McLaughlin & Baker: “The difference is how much fun we had as a team”

Reported by Lauren Neidigh.

WOMEN’S 200 BACK

  • NCAA record: Elizabeth Pelton (2013)- 1:47.84
  • American record: Elizabeth Pelton (2013)- 1:47.84
  • U.S. Open record: Elizabeth Pelton (2013)- 1:47.84
  • Championship Record: Elizabeth Pelton (2013)- 1:47.84
  • 2016 NCAA Champion: Danielle Galyer, Kentucky, 1:49.71
  1. Kathleen Baker (Cal)- 1:48.44
  2. Alexia Zevnik (NC State)- 1:49.09
  3. Asia Seidt (Kentucky)- 1:49.63

Cal’s Kathleen Baker and NC State’s Alexia Zevnik battled down the stretch, but Baker broke away with a big underwater on the final wall to win the race in 1:48.44. Kentucky freshman Asia Seidt had a huge swim to take 3rd in 1:49.63, while teammate and 2016 champion Danielle Galyer (1:50.49) took 5th and fellow Kentucky freshman Ali Galyer (1:51.05) took 8th.

Texas’ Tasija Karosas finished just outside of the top 3, cranking out a personal best 1:49.91 to take 4th and break 1:50 for the first time in her career. Missouri’s Nadine Laemmler also came up with a big personal best, clocking in at 1:50.79 to win the B final.

WOMEN’S 200 FLY

  • NCAA record: Elaine Breeden (2009), 1:49.92
  • American record: Elaine Breeden (2009), 1:49.92
  • U.S. Open record: Elaine Breeden (2009), 1:49.92
  • Championship Record: Kelsi Worrell, Louisville, 1:50.61
  • 2016 NCAA Champion: Kelsi Worrell, Louisville, 1:50.96
  1. Ella Eastin (Stanford)- 1:51.35
  2. Katie McLaughlin (Cal)- 1:52.37
  3. Jenn Marrkand (Virginia)- 1:53.15

Stanford’s Ella Eastin put up a convincing win in the 200 fly, winning her 2nd NCAA title of the meet. Cal’s Katie McLaughlin knocked a second off her best time to place 2nd in 1:52.37. Texas’ Remedy Rule initially touched 3rd in 1:52.92, but was disqualified for a 15-meter violation, bumping Virginia’s Jenn Marrkand up into the top 3.

 

AB

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About Coleman Hodges

Coleman Hodges

Coleman started his journey in the water at age 1, and although he actually has no memory of that, something must have stuck. A Missouri native, he joined the Columbia Swim Club at age 9, where he is still remembered for his stylish dragon swim trunks. After giving up on …

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