Can Chase Kalisz Defend His World Champ Titles? GMM presented by SwimOutlet.com

Gold Medal Minute presented by SwimOutlet.com

As World Champion and Olympic silver medalist Chase Kalisz will tell you, it’s not easy racing a 2Fly/2IM double in the span of a one hour. However, he came out victorious in both at the FINA Champions Series in Indy.  Chase is 25 now, and, according to him, he’s doing more hard work then ever before.  Coach Jack Bauerle is delivering honest work, training with an eye toward the 2020 Olympic Games.  Chase said, based on talks with Olympic peers, your overall career is about conserving emotional energy. You want to use it when the time is right, and the time is going to be 2020…  Chase is going into 2019 World Championships as prepared as he can be, but he could adjust some things that might, in his words, be more in tune with the following year.

2019 World Championships Predictions: 

Chase sweeps the 200 and 400 IM. PBs in both, inching closer toward Ryan Lochte and Michael Phelps‘ world records.

Chase Kalisz PBs:

200 IM – 1:55.40 – 2018 Pan Pacs

400 IM – 4:05.90 – 2017 World Champs

World Records:

200 IM – 1:54.0 – Lochte – 2011 World Champs (See all records here)

400 IM – 4:03.84  – Phelps – 2008 Olympic Games (See all records here)

What do you think?

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This is a Gold Medal Media production presented by SwimOutlet.com. Host Gold Medal Mel Stewart is a 3-time Olympic medalist and the co-founder of SwimSwam.com, a Swimming News website.

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PhillyMark
1 year ago

His attitude towards WC’s compared to Olympics is interesting. Definitely conveys emphasis placed on Olympic games

Confused
1 year ago

5hrs a night seems very little. How does he not get run into the ground?

ozsu
Reply to  Confused
1 year ago

Thought the same. Especially with the 400IM training. Missed the explanation on that.

OldFatSlow
Reply to  Confused
1 year ago

Good question. He might be well served to work on this.

ERVINFORTHEWIN
Reply to  Confused
1 year ago

some people manage 5 / night , some not . There is always room to extend his sleeping time if he needs to .

OPINION
Reply to  Confused
1 year ago

Not everyone needs the universal 8 hour of sleep or whatever. Maybe more sleep would help, maybe it wouldnt. Obviously he has the quality part down, just not the quantity. Maybe he just doesnt need a lot.

Anonymous
Reply to  OPINION
1 year ago

OMG SMH

bear drinks beer
1 year ago

Gold medal prediction from Gold Medal Mel again.

Cody miller’s Camera
Reply to  Gold Medal Mel Stewart
1 year ago

He spoke about “emotional energy” so he definitely is so much more focused on 2020 and using this year as sort of “make mistakes now” or “continue to prepare for 2020” . This “emotional energy” is probably what he still holds from 2016 not winning gold. Eh who knows , all I know is chase is going to drop a hammer on Seto !!!!

ERVINFORTHEWIN
Reply to  Cody miller’s Camera
1 year ago

agreed – he has not shown all his cards yet this year …..

Ol' Longhorn
Reply to  Gold Medal Mel Stewart
1 year ago

It just seems absurd to me to believe, from any sort of physiological sense, that one can only do a full taper for Olympics. Our sport is in the dark ages when it comes to considering peak performance. No other sport that I can think of believes this. Serena plays great every year, several times a year. Lebron same. The track athletes same. He’s doing a 4 min event max. It’s not like he’s training to climb the Himalayas prelims and finals.

SAMUEL HUNTINGTON
Reply to  Ol' Longhorn
1 year ago

agree 100%. These athletes should be able to swim fast several times a year.

Cheatin Vlad
Reply to  Ol' Longhorn
1 year ago

It would be interesting to see what impact tapering multiple times per year has on elite mid-distance swimmers. I don’t know if the comparison of tennis and basketball is fair since they aren’t endurance sports, but in track and field they seem to perform at a high caliber throughout the season.

Admin
Reply to  Cheatin Vlad
1 year ago

Average distance run in a basketball game by a full-time starter/star of a game: 2.5 miles. Average distance run in a tennis match – 3 miles (varies wildly by number of sets, male vs. female, surface). Given the jumps and arm activities in between…I wonder what it is about swimming for 4 minutes that we believe to be “endurance” but not about playing basketball or tennis. I’m not saying I disagree with the parsing, but I would be curious to hear how an exercise physiologist would differentiate these occasions.

Justin Thompson
Reply to  Braden Keith
1 year ago

I’m not an expert by any means, but it’s hard to compare. The basketball game or tennis match isn’t non stop. Sure, over the course of 2-3 hours they work hard and cover a lot of distance, but there are several breaks in between.

Admin
Reply to  Justin Thompson
1 year ago

So, physiologically, what makes something an “endurance sport”? What density of activity over what time qualifies? Does 4 minutes of swimming once, or maybe twice with 6 hours break, in a day really constitute an “endurance” sport?

Anecdotally, we know that once basketball teams get into the playoffs, they’re doing almost entirely “walkthroughs” and “shootarounds,” and rarely conditioning work. So, it seems that there are overlapping philosophies, even if they’re given different names.

About Gold Medal Mel Stewart

Gold Medal Mel Stewart

MEL STEWART Jr., aka Gold Medal Mel, won three Olympic medals at the 1992 Olympic Games. Mel's best event was the 200 butterfly. He is a former World, American, and NCAA Record holder in the 200 butterfly. As a writer/producer and sports columnist, Mel has contributed to Yahoo Sports, Universal Sports, …

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