International Swimming League Finale in Las Vegas: Day Two Live Recap

2019 International Swimming League Finale

  • Friday, December 20 – Saturday, December 21, 2019
  • 1:00 – 3:00 PM Local Time (U.S. Pacific Time)
  • Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino – Las Vegas, NV
  • Short Course Meters (SCM) format
  • Top 4 qualifying franchises: Energy Standard, London Roar, LA Current, Cali Condors
  • Live Stream (ESPN3)
  • Day 1 complete results
  • Day 2 complete results

View Day 2 Entry Lists Here

Lane Assignments:

  • LA Current – Lanes 1/2
  • London Roar – Lanes 3/4
  • Energy Standard – Lanes 5/6
  • Cali Condors – Lanes 7/8

Team Scores After Day 1

  1. Energy Standard – 219
  2. Cali Condors – 205.5
  3. London Roar – 202
  4. LA Current – 185.5

Top-5 MVP Points After Day 1

  1. Caeleb Dressel CAC – 52.0
  2. Nic Fink CAC – 41.0
  3. Sarah Sjostrom ENS – 37.0
  4. Lilly King CAC – 36.0
  5. Florent Manaudou ENS / Olivia Smoliga CAC – 32.0 (tie)

SwimSwam’s Jared Anderson provides live color commentary on each race in italics, below:

Today is the final day of the inaugural season of the International Swim League, and it is a potential three-team race for the coveted trophy. Currently, Energy Standard has a slight lead over the Cali Condors, who won 9 events yesterday, and the London Roar.

Women’s 100 Free

1.    Emma McKeon – LON – 51.38
2.    Sarah Sjostrom – ENS– 51.50
3.    Cate Campbell – LON– 51.68
4.    Kayla Sanchez – ENS – 51.71
5.    Natalie Hinds – CAC – 52.01
6.    Mallory Commerford – CAC – 52.26
7.    Beryl Gastaldello – LAC – 52.38
8.    Amy Bilquist – LAC – 53.75

Emma McKeon and Cate Campbell roared out of the blocks for the 100 free, however, did see a last-minute surge by Sarah Sjostrom of Energy Standard. Yet it was McKeon who toppled Sjostrom in the final meters.

We knew London would need to show up big today, and they sure did in this event. A 1-3 finish fingers them 15 individual points. The downside is that Energy Standard also goes 2-4, so they’ll score 12 and keep the margin close. This event really shows the disparity between the European franchises and their American counterparts, who will score only a pittance by comparison.

Men’s 100 Free

  • World Record: 44.94, Amaury Leveaux (FRA), 2008
  • U.S. Open Record: 45.69, Caeleb Dressel (USA), 2019

1.    Caeleb Dressel – CAC – 45.22 *U.S. Open record
2.    Kyle Chalmers – LON – 45.55
3.    Duncan Scott – LON – 46.09
4.    Sergey Shevtsov – ENS – 46.41
5.    Nathan Adrian – LAC – 46.62
6.    Michael Chadwick – LAC – 46.71
7.    Chad le Clos – ENS – 46.95
8.    Bowe Becker – CAC – 47.39

Condor Caeleb Dressel was out like a rocket, turning under world record pace at the 50-meter mark. At the finish, Dressel did break the U.S. Open/American record, however, right behind him was a 2-3 finish by London Roar members Kyle Chalmers and Duncan Scott.

Another great showing for London, which goes 2-3. Dressel has been unstoppable and nearly broke the world record. But Chalmers and Scott are keeping London well in the hunt here, and if they’re swimming well, it’s a good sign for the skins later on. Despite Dressel’s outstanding swim, Cali continues to struggle with depth, taking first and eighth. Energy Standard also can’t quite keep up with London’s early pace, taking just 4th and 8th.

Women’s 100 Breast

  • World Record: 1:02.36, Alia Atkinson (JAM), 2014, 2016 / Ruta Meilutyte (LTU), 2013
  • U.S. Open Record: 1:03.00, Lilly King (USA), 2019

1.    Lilly King – CAC – 1:03.71
2.    Annie Lazor – LAC – 1:04.07
3.    Molly Hannis – CAC – 1:04.74
4.    Sydney Pickrem – LON – 1:04.83
5.    Jess Hansen – LON – 1:05.27
6.    Jhennifer Conceicao – LAC – 1:05.73
7.    Jocelyn Ulyett – ENS – 1:05.78
8.    Kierra Smith – ENS – 1:06.82

Again, it was the early lead that benefitted Lilly King of the Cali Condors, who is now 12-for-12 in her debut ISL season. Annie Lazor of the LA Current out of lane 2 did give King the slight edge, but was only able to manage preventing Condor Molly Hannis from snagging 2nd place.

Make it a perfect 12-for-12 on the season for Lilly King, who has won every single breaststroke event this season. That considered, a 1-3 is actually a relatively poor finish for Cali, which has been 1-2 in the women’s breaststrokes most of the season. LA’s Lazor snuck in for silver as the American teams really dominated. London going 4-5 is on the better end of what was expected, and Energy Standard continues to hurt for points with a 7-8 here in one of their weakest stroke disciplines.

Men’s 100 Breast

  • World Record: 55.61, Cameron van der Burgh (RSA), 2009
  • U.S. Open Record: 56.29, Ian Finnerty (USA), 2019

1.    Adam Peaty – LON – 55.92 *U.S. Open record
2.    Ilya Shymanovich – ENS – 56.55
3.    Nic Fink – CAC – 56.71
4.    Kirill Prigoda – LON – 56.74
5.    Felipe Lima – LAC – 56.83
6.    Will Licon – LAC – 57.19
7.    Anton Chuokov – ENS – 57.53
8.    Andrew Wilson – CAC – 58.01

Adam Peaty controlled the race from start to finish, carrying momentum for the Roar with a lifetime best/British record/U.S. Open record. Nic Fink out of lane 8 looked stellar in the opening 50, yet did get touched out by Energy Standard’s Ilya Shymanovich for second place.

Despite the 50 breast upset yesterday, it was all Adam Peaty here in the 100. The London captain came up big, giving London its second win of the day, matching Cali. The second Roar entrant was fourth, which is a big swing compared to 2nd/7th Energy Standard. LA hurts the worst here in 5th and 6th.

Updated Team Scores

  1. London Roar – 253
  2. Energy Standard – 250
  3. Cali Condors – 244.5
  4. LA Current – 212.5

Women’s 400 Free

  • World Record: 3:53.92, Ariarne Titmus (AUS), 2018
  • U.S. Open Record: 3:54.06, Katie Ledecky (USA), 2019

1.    Ariarne Titmus – CAC – 3:56.21
2.    Holly Hibbot – LON – 3:57.45
3.    Leah Smith – LAC – 3:59.75
4.    Hali Flickinger – CAC – 4:02.14
5.    Mireia Belmonte – LON – 4:02.18
6.    Charlotte Bonnet – ENS – 4:02.18
7.    Fantine Lesaffre – ENS – 4:06.73
8.    Ella Eastin – LAC – 4:09.44

Aussie world champion Ariarne Titmus soared through the first 200 under world record pace for the Condors, and was able to hold on to snag the win. Meanwhile, Roar’s Holly Hibbott pushed the last 75 meters and attempted to catch Titmus, yet did manage 2nd place.

Behind LA’s Leah Smith, who finished third, Condor Hali Flickinger took down Roar’s Mireia Belmonte for a crucial 4th-place finish.

Yet another Cali win as the Condors top-end continues to carry the team. A 1-4 here is a very solid finish for both entrants. Yet again, we’re seeing Energy Standard drop off – they were just 6th and 7th, though this wasn’t expected to be a great event for them. London was pretty decent, but LA had trouble filling out their lineup and took 8th with IMer Eastin.

Men’s 400 Free

  • World Record: 3:32.25, Yannick Agnel (FRA), 2012
  • U.S. Open Record: 3:37.78, James Guy (GBR), 2015

1.    James Guy – LON – 3:39.99
2.    Eliah Winnington – LON – 3:40.43
3.    Max Litchfield – ENS / Townley Haas – CAC – 3:40.86                                                                                4.    (tie)
5.    Anton Ipsen – CAC – 3:41.21
6.    Kregor Zirk – ENS – 3:42.12
7.    Andrew Seliskar – LAC – 3:42.19
8.    Blake Pieroni – LAC – 3:48.74

It was a tight race from start to finish, with both London Roar and Energy Standard members leading into the final 50 meters. Carrying the momentum for London’s men’s middle distance squad was James Guy and Elijah Winnington finishing 1-2. Behind them was a tie for third place between Energy’s Max Litchfield and Condor Townley Haas.

With neither derby winner in attendance (Iron’s Christiansen and DC’s Grothe), things opened up for London to take an emphatic 1-2 and surge into the points lead. Energy Standard could only counter with a 3-6, with that third a tie. London has clearly showed up to compete today, and it’s going to be tough sledding for anyone to catch them now that they’re out to a solid lead. LA, meanwhile, has dropped off the map, taking 7th and 8th here, with Pieroni very nearly missing the benchmark time.

Women’s 400 Medley Relay

1.    Cali Condors 2 – 3:46.82
2.    London Roar 1 – 3:47.27
3.    London Roar 2 – 3:49.23
4.    Energy Standard 1 – 3:49.68
5.    Cali Condors 1 – 3:50.72
6.    LA Current 1 – 3:50.75
7.    Energy Standard 2 – 3:51.29
8.    LA Current 2 – 3:54.44

The Cali Condors had a stacked relay that dominated the event from start to finish, with stroke champions Olivia Smoliga, Lilly King, and Kelsi Dahlia giving Mallory Comerford a well-needed lead to hold off Cate Campbell and the London Roar. Behind Campbell and the second-place Roar relay was the same team’s B-relay.

Another Cali Condors win – they’ve been excellent in the women’s medley this entire season. London, though, put together a 2-3 finish on their stellar depth – that’s a massive points boost of 26 for the Roar, matching Cali’s points exactly. The LA Current struggled again here, taking 6th and 8th, and Energy Standard’s 4-7 finish won’t help them reel in London

Team Scores After Session 4:

  1. London Roar – 306
  2. Cali Condors – 294
  3. Energy Standard – 277.5
  4. LA Current – 230.5

Men’s 200 IM

  • World Record: 1:49.63, Ryan Lochte (USA), 2012
  • U.S. Open Record: 1:52.93, Mitch Larkin (AUS), 2019

1.    Daiya Seto – ENS – 1:50.76 *U.S. Open record
2.    Duncan Scott – LON – 1:51.85
3.    Josh Prenot – LAC – 1:53.75
4.    Mitch Larkin – CAC – 1:53.83
5.    Chase Kalisz – LAC – 1:54.44
6.    Finlay Knox – LON – 1:55.12
7.    Mark Szaranek – CAC – 1:55.44
8.    Maxim Stupin – ENS – 1:56.52

After his stunning 400 IM world record, Energy’s Daiya Seto continued his momentum to bring his team up from third with a successful IM sweep in a new U.S. Open record. London Roar’s Duncan Scott zipped past LA’s Josh Prenot and Condor Mitch Larkin for second place in a new British record. Meanwhile, Prenot touched-out Larkin to close out the top 3 finishers.

Daiya Seto has been the key impact addition of the finale, and he gets a big 200 IM win here in a U.S. Open record. That’s a big point boost for Energy Standard, though an 8th place finish kind of dulls those points. Each team had one swimmer in the top four and one in the bottom four, as points were spread pretty evenly here. Duncan Scott‘s versatility has been big for London, as he’s second here carrying another IM event for the Roar.

Women’s 200 IM

  • World Record: 2:01.86, Katinka Hosszu (HUN), 2014
  • U.S. Open Record: 2:03.66, Katinka Hosszu (HUN), 2015

1.    Sydney Pickrem – LON – 2:04.85
2.    Melanie Margalis – CAC – 2:05.32
3.    Kayla Sanchez – ENS – 2:06.37
4.    Kelsey Wog – CAC – 2:07.04
5.    Siobhan-Marie O’Connor – LON – 2:07.38
6.    Ella Eastin – LAC – 2:07.71
7.    Mary-Sophie Harvey – ENS – 2:08.01
8.    Kathleen Baker – LAC – 2:08.08

After the front half, London’s Sydney Pickrem had a slight lead over Condor Melanie Margalis, who was undefeated in the IM events. However, it was Pickrem who held off Margalis for first place. Sneaking in for second place over Condor breaststroker Kelsey Wog was Energy Standard’s Kayla Sanchez.

A Canadian-heavy field, with three of the top four coming from Canada. London gets the win with Pickrem, but Cali goes 2-4 to lead in event points. Energy Standard taking 3-7 hurts, with Cali surging. London goes 1-6 as they continue to be the team to beat.

Men’s 50 Fly

  • World Record: 21.75, Nicholas Santos (BRA), 2018
  • U.S. Open Record: 22.21, Caeleb Dressel (USA), 2019

1.    Caeleb Dressel – CAC – 22.06 *U.S. Open record
2.    Chad le Clos – ENS – 22.48
3.    Florent Manaudou – ENS – 22.53
4.    Tom Shields – LAC – 22.80
4.    John Shebat – CAC – 22.80
6.    Jack Conger – LAC – 22.98
7.    Vini Lanza – LON – 22.99
8.    Kirill Prigoda – LON – 23.98

It was Condor Caeleb Dressel with his second win of the day, who earned his second U.S. Open record of the day as well. Behind him were Energy’s Chad le Clos and Florent Manaudou for a crucial 2-3 finish.

Another win for Dressel, though an Energy Standard 2-3 is going to keep things from getting too lopsided in the battle for second. Meanwhile London takes 7th and 8th, as butterfly has clearly been a weakness, despite some strong personnel. It was a brutally close field from second to seventh.

Women’s 50 Fly

  • World Record: 24.38, Therese Alshammar (SWE), 2009
  • U.S. Open Record: 24.81, Beryl Gastaldello (FRA), 2019

1.    Beryl Gastaldello – LAC – 24.88
2.    Sarah Sjostrom – ENS – 25.03
3.    Marie Wattel – LON – 25.17
4.    Kelsi Dahlia – CAC – 25.22
5.    Faria Osman – LAC – 25.51
6.    Holly Barratt – LON – 25.63
7.    Anastasiya Shkurdai – ENS – 25.77
8.    Natalie Hinds – CAC – 25.91

LA Current’s Beryl Gastaldello continues to be a team player for her squad as she utilized her impressive turnover to remain undefeated in the 50 fly. Behind her was Energy’s Sarah Sjostrom who settled for another silver, but was able to hold off London’s Marie Wattel by 0.15s. Despite a brilliant underwater, Condor Kelsi Dahlia could only manage 4th place.

Beryl Gastaldello continues to be a major bright spot for LA, winning their first event of the day. She beats 50 fly all-star Sarah Sjostrom in a pretty major upset – those two didn’t meet at all in group matches or in the derbies. Cali’s momentum dropped a little with a 4-8 finish, though Energy Standard (2-7) didn’t really have the depth to take over.

Men’s 100 Back

  • World Record: 48.88, Xu Jiayu (CHN), 2018
  • U.S. Open Record: 48.92, Matt Grevers (USA), 2015

1.    Guilherme Guido – LON – 49.50
2.    Kliment Kolesnikov – ENS – 49.53
3.    Evgeny Rylov – ENS – 49.55
4.    Ryan Murphy – LAC – 49.88
5.    Matt Grevers – LAC – 49.95
6.    Christian Diener – LON – 50.45
7.    Radoslaw Kawecki – CAC – 51.01
8.    Mitch Larkin – CAC – 51.42

It was a tight race for the men’s back, as 0.45s separated the top 5 swimmers who were all under 50 seconds. In the end, it was clutch backstroker Guilherme Guido who won yet another day 2 event for the Roar. Rounding out the top 3 were Energy Standard teammates Kliment Kolesnikov and Evgeny Rylov.

Guido remains a breakout star for London, and he wins a clutch 100 back here against a very, very stacked field. Energy Standard’s duo of Russians went 2-3, which made it all the more important for Guido to get the win. LA was 4-5, but that’s mildly disappointing compared to the names on their roster – two former Olympic champs. Cali really struggled here, with 7th and 8th place in a big points loss to the top two teams.

Women’s 100 Back

1.    Minna Atherton – LON – 55.09 *U.S. Open record
2.    Olivia Smoliga – CAC – 55.98
3.    Emily Seebohm – ENS – 56.54
4.    Kylie Masse – CAC – 56.55
5.    Amy Bilquist – LAC – 57.33
6.    Georgia Davies – ENS – 57.74
7.    Kathleen Baker – LAC – 58.89
8.    Holly Barratt – LON – 1:00.27

After Condor Olivia Smoliga took out Roar’s Minna Atherton in the 50 back yesterday, Atherton gained her first win of the finale with a new U.S. Open record. Energy Standard’s Emily Seebohm was able to touch out Condor Kylie Masse for 3rd place.

Another win for London, this time behind Atherton by a wide margin. However, they also took 8th to slow team points a little. Cali’s 2-4 was probably the best team finish. LA fell off with a 5-7.

Mixed 400 Free Relay

1.   Energy Standard 1 – 3:15.97
2.   London Roar 1 – 3:16.03
3.   Cali Condors 1 – 3:17.75
4.   London Roar 2 – 3:18.27
5.   Energy Standard 2 – 3:19.80
6.  Cali Condors 2 – 3:21.18
7.  LA Current 1 – 3:22.84
—  LA Current 2 – DQ

Once the women took their turn in the pool, it was between London Roar and Energy Standard. At the finish, Energy’s Penny Oleksiak held off London’s Emma McKeon for yet another Energy Standard relay win. Condor Natalie Hinds anchored Cali to a close third place finish to hold off London’s B-relay.

London put two relays in the top four, and are in prime position to win the meet, barring disaster in the skins. That’s despite a loss by a tenth to Energy Standard. ENS was 5th with their B, and are now two points ahead of Cali for second. LA’s A lost to B teams from Energy Standard and London Roar, as the Current are pretty well resigned to fourth.

Team Scores After Session 5:

  1. London Roar – 387
  2. Energy Standard – 365.5
  3. Cali Condors – 363.5
  4. LA Current – 282

Women’s 200 Fly

  • World Record: 1:59.61, Mireia Belmonte (ESP), 2014
  • U.S. Open Record: 2:03.39, Cammile Adams (USA), 2015

1.    Hali Flickinger – CAC – 2:05.12
2.    Mireia Belmonte – LON – 2:05.82
3.    Kelsi Dahlia – CAC – 2:06.09
4.    Holly Hibbot – LON – 2:06.21
5.    Ella Eastin – LAC – 2:06.43
6.    Mary-Sophie Harvey – ENS – 2:08.30
7.    Katie McLaughlin – LAC – 2:08.80
8.    Anastasiya Shkurdai – ENS – 2:12.35

Out of lanes 7 and 8 were Condor flyers Hali Flickinger and Kelsi Dahlia who controlled the majority of the race. In the final 15 meters, London’s Mireia Belmonte had a last-minute charge in attempt to run down the Condors, managing 2nd place over Dahlia.

Big event for Cali and London, who sweep the top four places. Cali should move past Energy Standard for second with a 1-3 finish. Flickinger has dominated this event in her regular season matches. Meanwhile London goes 2-4 to further solidify their big lead. Energy Standard going 6-8 doesn’t help their cause, though the Skins should be good for them.

Men’s 200 Fly

1.    Daiya Seto – ENS – 1:48.77 *U.S. Open record
2.    Jack Conger – LAC – 1:50.46
3.    Chad le Clos – ENS – 1:50.63
4.    Tom Shields – LAC – 1:51.04
5.    James Guy – LON – 1:51.94
6.    Vini Lanza – LON – 1:53.02
7.    Jan Switkowski – CAC – 1:53.36
8.    Mark Szaranek – CAC – 1:55.67

Energy’s Daiya Seto stormed ahead for the win, breaking the U.S Open record and flirted with his 2018 world record. Out of lane one, Jack Conger of the LA Current stopped Energy’s Chad le Clos from a second place finish.

Energy Standard fires back. If they’re going to retake second, they’ll need to be really good from here on out. Seto’s win (and a dominating one at that, with no one within 1.7 seconds), plus a third from Le Clos is a major points haul. London struggled (5th/6th), but not as hard as Cali (7th/8th).

Team Scores Heading Into Skins:

  1. London Roar – 406
  2. Energy Standard – 383.5
  3. Cali Condors – 381.5
  4. LA Current – 300

Women’s 50 Free Skins

Round 1:

1.    Cate Campbell – LON – 23.46**
2.    Sarah Sjostrom – ENS – 23.66**
3.    Femke Heemskerk – ENS – 23.72**
4.    Emma McKeon – LON – 23.87**
5.    Kasia Wasick – CAC – 23.88
6.    Beryl Gastaldello – LAC – 24.01
7.    Olivia Smoliga – CAC – 24.08
8.    Farida Osman – LAC – 24.45

**advance to semi-finals

With no Cali Condors into the second round, the finish order gets pretty well locked in. London and Energy Standard should get major boosts out of round 1. The top four are pretty loaded, too, and it was hard to project it breaking any other way, besides maybe Gastaldello making round 2.

Round 2:

1.    Sarah Sjostrom – ENS – 23.98**
2.    Cate Campbell – LON – 24.19**
3.    Femke Heemskerk – ENS – 24.21
4.    Emma McKeon – 24.48

**advance to finals

One each for Energy Standard and London into the final. It was the do-everything star Sjostrom and the pure sprinter Campbell into the final, though Sjostrom looks tough to beat after another 23. Either way, we’re happy to see a meaningful skins final – one not stacked with two teammates.

Round 3:

1.    Sarah Sjostrom – ENS – 24.32
2.    Cate Campbell – LON – 25.63

Men’s 50 Free Skins

Round 1:

1.    Florent Manaudou – ENS – 20.84**
2.    Caeleb Dressel – CAC – 20.89**
3.    Nathan Adrian – LAC – 20.98**
4.    Ben Proud – ENS – 21.00**
5.    Kyle Chalmers – LON – 21.11
6.    Duncan Scott – LON – 21.28
7.    Michael Chadwick – LAC – 21.37
8.    Bowe Becker – CAC – 21.50

**advance to semi-finals

Another great finish for Energy Standard, who are coming on very strong and trying to steal this meet through the skins. Two into the top 8, joining two American standouts. Dressel is still the clear favorite, but Energy Standard has a great shot at putting two in the top three. It’ll probably be 2-4 for Energy Standard, with Manaudou making the final. It’ll be a reprise of Group A in the final tonight. That should give Energy Standard the team points win, too, if our math is correct.

Round 2:

1.    Caeleb Dressel – CAC – 21.76**
2.    Florent Manaudou – ENS – 22.19**
3.    Nathan Adrian – LAC – 22.43
4.    Ben Proud – ENS – 23.12

**advance to finals

Round 3:

1.    Caeleb Dressel – CAC – 21.46
2.   Florent Manaudou – ENS – 23.83

  • CHAMPION: Energy Standard – 453.5 points
  • RUNNER-UP: London Roar – 444 points
  • THIRD: Cali Condors – 415.5 points
  • FOURTH: LA Current – 318 points

Las Vegas Finale MVP

ISL Season MVP

In This Story

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Woke Stasi
11 months ago

GETCHER TWO CENTS IN #1: which is the faster, more impressive Caeleb short-course 50 swim: 1) his 17.63 yds at 2018 NCAAs (upvote); or, his 20.24 scm WR yesterday (downvote)?

DresselApologist
Reply to  Woke Stasi
11 months ago

NCAAs just because it’s .84 faster than any other swim in history

cynthia curran
Reply to  DresselApologist
11 months ago

Good point, most of the European Countries don’t have college swimming. The US teams lacked the college swimmers which gave the European teams an advantage.

Troyy
Reply to  cynthia curran
11 months ago

That’s their mistake for not recruiting outside the US.

seli’s car
Reply to  Woke Stasi
11 months ago

The real question now is what does these translate to in LCM🤔

Ragnar
Reply to  seli’s car
11 months ago

With a 20.77 next summer

ERVINFORTHEWIN
Reply to  Ragnar
11 months ago

yeah , that Cielo record is going down in 2020

Swimmerinlane9
11 months ago

Anyone got a link to espn3 they wanna share? ;$

Woke Stasi
11 months ago

GETCHER TWO CENTS IN #2: If Ryan Lochte makes the 2020 US Olympic team, is he more likely to do it by: 1) finishing in the top 6 in the 200 free (upvote); or, 2) finishing in the top 2 in the 200 IM (downvote)?

About Nick Pecoraro

Nick Pecoraro

Nick Pecoraro has had a huge passion for swimming since his first dive in the pool, instantly becoming drawn to the sport. He was a breaststroker and IMer when competing, but still uses the sport as his go-to cardio. SwimSwam has become an outlet for him to continue showing his …

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