RACE VIDEO: Ryan Hoffer crushes 15-16 NAG in 100 fly at Winter Juniors

Watch Scottsdale 16-year-old Ryan Hoffer become the fastest 15-16 100 butterflyer in history in the video above. Hoffer is in lane 4.

As reported by SwimSwam’s Jared Anderson:

Boys 100 fly

  • Meet Record: 46.70 – Joseph Schooling, 2012
  • 11-12 NAG: 51.85 – Chas Morton, 1984
  • 13-14 NAG: 46.95 – Michael Andrew, 2014
  • 15-16 NAG: 46.99 – Alex Valente, 2014
  • 17-18 NAG: 44.91 – Tom Shields, 2010

A second-straight NAG record went down, this one going to Ryan Hoffer in the boys 100 fly. Hoffer, typically a sprint freestyler but known for his dominant underwaters, went 46.42 to smash a half-second off the 15-16 NAG set last year by Alex Valente.

Hoffer, who broke the 50 free record for 15-16s twice yesterday, could now wind up taking a NAG record each day of this meet, if he can better his own 100 free mark tomorrow.

He also takes the 15-16 mark back below the 13-14 mark – Michael Andrew made the younger age group record faster last season with his breakout 46.99. Andrew, now 15, was the runner-up in this event, going 47.38.

Upper Dublin’s Michael Jensen continued what’s been a strong meet for him, going 47.45 to take third over his teammate Michael Thomas (47.70). Nitro’s Mason Tenney also got under 48 seconds, going 47.97.

King’s Mathias Oh (48.07) and College Area’s Micah Ornelas (48.70) rounded out the championship heat.

The B final was a great race between Javier Barrenas of the Bolles School and Matthew Grauslys of Executive. Barrenas put up a 48.20 to beat the 48.23 from Grauslys for 9th place.

 

You can find our full day 3 recap here.

You can view race videos from all A finals on day 3 here.

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PVK

My bet is that he goes under 46 within the year

PVK

^in 2015

Chris

Peter VanderKay?

About Jared Anderson

Jared Anderson

Jared Anderson swam for nearly twenty years. Then, Jared Anderson stopped swimming and started writing about swimming. He's not sick of swimming yet. Swimming might be sick of him, though. Jared was a YMCA and high school swimmer in northern Minnesota, and spent his college years swimming breaststroke and occasionally pretending …

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