Adam Peaty’s 56-Point – “It’s Not IF, but WHEN”

The idea of someone capturing a 56-point 100 LCM breaststroke is virtually a mind-combusting thought but, then again, we live in the time of British breaststroking legend Adam Peaty.

“It’s not a question of if I’ll do it, but when I’ll do it,” says the 23-year-old Loughborough-based athlete who continues to crush barriers and approach an almost 4-year streak of being undefeated in his signature 100m breaststroke event.

Calling the 2014 Commonwealth Games in Glasgow his entry into the door of his senior career, Peaty has been unstoppable since, culminating in a history-making time of 57.13 to crush the men’s field in Rio and clinch his first Olympic gold medal. He has since continued his tear, ripping another sub-58 in 57.79 at the British Championships in 2017, followed by World Championships gold in 57.47 while competing in Budapest.

Even under heavy training, as was the case at the Edinburgh International meet, which doubled as this year’s British Champiosnips, Peaty can produce big-time results. He won the 100m breast event in a swift 58.78 unrested, a mark that currently stands as number one in the world.

Now the breaststroking beast turns to the Commonwealth Games that kick-off next month in Australia. He and coach Mel Marshall are preparing mentally and physically for potentially even more history to be made.

“I’ll drop from about 94kg in the winter to about 88kg when I’m racing, which is a huge drop but is something we do very carefully over 10 weeks; if I just stopped eating I’d lose all my muscle. Training with all that bulk during the winter means that when I come to stripping it’s like going from a dumper truck to an F1 car.

“It’s all about fine tuning – like a race car you look at the engine and the computer and you fine tune it to get those extra performance benefits, and that’s what we try to do,” Peaty says of his pre-race planning.

For Marshall, she says the pair adhere to the mentality that, “If you do what you’ve always done, you’ll get what you’ve always gotten,” referring to new ways to approach both training and recovery strategies in order to continue evolving.

Goals-wise for the Gold Coast, Peaty says, “Winning the triple would be awesome. The 50m and the 100m breaststroke are my events and I’ll focus on those first and then we’ll see what happens in the relay.”

Grounded in reality, Peaty also states, “That isn’t enough when you’re the world record holder though, as people are always watching the clock to see if you can go even quicker.

“56 is definitely doable and it’s not a question of if I’ll do it but when I’ll do it. I’ve got to go out in 26.4, which 0.2 under what I’d usually go out in, and then I’d have to come back in the same as Rio. If I can get my body weight right, and I’m currently on track if not ahead, and I can get it right in the pool, then who knows.”

Video and quotes courtesy of Loughborough University.

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Swisher

Peaty is the asymptote.

Swisher

Seriously though, there is a theoretical limit to how fast a human can complete a race given the rules of the stroke. Peaty is so specialized in his training for the 100 breast, he has so much science and tech behind him to make him the best that he can be, he has such an impressive mindset, and he is so far ahead of everyone else in this race, that I think he may get very close to that theoretical limit. Phelp’s goal was to do something no one had ever done in the sport. And he did it, and it was amazing. He is the most dominant and well-rounded swimmer in history, and I don’t know if we’ll ever… Read more »

Steve Nolan

You guys, his pullouts are so bad. He’s not near peak.

Dunno if it’s gonna be him or someone else that gets there, but feel like a lot rides on that.

Dee

Peaty has said before; He has numerous goals, but at the end his career he wants a time that will stand for a very, very long time. I believe that’s his motivation, to take the 100 breastroke to places we may not see again for a very long time.

Caeleb is Phelps on steriods

If he got his pullouts to be just even with the rest of the field then his record might last for 10 years. If he got a pullouts like Caeleb Dressel…his time would be a 56 low/55 high and would be dam near peak human performance.

Caeleb Dressel Will Win 8 Gold Medals in Tokyo

“Records are made to be broken”

Tea rex

Very insightful! Two takeaways: 1. “an almost 4-year streak of being undefeated in his signature 100m breaststroke event.” I love this stat. When I came up, Aaron Peirsol was the man because he didn’t lose a backstroke race for I think at least a half decade. 2. “I’ll drop from about 94kg in the winter to about 88kg when I’m racing, which is a huge drop but is something we do very carefully over 10 weeks; if I just stopped eating I’d lose all my muscle. Training with all that bulk during the winter means that when I come to stripping it’s like going from a dumper truck to an F1 car.” Most people shave, some people train with tights… Read more »

Pvdh

Phelps didn’t lose 200 fly from 2001 to 2011

Tea rex

Yeah, that shows how elite that club is.

Caeleb Dressel Will Get 8 golds in Tokyo

He did lose it in 2002 when he flopped it at Pan Pacs

Bon Jovi

shhhhhh

ERVINFORTHEWIN

lol

DMacNCheez

He actually lost to Malchow at Pan Pacs in ’02, but 03-11 is still nuts

straightblackline

I’m no stats guru but from memory Grant Hackett went undefeated in the 1500 from about 1997 to 2007. Could that be the longest winning streak?

Sqimgod

1997-2005 for hackett. He was injured in 2006

LEZAK WITH A HUGE LUNGE

He straight up bulks and cuts like a bodybuilder lmao.

Caeleb Dressel Will Get 8 golds in Tokyo

See, I like that attitude. Not even Phelps showed that in public before. Not if, but WHEN.

About Loretta Race

Loretta Race

After 16 years at a Fortune 1000 financial company, long-time swimmer Retta Race decided to change lanes and pursue her sporting passion. She currently is Coach for the Northern KY Swordfish Masters, a team she started up in December 2013, while also offering private coaching. Retta is also an MBA …

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