Gaffney, in 5:26.51, who just edged out Vendula Duskova’s 5:26.55.

China’s Benying Liu set a new meet record in the men’s S2 200 free, going 4:02.72. In third place, Chile’s Alberto Abarza set new record for the Americas, going 4:10.77.

Wenpan Huang continued his stellar meet, breaking his own World Record in the S3 50 free, going 38.81. In second, Diego Lopez set a new Americas record, going 39.70. Additionally, in 8th, Youssef Elsayed set a new African record in 1:03.62.

In the men’s S14 100 back, American Lawrence Sapp took gold in 1:06.42.

In the S4 50 free, Italy’s Monica Boggioni took gold and set a new meet record in 38.79. In third, Jiao Cheng set a new Asian record, going 43.03.

Colombia’s Nelson Crispin, in the men’s S6 50 fly, dropped a new record for the Americas, going 30.82.

For the final record swim of the day, China’s Haijao Xu set a meet record in the men’s S8 100 fly, going 59.70. He’s now just about half a second off of teammate Maodong Song’s World Record.

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About Torrey Hart

Torrey Hart

Torrey is from Oakland, CA, and majors in Media Studies and American Studies at Claremont McKenna College. When she's not writing about swimming or baseball, you can probably find her listening to a podcast or in a pool ... and/or watching Seinfeld, which she just realized is funny.

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