2019 Pan American Games: Day 1 Finals Live Recap

2019 PAN AMERICAN GAMES

  • Villa Deportiva Nacional – Videna, Lima, Peru
  • Tuesday, August 6th – Saturday, August 10th (pool swimming)
  • Prelims 11 AM / Finals 8:30 PM (local time/US Central Time)
  • Official Website
  • Entry List
  • Live Results

Tonight’s finals will feature the men’s and and women’s 400 freestyle, 100 breaststroke, 200 butterfly, and men’s and women’s 4 x 100 freestyle relays.

Delfina Pignatiello holds the top seed going into the women’s 400 freestyle, but a cluster of 4:12s from Canadians  Alyson Ackman and Danica Ludlow give the Argentine distance star no room to relax.

Fernando Scheffer and Luiz Altamir Melo, both of Brazil, will try to hunt down Andrew Abruzzo of the United States in the men’s 400 freestyle.

Americans Cody Miller and Kevin Cordes square off against Brazilian duo Felipe Lima and Joao Gomes Junior in the 100 breaststroke, while Miller’s training partner Annie Lazor will attempt to hold on to her number-1 seed in the 100 breaststroke in tonight’s final.

WOMEN’S 400 FREE – FINALS

  • World record: 3:56.46, Katie Ledecky (USA), 2016
  • Pan Ams record: 4:08.42, Emily Overholt (CAN), 2015
  • Defending champ: 4:08.42, Emily Overholt (CAN)

Top 3:

  1. GOLD: Delfina Pignatiello, Argentina, 4:10.86
  2. SILVER: Danica Ludlow, Canada, 4:11.97
  3. BRONZE: Alyson Ackman, Canada, 4:12.05

Delfina Pignatiello had the early lead at 100 with a 1:00.43 at the turn, but was quickly caught by Danica Ludlow from Canada, who came to her shoulder, and then was joined by Alyson Ackman at 200. Pignatiello retained the lead at 250.

Pignatiello asserted herself down the final stretch to win gold in 4:10.86, getting to the wall a full second ahead of silver medalist Danica Ludlow, who won silver in 4:11.97. Ackman won bronze in 4:12.05.

American Mariah Denigan made a charge over the final 150 meters, but couldn’t quite catch the Canadians and finished in 4th in 4:12.23.

Brazilians Aline Rodrigues aand Viviane Jungblut, who won bronze in the open water 10k, placed 4th and 5th, respectively. Mexico’s Allyson Macias Alba placed 7th, and Team USA’s Becca Mann 8th.

Maria Alvarez from Colombia had the early lead, and she distanced herself with every 50 to a final time of 4:21.44 to win the ‘B’ final in 4:21.44, nearly a full three seconds ahead of Gisella Gursoy of Trinidad and Tobago, who finished 2nd in the ‘B’ final in 4:24.17.

MEN’S 400 FREE – FINALS

  • World record: 3:40.07, Paul Biedermann (GER), 2009
  • Pan Ams record: 3:48.29, Ryan Cochrane (CAN), 2015
  • Defending champ: 3:48.29, Ryan Cochrane (CAN)

Top 3:

  1. GOLD: Andrew Abruzzo, United States, 3:48.41
  2. SILVER: Fernando Scheffer, Brazil, 3:49.60
  3. BRONZE: Luiz Altamir Melo, Brazil, 3:49.91

Venezuela’s Rafael Zambrano had the lead through the first 250 meters of the men’s 400 freestyle final, though Brazil’s Fernando Scheffer and American Andrew Abruzzo surpassed at 300 meters. Abruzzo upped his tempo and his kick to overtake the field over the final 75 meters to win in 3:48.41. Brazilians Scheffer and Luiz Altamir Melo finished 2nd and 3rd, respectively, in 3:49.50 and 3:49.91.

American Chris Weiser finished 4th in 3:50.39, Venezuela’s Zambrano 5th in 3:52.27, Ricardo Vargas of Mexico 6th, Argentina’s Marcelo Acosta 7th in 3:54.20, and Colombia’s Santiago Corredor 8th in 3:56.00.

WOMEN’S 100 BREAST – FINALS

  • World record: 1:04.13, Lilly King (USA), 2017
  • Pan Ams record: 1:05.64, Katie Meili (USA), 2015
  • Defending champ: 1:05.64, Katie Meili (USA)

Top 3:

  1. GOLD: Annie Lazor, United States, 1:06.94
  2. SILVER: Julia Sebastian, Argentina, 1:07.09
  3. BRONZE: Faith Knelson, Canada, 1:07.42

Faith Knelson from Canada had the early lead at the 50-meter turn, hitting the wall at 31.13, just .12 ahead of Team USA’s Annie Lazor and .19 ahead of 2016 U.S. Olympian Molly Hannis.

Down the final stretch, Argentina’s Julia Sebastian narrowed the gap from lane 7 and hit the wall in 1:07.09, good for silver. Canadian Knelson made the podium placing 3rd in 1:07.42.

Mexico’s Byanca Rodriguez placed 4th in 1:07.74, while Brazilian Jhennifer Alves Conceicao was 5th in 1:08.00. American Molly Hannis, who was 3rd at 50 meters, finished 6th in 1:08.32. Mexico’s Esther Medina was 7th in 1:10.04, while Venezuela’s Mercedes Toledo rounded out the championship final in 8th in 1:10.20.

Argentina’s Macarena Ceballos won the ‘B’ final of the women’s 100 breaststroke in 1:09.48. Brazil’s Pamela Alencar de Souza touched 2nd in 1:10.78, and Bahamanian Laura Morley 3rd in 1:11.00.

MEN’S 100 BREAST – FINALS

  • World record: 56.88, Adam Peaty (GBR), 2019
  • Pan Ams record: 59.21, Felipe Silva (BRA), 2015
  • Defending champ: 59.21, Felipe Silva (BRA)

Top 3:

  1. GOLD: Joao Gomes, Brazil, 59.51
  2. SILVER: Cody Miller, United States, 59.57
  3. BRONZE: Kevin Cordes, United States, 1:00.27

Brazil’s Felipe Lima was out fast over the first 50 meters of the 100 breast, splitting a 27.25. American Kevin Cordes held down 2nd in 27.53, while Brazil’s Joao Gomes lingered in 3rd, just .18 behind Cordes at the 50-meter turn.

American Cody Miller charged over the 2nd 50 to nearly catch Brazilian Gomes, but due to a long finished was out-touched by Gomes, who touched first in 59.51, just .06 ahead of Miller who finished in 59.57. Cordes took the bronze medal in 1:00.27, while early leader Lima from Brazil placed 4th in 1:00.36.

Colombia’s Jorge Murillo placed 5th in 1:00.91, while Mexican teammates Miguel de Lara Ojeda and Mauro Castillo finished 6th and 7th, respectively. Martin Alvez from Argentina rounded out the top-8 in 1:02.09.

WOMEN’S 200 FLY – FINALS

  • World record: 2:01.81, Liu Zige (CHN), 2009
  • Pan Ams record: 2:07.64, Kathleen Hersey (USA), 2007
  • Defending champ: 2:07.68, Audrey Lacroix (CAN)

Top 3:

  1. GOLD: Virginia Bardach, Argentina, 2:10.87
  2. SILVER: Mary-Sophie Harvey, Canada, 2:11.68
  3. BRONZE: Meghan Small, United States, 2:12.51

Mary-Sophie Harvey was out to an early lead in the women’s 200 fly, splitting a 29.08 to American Sarah Gibson‘s 29.21 and Canada’s Danielle Hanus‘ 29.69.

Gibson had taken the lead at 100 meters, turning in 1:02.72, just ahead of Argentina’s Virginia Martin, pushing early leader Harvey of Canada to 3rd at the 100-meter turn.

By the 150-meter turn, Argentina’s Martin was in control, turning in 1:36.29, a full .59 ahead of Americans Gibson and Meghan Small. Martin charged hard and distanced herself down the final stretch to win by nearly a full second, hitting the wall first in 2:10.87. Canada’s Mary-Sophie Harvey was 3rd in 2:12.68 and American Meghan Small 3rd in 2:12.51.

The next three finishers were very bunched up: Mexico’s Diana Luna placed 4th in 2:13.02; American Sarah Gibson finished 5th in 2:13.08; Mexico’s Maria Mata placed 6th in 2:13.12.

Canada’s Danielle Hanus was 7th in 2:13.95, and Venezuela’s Isabelle Paez finished 8th in 2:15.53.

MEN’S 200 FLY – FINALS

Top 3:

  1. GOLD: Leonardo de Deus, Brazil, 1:55.85
  2. SILVER: Sam Pomajevich, United States, 1:57.35
  3. BRONZE: Jonathan Gomez, Colombia,

Tom Shields was out quick in the first 50 of the men’s 200 fly, splitting a 25.36 on the first 50. Leonardo de Deus overtook Shields and the rest of the field by 100, and by 150 meters was over a body length ahead of the rest of the field, splitting a 1:24.60, a full 1.2 ahead of countryman Luiz Altamir Melo in his 2nd final of the night, while American Sam Pomajevich moved into 3rd, 1.42 seconds behind de Deus but only .22 behind Altamir Melo.

De Deus hung on for the gold, touching in 1:55.86. For de Deus, the win tonight marks his 3rd-straight Pan American Games gold medal in the 200 butterfly. Pomajevich touched 2nd in 1:57.35, and Colombia’s Jonathan Gomez 3rd in 1:57.75.

Brazil’s Altamir Melo faded to 4th in 1:57.78. Mexican teammates Jose Martinez and Hector Ruvalcaba finished 5th and 6th in 1:59.23 and 2:00.69, respectively. Argentina’s Nicolas Deferrari was 7th in 2:01.84, and American Tom Shields 8th in 2:06.65.

WOMEN’S 4×100 FREE RELAY – FINALS

  • World record: 3:30.05, Australia (Jack/Campbell/McKeon/Campbell), 2018
  • Pan Ams record: 3:36.80, Canada (Mainville/Williams/Savard/Van Landeghem), 2015
  • Defending champ: 3:36.80, Canada (Mainville/Williams/Savard/Van Landeghem

Top 3:

  1. GOLD: United States, 3:39.59
  2. SILVER: Brazil, 3:40.39
  3. BRONZE: Canada, 3:41.01

Though Brazil had the led for the first 200 meters thanks to strong legs from Etiene Medeiros (55.54) and Larissa Martins (54.46), but the United States came within 2/10ths as the 2nd leg of the American relay, blasting a 54.51 to put the United States 1:55.18 to Brazil’s 1:55.00. Kendyl Stewart surged on the third leg with a 55.05 split, maintaining a narrow lead over Brazil, who with Manuella Duarte hung just .05 behind at the 300-meter exchange.

Margo Geer dove in for the United States to produce a 54.36 split over the final 100 meters to pull the U.S. ahead and win 3:30.59 to Brazil’s 3:40.39.

Canada’s Alexia Zevnik was making up ground in the final 100, and her split of 54.03 was the fastest in the field. Canada finished 3rd overall in 3:41.01.

MEN’S 4×100 FREE RELAY – FINALS

  • World record: 3:08.24, USA (Phelps/Weber-Gale/Jones/Lezak), 2008
  • Pan Ams record: 3:13.66, Brazil (Santana/de Lucca/Fratus/Chierighini), 2015
  • Defending champ: 3:13.66, Brazil (Santana/de Lucca/Fratus/Chierighini)

Top 3:

  1. GOLD: Brazil, 3:12.61
  2. SILVER: United States, 3:14.94
  3. BRONZE: Mexico, 3:17.70

Breno Correia got Brazil off to an early lead with a 48.82 split over the first 100 meters, but was closely pursued by Team USA’s Michael Chadwick, who led off in a 48.92. Marcelo Chierighini went in next for Brazil and produced the fastest split of the entire field with a 47.45, bringing the Brazilians to a 1:36.27 at 200 meters to the Americans’ 1:37.77. Bruno Fratus and Pedro Spajari finished things off for Brazil, burying the Americans with splits of 48.18 and 48.16, respectively. Nathan Adrian anchored for the U.S. contingent with the 2nd-fastest time in the field, a 47.70. The team from Mexico got to the wall for bronze in 3:17.70, more than a second ahead of the 4th-place-finishers from Venezuela.

In This Story

321
Leave a Reply

123 Comment threads
198 Thread replies
2 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
109 Comment authors
newest oldest most voted
Fly

What time do finals start for est?

DLSwim

9:30

9:30PM

50free

Can’t find it on espn

tm71

ESPN U on cable
ESPN 3 online

50free

Thank u. Was just a bit early

RSPC

It’s just for the US 🙁

Many countries have their own streams. Try searching YouTube. Which country are you in? Mexico’s official live stream is happening on YouTube, for example.

RSPC

I’m in Argentina, cheering on all my former teammates!!! Just found a link that works. Thanks Braden, keep up with the amazing job you do!!!

Its me

Where? Do you have the link?

Ummm, I’m actually not sure if it’s live or posted afterward. Here’s prelims, you may be able to search and find them livve (I’m not in Mexico, so can’t tell what’s just geoblocked for me): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bTI0yjJ9pgs

Here’s the full list of completed event replays: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLBpuIdeeb2X76Opp8EkGbuXuYtBiq988d

Its me

Thanks!!!

SeanSwim

ANONYMOUS PREDICTION GAME
Make your predictions – and once submitted you will see the overall data of what everyone picked in graphs. Your predictions are completely anonymous. If you think I should do this for DAY 2 Finals LIKE this comment, if you don’t like this idea DISLIKE this comment.
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScngMxy3E0a2egMCOcM28Sey50xgloh8p1BVAi0VgFWmfETNw/viewform

VGM

Awesome! That was fun, thank you! Love the extra question too 🙂

Nance

Very cool … and thanks for the graphs in there, too

About Reid Carlson

Reid Carlson

Reid Carlson originally hails from Clay Center, Kansas, where he began swimming at age six.  At age 14 he began swimming club year-round and later with his high school team, making state all four years.  He was fortunate enough to draw the attention of Kalamazoo College where he went on to …

Read More »

Want to take your swimfandom to the next level?

Subscribe to SwimSwam Magazine!