Race Video: Michael Andrew 50 Yard Freestyle 13-14 NAG Record, 19.85

Michael Andrew 50 Yard Freestyle NAG Record – Reported by Braden Keith

Michael Andrew swam a 19.85 in the 50 yard free on Saturday night at the Jenks Sectional in Oklahoma, breaking the National Age Group Record that seems to, ironically, have been the hardest for him to get at the 13-14 level (among his wheelhouse events, at least).

That broke the 20.02 that Arizonan Ryan Hoffer swam in 2013 and makes Andrew the youngest swimmer ever under 20 seconds in the event. Hoffer now holds the National Age Group Record for 15-16′s already at a 19.54, but Andrew’s not far off of that time either.

See the complete report on Michael Andrew’s record here.

You can follow Michael Andrew on Twitter here, @SwimmerMichael. 

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TJ
7 years ago
Ben
7 years ago

exactly. Its like I know this was done with an iphone 5…. I know what kind of quality that phone can produce

bobo gigi
7 years ago

Thank you for the video.
We can hear a very happy girl. MA’s sister? MA’s mother?
The dinosaurs are also back at the 39th second of the video for the slow motion. 🙂

Peterdavis
Reply to  bobo gigi
7 years ago

Hi Bobo. I thought we agreed it wasn’t dinosaurs, but God. Space-time. Unfolding. To watch Michael. No? Although, if you insist, I will begin picturing dinosaurs, starting with my favorite: Petrie the pteranodon. 🙂

Swimmer24
7 years ago

This is a phenomenal swim, but I have one question. Why does he have such poor streamline?!? It’s one of the most important fundamentals of swimming. You can see it off the start and turn, when the kid below him gets a much better start and turn. As I have read that you are only supposed to use USRPT if you are technically sound, how would the Andrews let something like this go. As a coach streamlining is one of the things I stress the most from an early age. When you are underwater of the start is the time when you should be the fastest, not hindered by bad streamline.

Fluidg
Reply to  Swimmer24
7 years ago

You’re kidding, right?

ken baker
Reply to  Swimmer24
7 years ago

While you choose to emphasize on the underwaters with your younger swimmers – what REALLY needs to be emphasized is swimming the specific stroke with the best technique for THAT swimmer.

Each swimmer is different and all of them have different strokes that help them move through the water – and while underwaters are important – these are things the Andrews family can work on in the future to help his times even further – but aren’t necessary as long as his technique and strength continues to improve.

I find it interesting that USA Swimming doesn’t even recognize the concept of Brent Rushall – and I’m not so sure they are scared of what Michael is doing in the… Read more »

Fluidg
Reply to  ken baker
7 years ago

Right on. We’re seeing the birth of a Revolution. Instead of cheers, it’s being met with scowls and negativity. The traditional sport is addicted to mileage and terrified of rest. I’ve stayed in it long enough to try just about every approach and discovered firsthand just how critical recovery is. And I’ve benefitted from trickle down from Dave Salo’s wisdom. When I told my coaches I need 4 to 5 weeks to hit my peak (and that’s off of low yardage) they looked at me like I had two heads! Then they made comments about how out of shape I would get after a week of rest. They just watch and shake their heads.

Mega-yardage is the safe path preferred… Read more »

Husker
Reply to  ken baker
7 years ago

Ken, USRPT is not the problem whether a kid can make a time cut or not, the technique is in most cases.

Lane Four
Reply to  Swimmer24
7 years ago

Technique is something unique. Although most people use Janet Evans as their prime example of “poor technique” (not my words but others), the best example would be Shirley Babashoff. Her strokes were extremely short but she definitely got the job done under the water. I asked her coach (before going to Mission Viejo) from the Huntington Beach Aquatic Club, Flip Darr, why he didn’t stretch her arms out. He told me that he was not going to mess with what came naturally to her. The same can be said with Michael. Maybe a tweak here and there as he gets older, but otherwise leave his stroke and technique alone. It is his and his alone.

Baltimoron
Reply to  Lane Four
7 years ago

Great comment! Technique is critical, yet elusive–it isn’t a one-size-fits-all approach. I feel this is most clearly illustrated in distance freestyle events. Has anyone seen the old videos of Vladimir Salnikov swimming? I think it all depends on working within a range that comes naturally to a swimmer while maintaining efficiency and reducing drag… As far as USRPT goes, I am excited to see what the future holds.

Peterdavis
Reply to  Baltimoron
7 years ago

What a great string of comments. This is why I love love love this kid. Not that we want to put our world on his shoulders, but look what he is creating: debate, critical thought, excitement! I’m back in the pool swimming 500+- yards of USRPT and resistance work(feels good 🙂 ) per day, working towards 1k+, despite injury making even a push-up near impossible. Thank you Michael

Admin
Reply to  Peterdavis
7 years ago

So there’s a great idea about USRPT and Masters Swimming. Obviously, there’s the David Guthries of the world, who are training for performance, but there’s a huge chunk of Masters swimmers who are training for fitness and fun, and the improvement is a byproduct of that that they enjoy thoroughly.

Based on where the “fitness industry” is going, USRPT should create much more “high intensity interval training” than higher-yardage training – burn more calories, maintain more muscle that is so important to maintain as we age just for the sake of health.

Peterdavis
Reply to  Peterdavis
7 years ago

Right. On.

I see Masters groups training more yardage than the elite age-groupers and college guys(save the distance groups). A close friend of mine was training 100k per week in his 40s! He achieved about 3-4 WRs in each age-group from 40-60, but I was always astounded at that approach. 5am…lunch swim…and throw in a few night swims per week. Yowza!

I think there is a balance. Once you have lifted and trained as a sprinter, mid-distance workouts are long and boring, but real easy on the body, and feel great physically(but are mentally and emotionally frustrating – to me, at least). I liken it to a long bike ride. That’s feel good exercise. But I can’t find the time… Read more »

Alex
Reply to  Swimmer24
7 years ago

@Swimmer24
What is your time and how old are you?
Looking forward to seeing your answer

bobo gigi
7 years ago

USA swimming has recently talked about USRPT on its website.
http://www.usaswimming.org/ViewNewsArticle.aspx?TabId=0&itemid=5857&mid=8712

USRPT FAN
Reply to  bobo gigi
7 years ago

It appeared USA Swimming dismissed USRPT instead of addressing it as the article was titled. You can find Dr. Rushall’s response to Dan McCarthy’s article here.

http://coachsci.sdsu.edu/swim/bullets/48Reply.pdf

USA Swimming frequently expresses that they welcome new ideas and training methods but it appears to be just lip service at this time.

USRPT has the potential to grow the sport we love in ways we could not even imagine and our governing body owes it to its members to give it the time and place it deserves.

DRUKSTOP
7 years ago

Annnnnnd he brakes the 200 back record… 1:45.1

WHOKNOWS
7 years ago

Dressel’s time as a 16 year old was a 19.82…

When are we going to hear from Andrew’s sponsors???

About Gold Medal Mel Stewart

Gold Medal Mel Stewart

MEL STEWART Jr., aka Gold Medal Mel, won three Olympic medals at the 1992 Olympic Games. Mel's best event was the 200 butterfly. He is a former World, American, and NCAA Record holder in the 200 butterfly. As a writer/producer and sports columnist, Mel has contributed to Yahoo Sports, Universal Sports, …

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