Colorado Wins 5 Straight at 2015 ECC National Championship

The following is a report submitted by meet hosts Georgia Tech and written by Kevin Gell:

12 April 2015 | By Kevin Gell

After 53 events, the Colorado Buffaloes have secured their 5th National title within the club swimming community. With 74 attending teams, the Buffs were able to eke out a final combined score of 1,266.5. This topped the second place Gators (1,147 points). Ohio State took 3rd (1,085.5 points), Colorado Mesa was 4th (897.5 points), and Penn State (691.5) rounded out the top 5.

The Women’s finals were highlighted by Illinois’ Melissa Andruzzi, who swam 51.42 in the 100 Freestyle to claim her 5th win and 5th meet record of the weekend. Andruzzi was the highest scoring female athlete at the meet. Her high point counterpart on the men’s side was Jacob Johnson of Duke, who won the 100 Butterfly today (49.27) along with the 50 Freestyle and 100 Backstroke during the Saturday session.

Other event winners on the final day of competition include ECU’s Erin Mahoney (27.95) and Florida’s Jeff Reardon (23.25) in the 50 Backstroke. NC State’s Julianna Prim swam a meet record 56.99 to join Johnson as the 2015 100 Butterfly Champion. Meanwhile, OSU touted its breaststroke dominance as Nicole Gill and Andrew Brower swam 30.84 and 25.35, respectively, to earn gold in the 50 Breaststroke. In the 100 Freestyle, Florida’s James Turner swam 45.48 to claim the 100 Freestyle title along with Andruzzi. Colorado’s only win of the day came in the final individual event, the 100 IM, as Casey Wilson touched the wall in 1:00.03. Wilson’s performance was followed by Brower’s 100 IM; he swam 51.51 to claim a second title on day three. The meet concluded with the 4×50 Freestyle Relay. Colorado Mesa took an early lead in the women’s event and held on to touch the wall first with a time of 1:40.71. The Florida men capped off an excellent meet with a close win over Colorado Mesa. The Gators swam to a time of 1:24.52 and solidified their men’s team title. On the women’s side, the Lady Buffs were able to once again claim victory.

The top five women’s teams were Colorado, Ohio State, Colorado Mesa, Northeastern, and North Carolina State. The men’s team race ended with Florida taking a commanding victory over Ohio State, Colorado, Penn State, and Colorado Mesa.

All in all, the 2015 ECC lived up to its hype, serving as an exciting, fast paced, and competitive opportunity for more than 1500 collegiate club swimmers. Over the three day, five session meet, there were a total of 13 records broken. These include Alaina Gossett’s 200 Backstroke (2:06.65), Juliana Prim’s 100 and 200 Butterfly (56.99 and 2:05.93, respectively), Melissa Andruzzi’s 200 IM, 400 IM, 200 Breaststroke, 200 Freestyle, and 100 Freestyle (2:06.63, 4:30.94, 2:18.11, 1:51.09, and 51.42, respectively), Andrew Brower’s 200 Breaststroke (2:00.62), Maddie Sibilia’s 100 Freestyle (10:51.80), UVA men’s 4×200 Freestyle Relay (6:56.44), UCF men’s 4×100 Medley Relay (3:17.98), and Colorado women’s 4×50 Medley Relay (1:50.67). The competition this year was tougher than ever, but it is clear that every swimmer rose to the occasion and has left his or her mark on the 2015 ECC Collegiate Club National Swim & Dive Championship.

Courtesy of Cici Zhang

Courtesy of Cici Zhang

Courtesy of Cici Zhang

Courtesy of Cici Zhang

Courtesy of Cici Zhang

Courtesy of Cici Zhang

Courtesy of Cici Zhang

Courtesy of Cici Zhang

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Glenny

Very fast times at this meet. Great to see people like James Turner and Andrew Brower swim. Also Florida men took the 400 medley relay title not UCF, it was a touch pad error that was corrected. Also congratulations to Colorado on their 5th title.

About Jared Anderson

Jared Anderson

Jared Anderson swam for nearly twenty years. Then, Jared Anderson stopped swimming and started writing about swimming. He's not sick of swimming yet. Swimming might be sick of him, though. Jared was a YMCA and high school swimmer in northern Minnesota, and spent his college years swimming breaststroke and occasionally pretending …

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