Americans Withdraw From 10k Open Water At WUGs Due To Conditions

29TH WORLD UNIVERSITY GAMES (SUMMER UNIVERSIADE 2017)

USA Swimming has released a statement stating that they, along with the American coaches and the four swimmers slated to compete, have decided to withdraw their athletes from the 10k Open Water event at the World University Games being held in Taipei, Taiwan.

The statement cites high air and water temperatures as their reasoning. They go on to thank FISU and the local organizing committee for their planning of the event, and note that open water swimming has a number of variables and at the end of the day the safety of their swimmers is the #1 priority.

The swimmers slated to compete were Taylor AbbottDavid HeronKaty Campbell and Becca Mann.

Read the full statement below:

“Due to expected high air and water temperatures on race day, USA Swimming, the athletes and coaches came to a consensus that the four Americans scheduled to swim in the Aug. 2710-kilometer open water event at the 2017 World University Games in Taipei will not compete given the likely conditions.

 USA Swimming would like to thank FISU and the local organizing committee for their diligent work on developing an excellent course and safety plan for the event.

 As a sport, open water swimming presents a number of variables, including, in this instance, weather and water temperature. The safety of its athletes is USA Swimming’s No. 1 priority, and this decision was made after thorough examination of all available information.

 The four swimmers who qualified for the World University Games – Katy Campbell, Becca Mann, Taylor Abbott and David Heron – earned the right to represent Team USA on the international stage based on their performances at the 2017 Open Water National Championships, and USA Swimming will examine future international competitive opportunities for these athletes.”

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korn
4 years ago

What was the temperature of the water and the air?

KDSwim
Reply to  korn
4 years ago

This mornings air temp forecast for 9am is 91, but feels like 104! Forecast is similar next two day with highs of 96, so not much chance of water cooling.
USA swimming cut off is 85 water temp, FINA’s is a couple of degrees higher.

korn
Reply to  KDSwim
4 years ago

So what is the water temp? Thanks

taa
Reply to  korn
4 years ago

https://www.seatemperature.org/asia/taiwan/

click on the blue dots. Its 85-86 around Tawain. Keep in mind the temperature flucuates 2-3degrees depending on the time of day/night

Catherine
Reply to  taa
4 years ago

Here’s the site I go to: https://seatemperature.info/august/taipei-water-temperature.html. It says current water temperature for Taipei is 28C/82F. But it seems that temperatures shift around a bit according to highly localized rain or wind conditions so these could be off by several degrees. Anyone who has swum in the ocean or a large lake can attest to cold or warm water pockets.

KDSwim
Reply to  Catherine
4 years ago

The race is in the “Breeze Canal” in the city and this seems to be a small enclosed body of water and not very deep so not sure general sea temps would reflect temp of water at race site.

Taa
Reply to  KDSwim
4 years ago

Yeah they would most likely be a lot warmer. You have to wonder who planned this event and why aren’t the temperatures published and made available for competitors and coaches to see In the lead up to the race

KDSwim
Reply to  korn
4 years ago

I had heard water temp 85 and 86 from two unofficial measurements late last week and weekend.

Ex Quaker
4 years ago

Given what happened with Fran Crippen many years back, this could be understandable. I’d like to know the conditions and if any other countries have considered a similar decision.

ERVINFORTHEWIN
Reply to  Ex Quaker
4 years ago

Fair & square

E Gamble
4 years ago

There is nothing fun about swimming in hot water. ?

Cameron Wallace
Reply to  E Gamble
4 years ago

Precisely. A 200 free, at that…let alone a 10K ?

Swimswum
4 years ago

I like this decision. Swimming in hot water is extremely dangerous. Heat stroke is very real and when it comes to the water it is challenging to tell how much fluids you have lost. Add that with the competitive drive to succeed it’s dangerous. Good move by the coaches and USA swimming.

taa
4 years ago

I applaud the swimmers and coaches that honored Fran today by taking a stand for safety first.

ERVINFORTHEWIN
Reply to  taa
4 years ago

i love this too . well done Team Usa

Catherine
4 years ago

But will FINA cancel the 10K? I understand that FINA has an upper limit on water temperature of 31C but says nothing about the air temperature. I could see that even 29-30C temperatures combined with hot air temperatures could be just as bad as 31C combined with low air temperatures. For reference, my weather app says that air temperatures in Taipei have been 35-37C over the past few weeks. Not fun for open water.

marklewis
4 years ago

That’s a long way to go to a competition to not swim.

But if it’s that dangerous, better to cancel the race.

Cameron Wallace
Reply to  marklewis
4 years ago

It’s a lot of money to send them, and a lot of time to have sacrificed…however excuse the morbidity: but imagine being 6K in..knowing your family, friends, coaches, etc are watching/expecting of you, and being EXTREMELY overheated. Would they stop? Most wouldn’t..thinking (wrongly, of course) that they would be failing everyone. It’s priceless to adhere to safety; especially when there is an awful example of what could happen in that exact circumstance that should never, ever happen again

PerpetualAutumn
4 years ago

Do FINA rules govern an event planned by another governing body, in this case FISU? Does FISU have its own set of safety/technical rules, and if so, is there specifically an open water technical delegate involved or consulted in the planning for the combined sport of Swimming?

About James Sutherland

James Sutherland

James swam five years at Laurentian University in Sudbury, Ontario, specializing in the 200 free, back and IM. He finished up his collegiate swimming career in 2018, graduating with a bachelor's degree in economics. In 2019 he completed his graduate degree in sports journalism. Prior to going to Laurentian, James swam …

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