What Will It Take To Qualify For The 2024 NCAA Division I Championships?

The NCAA recently published the Division I swimming & diving qualifying standards for the 2024 championships, with the ‘A’ cut in 16 different individual events getting faster from last season.

The University of Virginia women and Cal Berkeley men enter the 2023-24 campaign as the reigning national champions, with the Cavaliers winning their third straight title and the Golden Bears claiming their second consecutive crown this past March. The 2024 women’s championships will run March 20-23 in Athens, Georgia, while the men’s competition will be held in Indianapolis, Indiana, from March 27-30.

The NCAA allows 235 swimming spots for men and 281 swimming spots for women for individual events at the NCAA Division 1 Swimming & Diving Championships. These numbers don’t include relay-only swimmers.

Each team is also limited to bringing 18 athletes, with divers counting as half. If a team qualifies more than 18 athletes, a situation which happened this past season with the NC State men, they must cut athletes to get down to a total of 18.

Swimmers automatically qualify if they achieve one of the ‘A’ cuts seen below. The ‘B’ cuts are used for consideration and one swimmer is added to each event until the swimming athlete cap of 235 for men and 281 for women is filled.

See the new qualifying standards below:

2024 Division I Swimming & Diving Qualifying Standards

Men’s B Standard Men’s ‘A’ Standard Event Women’s ‘A’ Standard Women’s ‘B’ Standard
19.79 18.82 50 free 21.63 22.67
43.46 41.50 100 free 47.18 49.36
1:35.79 1:31.74 200 free 1:42.84 1:47.12
4:21.99 4:10.74 500 free 4:37.89 4:47.20
15:25.12 14:37.31 1650 free 15:52.41 16:30.59
47.08 44.64 100 fly 50.69 53.63
1:45.89 1:40.16 200 fly 1:52.86 1:59.23
47.47 44.71 100 back 50.88 53.82
1:44.60 1:39.13 200 back 1:50.50 1:57.07
53.63 51.10 100 breast 58.02 1:01.46
1:57.44 1:51.09 200 breast 2:05.73 2:13.86
1:46.16 1:41.03 200 IM 1:53.66 1:59.56
3:50.68 3:38.90 400 IM 4:03.62 4:17.30
1:17.38 1:16.80 200 free relay 1:28.43 1:29.21
2:51.86 2:50.44 400 free relay 3:14.10 3:16.25
6:18.94 6:16.02 800 free relay 7:00.86 7:05.88
1:24.32 1:23.71 200 medley relay 1:36.24 1:37.00
3:06.84 3:04.96 400 medley relay 3:31.38 3:33.48

Diving

Men’s Zones Event Women’s Zones
300* 1-Meter 265* / 220**
320* 3-Meter 280* / 235**
300* Platform 225**

*Qualifying point total in any 6 dive list
**Qualifying point in any 5 dive list

Last season, the women’s cutline fell around row 39 for the second straight time, while the last men’s qualifier came six swimmers into row 30 (for a full explanation on what that means exactly click here).

See the exact time it took to receive an invite for the past four seasons below:

WOMEN’S CUTS

EVENT (SCY) 2020 INVITE TIME 2021 INVITE TIME 2022 INVITE TIME 2023 INVITE TIME
50 free 22.21 22.32 22.16 22.15
100 free 48.51 48.76 48.44 48.37
200 free 1:45.23 1:46.25 1:45.42 1:45.31
500 free 4:41.20 4:44.77 4:43.08 4:41.09
1650 free 16:17.45 16:25.47 16:16.47 16:13.73
100 fly 52.34 52.70 52.35 52.20
200 fly 1:56.06 1:57.42 1:56.14 1:55.92
100 back 52.73 53.01 52.46 52.36
200 back 1:53.99 1:55.05 1:53.97 1:53.94
100 breast 59.98 1:00.12 59.87 59.73
200 breast 2:10.12 2:10.37 2:09.15 2:09.68
200 IM 1:57.31 1:57.62 1:56.85 1:56.90
400 IM 4:10.39 4:13.19 4:11.60 4:11.36

MEN’S CUTS

EVENT (SCY) 2020 INVITE TIME 2021 INVITE TIME 2022 INVITE TIME 2023 INVITE TIME
50 free 19.32 19.46 19.28 19.21
100 free 42.57 42.88 42.34 42.32
200 free 1:34.07 1:34.04 1:33.08 1:32.85
500 free 4:16.49 4:16.75 4:14.96 4:14.36
1650 free 14:57.07 15:01.33 14:55.21 14:53.84
100 fly 45.97 46.29 45.57 45.57
200 fly 1:43.18 1:43.47 1:42.42 1:42.57
100 back 46.22 46.37 45.87 45.70
200 back 1:41.49 1:41.81 1:40.92 1:40.62
100 breast 52.46 52.40 52.20 51.90
200 breast 1:54.03 1:54.28 1:53.23 1:52.94
200 IM 1:43.79 1:44.15 1:43.36 1:43.14
400 IM 3:44.36 3:45.67 3:43.50 3:42.99

As you can see above, the vast majority of the events had a faster cutline time last season compared to 2021-22, with the men’s 200 fly, women’s 200 breast and women’s 200 IM the only three to get slower, while the men’s 100 fly remained the same.

With so many ‘A’ cuts getting quicker this year, along with the majority of the ‘B’ standards, we’re seemingly destined to see the invite times in 2024 continue the trend of getting faster as the world of college swimming continues to level up.

The eventual NCAA champions from UVA had the most women’s qualifiers last season with 17, while the top men’s program was NC State with 19. See the full top 10 list below:

Women’s NCAA Qualifiers – Top 10 Schools

Rank School Qualifiers
1 Virginia, University of 17
2 Florida, University of 16
T-3 Stanford University 15
T-3 Ohio State University 15
5 Texas, University of 14
T-6 Kentucky, University of 13
T-6 North Carolina State University 13
8 Louisville, University of 11
9 University of Tennessee 10
T-10 Georgia, University of 9
T-10 California, University of, Berkeley 9

Men’s NCAA Qualifiers – Top 10 Schools

Rank School Qualifiers
1 North Carolina State University 19
T-2 Florida, University of 16
T-2 California, University of, Berkeley 16
T-4 Arizona State University 15
T-4 Texas, University of 15
6 Stanford University 12
T-7 Auburn University 10
T-7 University of Tennessee 10
9 Indiana University 9
T-10 VA Tech 8
T-10 Georgia, University of 8

Also Read: Which Cuts Got Faster? Comparing The 2024 NCAA Championship Standards To Last Season

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SwimFan1000
9 months ago

Is it possible this years invite times are a bit slower due to red shirts? For e.g., we already know Claire Curzan and Tori Huske are not swimming. Doesn’t that presumable move the cut down 1 person for their events?

About James Sutherland

James Sutherland

James swam five years at Laurentian University in Sudbury, Ontario, specializing in the 200 free, back and IM. He finished up his collegiate swimming career in 2018, graduating with a bachelor's degree in economics. In 2019 he completed his graduate degree in sports journalism. Prior to going to Laurentian, James swam …

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