Americans Break Junior World Record in Girls’ 400 Free Relay With Silver Medal Swim

  11 Braden Keith | August 29th, 2014 | Featured, National, News

pinit fg en rect gray 28 Americans Break Junior World Record in Girls 400 Free Relay With Silver Medal Swim

The American girls’ 400 free relay on Friday at the 2014 Junior Pan Pac Championships may not have won gold, but they did get the Junior World Record.

The grouping of Stanzi MoseleyAmy BilquistKatie Drabot, and Katrina Konopka combined for a 3:40.14 for Team USA, which was faster than the 3:41.40 done by the Russians at last year’s Junior World Championships which is the benchmark for FINA to recognize records.

Australia is the second junior team to go under the old record, but do not officially hold it because at least one swimmer is too old. That brings up one of the challenges of how FINA has defined “junior” for these records – namely that swimmers can be on a junior team and at a junior meet, but not break a junior record. That’s especially tough in relay situations, where teams will have to choose between gold medals and Junior World Records, perhaps.

There are differing age rules for this meet as from FINA’s criteria for Junior World Records. Jr. Pan Pacs rules state that athletes must be 18 or under as of the first day of racing in Maui, whereas FINA defines juniors, on the women’s side, as being 17 or younger as of December 31st of the current year. Sophie Taylor was born in 1996, and therefore the Australians are not eligible for the World Junior Record.

Australia won in 3:39.73, and at the Youth Olympic Games, China won in 3:41.19, also under the old record, but also with one swimmer born in 1996.

The Americans’ record-setting splits:

  1. Moseley (1998) – 55.66
  2. Bilquist (1997) – 55.00
  3. Drabot (1997) – 54.46
  4. Konopka (1997) – 55.02

Australia’s winning time did break the USA’s Meet Record in the event, and included a 54.33 anchor split from Chelsea Gillett.

Comments

  1. aswimfan says:
    6
    0

    I think the FINA system is so stupid. They need to separate the basis for Junior World Record from the requirement to attend Junior World Championships. With the current system, swimmers whose DOB is at the end of the year are given the most advantage because they can participate in all major meets to try to break world records.

    The actual birth of date need to be the requirement where a swimmer can break junior world record.

  2. Redbirdfan says:
    3
    0

    Great swim ladies, another good chance for a Jr. WR in the medley tomorrow!

    • Rafael says:
      0
      1

      To be eligible the team would have to be Bilquist, Lilly, Mozelei, and Hann/Bayer.

      The record is 3:41:40 by Russia.. the splits (Russia vs US doing at Pan Pacs would be something around this)

      Bilquist and Daria are both 1:01..
      Lilly is 1:07 high and Anna are 1:08 high, 1 second advantage to US
      Mozeley and Rozaliya are even too
      Hann/Bayer and 1 second slower than Chimrova.. it will be close but I think US can do it

  3. worldview says:
    1
    25

    I am confused. This propaganda article is similar to a 1980’s overly zealous nationalist former eastern block government, but instead on this occasion the word ‘American’ replaces ‘CCCP’ or ‘DDR’.

    Perhaps you should amend your headline to be more reflective of the true facts….the Australians broke the world record by touching first, therefore they were holders of the new record and the teams that touched subsequently to them did NOT break the new junior world record set moments before them.

    And the statement ‘…they did get the Junior World Record…’ is terribly misleading…especially for a youth event.

    For everyone outside of the USA we know that this website is for US citizens and it does give a great insight into the ‘fishbowl’, but really??

    • Braden Keith Braden Keith says:
      16
      0

      worldview – I’m not sure why you’re so angry, but no, the Australians did not break the Junior World Record, as is explained pretty clearly within the article. Read again, and hopefully these unfortunate flashbacks you’re having will stop.

    • anonymous says:
      6
      0

      Did you read the article? If so, did you understand all of the words?

  4. John says:
    8
    0

    The headline is accurate. You’re confusion is more with the definition of ages and “junior” as per FINA definitions. You’re problem is more with FINA and less with this website.

    You made a very unfair statement about this site being America-centric. Look at the LEN championship coverage. Swimswam I making huge strides in providing global coverage.

    Check your facts before you act my friend.

  5. Purdue Pete says:
    0
    0

    Speaking of a world perspective, has anyone had a Bobogigi sighting?

    • Braden Keith Braden Keith says:
      2
      0

      Purdue Pete – he reemerged last night. Said it was technical problems. He’s working on processing the last week of info and then I’m sure he’ll unleash upon SwimSwam.

    • Ferb says:
      0
      0

      More importantly, where has Chinesesupreme been? That guy is a riot.

  6. Jim C says:
    0
    0

    The Junior WRs are defined in a way so as not to be obtrusive. Imagine an American swimmer who could set a Jr WR at the Olympic Trials but not the Olympics themselves. The Americans would not want the FINA giving such a swimmer an incentive to focus on the Trials rather than the Olympics. The FINA definition guarantees that there will not be a change in status between Trials and Olympics or Trials and another international meet–as long as both are held in the same year.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Connect with Facebook

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

About Braden Keith

The most common question asked about Braden Keith is "when does he sleep?" That's because Braden has, in two years in the game, become one of the most prolific writers in swimming at a level that has earned him the nickname "the machine" in some circles. He first got his feet …

Read More »