2014 Pan Pacific Championships – Day 1 Finals Live Recap

  141 Troy Gennaro | August 21st, 2014 | Africa, Asia, Australia, Brazil, Latin America & Caribbean, Canada, Featured, International, News, Previews & Recaps

2014 Pan Pacific Championships

The weather has not been the most cooperative in the Gold Coast for the first day of the Pan Pacific Championships. It has been very cold at the pool, with very strong winds coming from the south and scattered showers in the area.

For a full recap of the morning prelims session from SwimSwam’s Jared Anderson, click here. 

Women’s 200 free

Meet record: 1:56.10, Allison Schmitt (USA), 2010
American record: 1:53.61, Allison Schmitt
Australian record: 1:55.68, Emma McKeon
Canadian record: 1:56.97, Genevieve Saumur
Japanese record: 1:57.37, Haruka Ueda
Australia All-comers record: 1:55.52, Laure Manaudou (FRA)

It appears that Missy Franklin was just testing the waters this morning during her prelims swim. She came back tonight as the top seed in the B-final t0 win the heat with her time of 1:56.04. That swim broke the previous meet record set in 2010 by Allison Schmitt. Australian Emma McKeon was second with her time of 1:57.21, and Camille Cheng finished third in the B-final at 1:58.99.

Franklin’s meet record didn’t last long, however, because Katie Ledecky had something to say about it. Ledecky won the A-final of the women’s 200 free with a faster meet record time of 1:55.74. Australian Bronte Barratt was second with her time of 1:57.22. Shannon Vreeland reached in for the bronze at 1:57.38.

Melanie Schlanger was just off her time from this morning, which pushed her back into fourth place. Her final time was 1:57.39. Canadian Sam Cheveton finished fifth with her time of 1:58.96.

With their performances tonight, Katie Ledecky and Missy Franklin will be officially added to USA Swimming’s 2015 World Championship Roster for the individual 200 freestyle.

Men’s 200 free

Meet record: 1:44.75, Ian Thorpe (AUS), 2002
American record: 1:42.96, Michael Phelps
Australian record: 1:44.06, Ian Thorpe
Canadian record: 1:46.40, Brent Hayden
Japanese record:1:45.24, Sho Uchida
Australia All-comers record: 1:43.86, Michael Phelps (USA)

Australian Thomas Fraser-Holmes won the A-final of the men’s 200 freestyle with a 1:45.98. That is close to a second drop from his morning swim. Kosuke Hagino of Japan reached in for second place at 1:46.08 followed by the other Australian finalist, Cameron McEvoy at 1:46.36 for third.

The Americans finished fourth and fifth with a 1:46.45 from Conor Dwyer and a 1:46.75 from Ryan Lochte. Neither of those times were that spectacular, but Lochte’s time was fast enough to overtake Matt McLean’s individual 200 freestyle 2015  World Championship roster spot.

Matt McLean won the B-final with his time of 1:47.16, touching just ahead of Australian David McKeon at 1:47.48.

Women’s 100 back

Meet record: 59.34, Emily Seebohm (AUS), 2010
American record: 58.33, Missy Franklin
Australian record: 58.23, Emily Seebohm
Canadian record: 59.68, Sinead Russell
Japanese record: 58.70, Aya Terakawa
Australia All-comers record: 58.92, Emily Seebohm (AUS)

Emily Seebohm cracked 59 seconds for the second time this year to win the women’s 100 backstroke with her time of 58.84. She led her teammate, Belinda Hocking, to the wall for a 1-2 finish. Hocking reached in as the only other swimmer to break a minute at 59.78. Missy Franklin finished third in this event with her time of 1:00.30. Missy has won this event for the past two years (2012 Olympics, 2013 World Championships) and has beat Seebohm each time in doing so. It is not clear at this point if Missy was still struggling because of her injury, or if the Australians just had better swims. Either way, a sub-59 second 100 backstroke would have been very hard to top even if she was at her best. 58.9 is a great swim for Seebohm.

Japan’s Sayaka Akase was fourth at 1:00.65, followed by Dominique Bouchard of Canada with her time of 1:00.82 for fifth. Hilary Caldwell followed her Canadian teammate for sixth at 1:00.99 and American Liz Pelton finished 7th at 1:01.37.

In the B-final, Kathleen Baker had a huge swim, winning with her time of 1:00.35. That time would have put her fourth in the A-final just behind Franklin. As an American fighting for World Championship roster spots, that swim was another major victory for Baker. Her time of 1:00.35 bumps her ahead of Rachel Bootsma’s time from nationals, giving her the second roster spot on the 2015 World Championship Team in this event.

Men’s 100 back

Meet record: 52.91, Matt Grevers (USA), 2014
American record: 51.94, Aaron Peirsol
Australian record: 52.97, Hayden Stoeckel
Canadian record: 53.63, Pascal Wollach
Japanese record: 52.24, Ryosuke Irie
Australia All-comers record: 52.91, Matt Grevers (USA)

After breaking the Pan Pacs record this morning, Matt Grevers was touched out by Japan’s Ryosuke Irie for the Gold medal with his time of 53.02. Grevers finished second at 53.09. Ryan Murphy was third at 53.27, followed by Mitchell Larkin from Australia in fourth with his time of 53.28.

Ben Treffers was fifth with his time of 53.84, followed by Japan’s Junya Koga at 54.02 for sixth.

The B-final was very exciting, as David Pummer came in to win with his time of 53.19. That time was faster than Ryan Murphy’s time from nationals, which put the pressure on Murphy right before he jumped in the water for his race. Murphy had to finish faster than 52.19 to hold on to his World Championship roster spot in this race. As you already know, Murphy finished at 53.27, which means David Plummer has bumped Murphy from the 2015 World Championship roster. This will give Plummer his second swim, as he is already on the team for the 50 backstroke.

Women’s 800 free (last heat)

Meet record: 8:16.22, Janet Evans (USA), 1989
American record: 8:11.00, Katie Ledecky
Australian record: 8:19.76, Jessica Ashwood
Canadian record: 8:20.91, Brittany MacLean
Japanese record: 8:23.68, Sachiko Yamada
Australia All-comers record: 8:18.52, Kate Zeigler (USA)

In 1989 at the age of 17, Janet Evans set the World Record at this meet with her time of 8:16.22. Today, Katie Ledekcy was almost able to do the same thing. She won the event, just missing her World Record with her time of 8:11.35. That time, however, will stand as the new Pan Pacs and Austalian All-comers record. Lauren Boyle finished second for New Zealand with her time of 8:18.87. Canada’s Brittany Maclean finished third with her time of 8:20.02.

Becca Mann finished fourth, ahead of Cierra Runge, with a time of 8:22.45. That time is faster than Runge’s from Nationals, which will bump Runge off the 2015 World Championship Roster. Becca Mann now has the second roster spot behind Ledecky for the women’s 800 freestyle. Cierra Runge finished fifth tonight with her time of 8:25.17.

Andreina Pinto from Venezuela finished 6th with her time of 8:30.66, followed by American Haley Anderson in seventh at 8:30.87.

Women’s 200 fly

Meet record: 2:05.40, Jessica Schipper (AUS), 2006
American record: 2:04.14, Mary DeScenza
Australian record: 2:03.41, Jessica Schipper
Canadian record: 2:05.95, Audrey Lacroix
Japanese record: 2:04.69, Natsumi Hoshi
Australia All-comers record: 2:05.81, Susan O’Neill (AUS)

Cammile Adams claimed the second Gold medal in a row for the United States winning the 200 butterfly with her time of 2:06.61. Natsumi Hoshi from Japan was second with her time of 2:06.78, followed by American Katie McLaughlin in third at 2:07.08.

Miyu Nakano was fourth for Japan at 2:08.54 and Audrey Lacroix was fifth for Canada at 2:08.81.

Maya DiRado won the B-final of the women’s 200 fly with her time of 2:07.42. That time was faster than McLaughlin’s time from nationals, but McLaughlin improved during the A-final to secure the second 2015 World Championship roster spot. Cammile Adams and Katie McLaughlin will take the roster spots for this event at the 2015 World Champiosnhips.

Men’s 200 fly

Meet record: 1:53.80, Michael Phelps (USA), 2006
American record: 1:51.51, Michael Phelps
Australian record: 1:54.46, Nick D’Arcy
Canadian record: 1:57.01, Stefan Hirniak
Japanese record: 1:52.97, Takeshi Matsuda
Australia All-comers record: 1:52.09, Michael Phelps (USA)

Daiya Seto took home the gold medal for Japan with his winning time in the men’s 200 butterfly of 1:54.92. Leonoardo de Deus finished second, adding Brazil to the medal count, with his time of 1:55.28. Tyler Clary reached in to finish third with his time of 1:55.42.

Masato Sakai was fourth for Japan at 1:56.64, followed by Michael Meyer of South Africa in fifth at 1:58.33.

Even with Tom Shields‘ Disqualification this morning, he and Tyler Clary have earned their spots on the roster for the 2015 World Championships in this event.

Men’s 1500 free (last heat)

Meet record: 14:41.65, Grant Hackett (AUS), 2002
American record: 14:45.29, Larsen Jensen
Australian record: 14:34.56, Grant Hackett
Canadian record: 14:39.63, Ryan Cochrane
Japanese record: 14:54.80, Kohei Yamamoto
Australia All-comers record: 14:44.94, Grant Hackett (AUS)

Connor Jaeger won the final event of the day, touching out Canadian Ryan Cochrane to win the men’s 1500. Jaeger finished with his time of 14:51.79, just ahead of Cochrane’s 14:51.97. Australian Mack Horton finished third with his time of 14:52.78.

Finishing in fourth for Australia was Jordan Harrison at 14:53.65, and Michael McBroom was fifth with his time of 14:57.15.

Connor Jaeger and Michael McBroom will claim the roster spots for the 2015 World Championships in this event.

Comments

  1. Zanna says:
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    Probably unlikely but anybody with a live stream link?

  2. Zanna says:
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    Look like it’s raining at the pool!

  3. aswimfan says:
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    So I assume no livestreaming for the finals sessions?

  4. SVIRD says:
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    Very sad I can’t watch it live :( I suppose I’ll just follow along since I’ve already woken up for this (5am for me). If anybody found any method of watching this I would love them forever.

  5. Zanna says:
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    Maya Dirado wins B-Final 2.07.42.

    • Zanna says:
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      Great time! 2nd fastest American.

    • Duncan says:
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      How did she get a chance to swim in B final? she was not 3rd American in prelims. Could have been a big issue re American World Champs team if McLaughlin hadn’t had such a great final.

      • Danjohnrob says:
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        There were less than 16 people who didn’t scratch the event, so if there are empty lanes they let more athletes swim.

        • Duncan says:
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          That’s nice as a general concept, but the huge question, in case similar circumstances come up again, is what would have happened in the US Worlds selection process had McLaughlin done 2:07.50, slower than Dirado, when Dirado had not met the normal requirement of being in the top 3 from a country to get a second swim (max 2 in champs final).

  6. aswimfan says:
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    The Swimming Australia website is so bad. In terms of design, and available bandwith.

  7. Zanna says:
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    Ok, so all the B-Finals first.

  8. Zanna says:
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    Missy was just prob being cautious this morning. If she is hurting I doubt she would have swum both finals. Missy takes B-final 1.56.

  9. Zanna says:
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    Excited to see what Ledecky can do!

  10. Zanna says:
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    When all this is said and done, I hope someone posts the races here.

  11. Zanna says:
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    Katie 1.55.75!

  12. Philip Johnson says:
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    Bad weather, bad coverage (not you Swim Swam), and we’re going to see bad times. Ledecky should have been 1:54.

    • thomaslurzfan says:
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      Didnt you say that the mens 200m final will be better than at european championships? Not a very good call …

  13. Zanna says:
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    Fraser Holmes, Hagino and McEvoy for the 200free. Gah, Americans 4th and 5th. That 200 free relay may be in trouble.

  14. SVIRD says:
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    Based on the results from the men 200 free, I think USA’s 4×200 might be in trouble. Also sluggish times all around for men and women.

  15. Jane says:
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    Good to see Cf-H and Cammie Mc continue their Glasgow success. I agree that the US 4×200 relay is in danger, but I think (depending on his mood that day), that it means Phelps is more likely drafted in to the relay, he can step up!

  16. Zanna says:
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    58.84 win for Seebohm!

  17. Zanna says:
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    Hocking, 2nd. Missy 3rd.

  18. Zanna says:
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    Missy and Kathleen Baker makes the Pan Pacs team.

  19. SVIRD says:
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    Relay outlook for USA and Aussie in men’s 4×200 based on today’s 200 freestyles:

    USA:
    1:46.45 Dywer
    1:46.75 Lochte
    1:47.16 Mclean
    1:47.95 Malone
    TOTAL: 7:08.31

    Australia:
    1:45.98 Fraser-Holmes
    1:46.36 Mcevoy
    1:47.48 Mckeon
    1:48.97 Mckendry
    TOTAL: 7:08.79

    So USA has a very slight edge, but it’s close. Of course I’m only basing this off swimmers who swam the 200 today. Maybe USA will throw in Phelps, and I’m not sure if Australia has anybody else.

    • SVIRD says:
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      Japan looks like they have bronze locked up but I don’t figure they’ll contend for gold.

    • Thanos Mihas says:
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      us should be over 0.5 secs ahead in times to win because u have to factor in the home pool advantage for australia. the us might lose here, but they will not lose in 2015 and 2016 when phelps will be back on the team and dwyer will be at 145 or better.

    • jd14 says:
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      Any potential that the Aussies put Mack Horton on that relay at all?

    • Dee says:
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      Interesting, not as fast as I’d really expected from the US. After Glasgow and Scotland giving the Aussies that huge scare I thought they’d have little chance against the US. I am waiting to see the times from both Panpacs & Euros to see where we (Britain stand) – going on combined time before relay takeovers we are 7.07.5

  20. Zanna says:
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    Irie 53.02, Grevers 53.09, Murphy 53.27. 1st, 2nd and 3rd. Grevers and Plummer makes the Worlds Team.

  21. SVIRD says:
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    IRIE takes the 100 back. Not a great night for USA.

    • Zanna says:
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      Nope. They are swimming as if to qualify for worlds i.e. to be the top 2 americans and not to beat the Australians and others. That is why I hate this selection process for next year’s worlds.

    • Thanos Mihas says:
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      this sucks! that means murphy is out of the worlds team by 0.02. not even grevers could win. really a bad meet thus far!

    • Jane says:
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      Maybe I’m a bit more impartial being British. But I think you’re a bit extreme and quick to say it’s a bad meet. I think you have to take a bit of perspective and give credit where it is due.

      The Aussie’s didn’t do as expected in London 2012. They went back and reassessed, they are an improved team. Those who were on their first international teams in 2012/13 are now bedded in and hitting their stride. Then a few are having a second wind.

      I think previous success of the US team has inspired others internationally to really step up and improve. The US aren’t going to win everything. Besides, considering Grevers missed the 2010 pan pacs team, to get a silver in 2014 is a major improvement in the quad for him!

      The US will pick up momentum throughout the meet.

      Rant over!

      • SVIRD says:
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        I didn’t write the USA off to simply having a bad meet, just that this night hasn’t been great and could have gone better. (although that time by katie ledecky certainly improves things!)

        • Jane says:
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          Apologies. My comments were perhaps more directed to Thanas Mihas who appears to be in a more negative mood this morning.

    • HG says:
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      Irie days he is very happy to swim ( & win) in Aust as he was an exchange student here.

  22. Katie says:
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    Well I’m giving the gold, silver and bronze medal for live coverage of swimming unequivocally to the Americans! Living here in England, I get little coverage on how other international teams are getting on and rely on websites like these and live streams. Aussies, you’ve let the team down!

  23. Zanna says:
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    Katie 8.11.35. Just misses the WR.

    • Zanna says:
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      Her WR. Lol.

    • Thanos Mihas says:
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      out of the stars ONLY ledecky is swimming to her potential at this meet and during this season. i totally disagree with the previous poster who said our comments were too extreme. most top us swimmers are having an off year, some of the veterans have regressed and a good portion of young people have stagnated. but if you are going to have an off year this is the year to have it!

      • ERVINFORTHEWIN says:
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        Hey Man , stop your convulsed biased emotional responses towards the First results of a 5 day Big meet ! Give them space to express through the meet before coming to such idiotic conclusions . Usa team is doing it’s best , with it’s Up and down results . Australia has nobody in long distance within the first 8 ! Nobody is to be seen on Aussi’s men 200 butterfly . They won women’s 100 back and men’s 200 free . They have nobody in the medals on men’s 100 back . How should they react in your opinion to their respective medium results ???? Only UK is having a great year so far ;;;and well deserved .

        • Thanos Mihas says:
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          ok ervin i made one comment at 3 am that it was a “bad meet thus far” and that part of the team was having an off year (which is totally ok and understanble). but u took that comment way out of proportion. i am sure u see that there was no need for epithets and insults. that sounds so typical of the media anyway they cherry pick sonds bites, in this case written statements and go to town. how about when i praised clary for winning a medal in his weaker event ? how about praising adams for winning the 200 fly in best time and beating the world leader ? how about praising the progress of youngsters like mclaughling and baker ? obviously i balanced several positive comments with one or two negative comments, but u just picked on the negative. i am not totally begrudging you for that but there is no need to use insults when u have not even read half of my comments. i know in another post later you stated that “expectations are created by the mind” but that is partly true. expectations have been created by past achievements that unfortunately can not always be replicated. for better or far worse usa swimming has set up the bar very high for decades and even more so with phelps, lochte, frankling and now ledecky. so anything short of that will initially come accross as a letdown and/or disappointment. of course as the meet goes on our opinions can ebb and flow depending on the results and performances and i am sure there will be more constructive assessments at the end of the season.

  24. SVIRD says:
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    LEDECKY 8:11.35! Awesome swim.

  25. Zanna says:
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    Ledecky and Mann makes top 2 to Worlds.

  26. Zanna says:
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    Adams and Mcaughlin goes 1-3 in the 2fly.

  27. Zanna says:
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    Seto, De Heus, Clary 200fly

    • Thanos Mihas says:
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      clary at least got a medal in what seems to be his third or fourth best event. i think tyler should put his efforts on the 200 back and 400 im. unfortunately like another poster wrote shields is more of 100 fly swimmer, kalisz is a 400 im and clary is a 200 back/400 im so there will be no us swimmer to challenge le clos next year. by 2016 maybe seliskar will be a contender.

  28. Thanos Mihas says:
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    not counting ledecky’s almost WR 17 yr old mclaughlin had the swim of night so far for americans improving all the way to 207 and making the team. good decision to go to this meet instead of the YOG.

    • John says:
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      I agree with you that the US are having a bad meet thus far. I can’t see a video and I don’t know what the weather is like but some are going slower than in prelims never mind trials. 2:06 w fly? not interested……. she’d have gotten 2nd in US trials a third of a century ago. If Phelps does nothing else in his comeback he might be the only US male to get a gold here! I’m British and impartial but all we hear in the Commonwealths / Europeans is how the “major” event of the year is PanPacs and how the world had better look out when the Americans get going. Ledecky aside not happening in today’s events!

      • pol says:
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        Well Connon Jaeger just won the 1500m.

      • Jane says:
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        I didn’t say that there weren’t some disappointing times from swimmers one might expect or predict to do well which happen to be on the US team. If you look at the winning time for the 200m free in 2010 and 2014 there is quite a difference suggesting some below par swimmers. But I still stand that its a bit quick to say bad meet, even thus far. It’s all based on expectations, maybe rightly or wrongly, I have higher expectation of the Aussies?

        PanPacs are only the big meet if you deem it to be, I think a month ago I would’ve wholeheartedl agreed, but I’ve changed my opinion from PanPacs being the big meet and am starting to view it in a more equal place with Euros. The 100 breast with Peaty and Murdoch was an awesome race – then again I was able to stream that…

      • aswimfan says:
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        With the exception of Ledecky (and maybe Seebohm), almost all other top swimmers, not only US swimmers, are not having the best meet so far, time-wise.
        Majority of Australian swimmers seem to be having difficulty holding onto their taper one month after Commonwealth, with everyone bar Seebohm went slower, a few are swimming so much slower.

        On a special note, I feel sorry for Murphy, I hope he makes 2015 worlds team in 200 back.
        On a second special note, Ledecky is truly truly a remarkable swimmer.
        8:11 after a 1:55 earlier? outstanding.

        • Tm says:
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          Thank you for providing an honest assessment based on facts and backing up what I wrote earlier. A bit of an off meet and year isn’t a biased and emotional. The dude that made that comment obviously has not read what the French are saying about angel and bob bowman.

          • ERVINFORTHEWIN says:
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            the Only thing i will say to you is : expectations are for the mind only ! therefore , they will always be the rise of unecessary criticism due to the defeat of the expectations . See what u need to see , feel what u need to feel . Weak times maybe but Off meet after just one day of the 5 DAY meet is going way too early . See where u might assess things too fast . I am totally ok for not seing even one race , life goes on . Cheers

        • caliswimgrl says:
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          @Stagnation, I agree with you in looking at limits of human performance, athletes having an almost out of body experience in order to post a new world record, etc. Anyone can say, “Oh what an ordinary swim,” but let’s see you do it! I read an article recently that addressed the issue of modern equipment, playing fields, tracks, pools, clothing, etc., from different eras in sport. Human bodies can only improve so much. Other factors become more and more important. The point of Janet Evans swimming in Seoul or anywhere else back in that time compared to Ledecky in her skin suits with the pool technology and equipment used today is really interesting. Training methods today are based on what we learned from Evan’s era of swimming. I think we are spoiled by seeing unreal times posted by the very few amazing swimmers who come along very infrequently, especially when we can watch them a zillion times on the internet and basically get used to seeing that kind of performance, virtually speaking. I think about what it must be like to have that one scintillating peak performance and then not break that PR for four years or more, or ever again, even with tons of really tough training and self-discipline. It takes a lot of courage, especially when we all are whining about how “dull” or “off” their times are at a meet like Pan Pacs in the cold and wet of an Australian winter.

  29. HG says:
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    It has been a good racing meet.

    • HG says:
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      You can’t just judge it by the times or results. The rain lifted , the b finals were competitive also .

      The Americans knew the deal & it gave several swimmers the chance to prove themselves in a foreign setting .

  30. Zanna says:
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    Wow!! Jaeger wins the 1500 free! That was unexpected! 14.51.79

    • Jane says:
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      Jaeger must be having a bad meet! ;)

    • jd14 says:
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      Good stuff from Jaeger!! #Jaegerbomb

    • aswimfan says:
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      Jaeger maintained his nationals form, while Cochrane and Horton went much slower than their Commonwealth Games.

      Is there still a discussion that the aussies are targeting PP rather than the Commies? :)

      • HG says:
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        No I think they always knew it was going to be a difficult assignment to do both ( hence qualification standards were higher for PPs) Posters here forget it is the last week of winter here . It is like having 2 high profile meets in February & hanging out for spring break. They are tired.

  31. Zanna says:
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    Beats Cochrane, 14.51.97 and Horton 14.52.78

  32. SwimHistorian says:
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    What people don’t seem to be taking into account is that it’s cold, windy, and rainy. (And site often, the rain can mean that the pool water temperature drops as well.) It’s hard to swim fast under conditions like that, given that it’s much easier to tighten up when cold; some swimmers withstand cold better than others, and what we’re seeing is partly that effect. Also, the Americans evidently arrived in Australia last Thursday, and one week is not enough to completely adjust to the topsy turvy time zone. The heats are going off at 8PM East Coast time, and the finals at 5AM. (I think we saw a little bit of this effect in Irvine, with the finals ending at 11PM East Coast time, which is why so many of the swimmers from the East Coast swam faster in prelims than in finals.)

    Given the circumstances, some of the American performances have been downright heroic, especially Ledecky’s 800 free. The Aussies and Japanese have been closer to their own time zones, but even their performances have been hampered by the weather.

    Anyway, any comparisons between the Commonwealth Games, Europeans, and Pan Pacs have to take conditions into account. This is not to belittle the first two; there were some spectacular performances there. It’s merely to remind all of the swimmers and ex-swimmers here what it was like when you swam outdoors in cold, windy, rainy weather.

    • aswimfan says:
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      I have a sense that some americans are feeling nervy in this meet as this is the qualification for 2015 Worlds.

      A question:
      any explanation why Pelton and Boostma are regressing significantly?

      • PK says:
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        At some point, someone smarter than myself is going to examine why, outside of Celina Li and Missy’s freestyle, the majority of Cal women have regressed over the past year.

        • Danjohnrob says:
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          Bootsma stated in an interview at Nationals that when she came back from the Olympics she was burned-out and unmotivated. She said Teri has helped her and she’s just starting to enjoy the sport again now.

          A funny thing happened to Franklin outside the pool, it’s called life! She’s adjusting to a myriad of things with her irrepressible positivity; but for example, I’ll bet she’s not eating as well cooking for herself and not sleeping as much studying with her courseload at Cal. Also, now that she’s famous she has obligations to fulfill and autographs to sign. And as somebody stated slready, she’s no longer training/living at altitude. Considering all that, she’s doing great!

          I must admit I never understood Pelton. One thing might be adjusting to changes in her body though, because she used to be willowy and now she looks stronger. I think she’ll be better at the 100 than 200 when Rio Trials come around.

          We need to try to remember all these swimmers are individuals with individual issues, even when they train together!

          • coach says:
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            I don’t think it’s a Cal thing for Pelton. She had a killer year last year at Cal, even making the Worlds team in the 400 free relay (and I don’t think any of us considered her to be a 100 freestyler). I don’t know if this year was as struggle because of new team dynamics, complacency, health, or anything else, but I do know that we see a lot of “sophomore slumps” with regular college kids when the newness of college wears off and the daily grind can take over. She’s a fighter, and this may be the motivation she needed to get back on track.

      • SwimHistorian says:
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        One thing I’ve noticed in the past, and this year particularly, is that whenever there’s a conglomeration of grab swimmers in one training spot, people get all excited about it and you hear, “It’s going to be incredible, these guys are going to push each other to new heights of achievement.”

        We heard a lot of that this year about (a) the Cal backstrokers, with Missy coming on board, and (b), the NBAC program, with all those world class middle distance freestylers training together. Well, what happened? Pelton and Bootsma, as you point out, got slower this year, and Franklin didn’t really improve either. (It’s not fair to judge any of them just from this meet, given the conditions, but none has really showed improvement at any point in 2014. Missy had that excellent 1:40.6 200 yard free at NCAA’s, but in all honesty, it was probably no better than the 1:54.8 200 LCM free with which she won in Barcelona.)

        And what happened at NBAC? We saw what happened to Agnel at Euros. Dwyer hasn’t gotten any faster, Schmitt swam inexplicably poorly in Irvine, Luchsinger got slower, Kalisz really hasn’t improved on last summer’s times, and may be even a touch slower than the equivalent of his NCAA times when he was swimming with Georgia. McLean is swimming okay, and I don’t know enough about Dyer’s long course history to have an opinion there. Runge and Mann have shown solid improvements. And Phelps is showing flashes of brilliance, but he’s sort of in a different category, after having taken a year and a half off and not showing up to all the workouts.

        Explanation? I think the dynamic changes when you have all these top dogs competing against each other in workout day in and day out. By going all out so frequently, they end up effectively overtrained, and they’re flat by the time the big meet rolls around. We saw it in Cal, and we saw it at NBAC.

        This, by the way, is not to blame the coaches. Both Teri McKeever and Bob Bowman have long track records of success. It’s just a function of the nature of getting all these alpha males (or alpha females) in the pool at the same time. In a sense, you could almost say it has a cannibalizing effect. (I suspect the reason that Runge and Mann improved while the men didn’t is that they’re not really competing against that group in practice; I don’t know what happened with Schmitt.)

        • SwimHistorian says:
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          Sorry, typo, that’s “great” not “grab” in the first sentence.

        • Sven says:
          1
          1

          I agree. Most coaches expect to have to pump their swimmers up and make them work harder, but with lanes on lanes of all-stars, sometimes you have to remind them to control themselves.

        • aigues says:
          1
          1

          Being beaten day after day by Franklin can also destroy the self-confidence of anyone. An athlete who works to be the n°1 and trains everyday every day the reason why he or she will never be more than n°2… that must be hard to live.

          • Christopher Smithour says:
            4
            1

            The three don’t necessarily train together. When they were interviewed at Nationals, Bootsma said they were never really put head to head in practice, because they all work on different things. So we can’t really say that them training together is effecting their backstroke performance.

    • Tm says:
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      All very valid points swim historian! This meet after all is a qualifying meet for the us team, it certainly isn’t the Olympics.

    • Danjohnrob says:
      9
      1

      Absolutely!

      I just want to add that backstroke times swum in outdoor pools are often slower. Of course, everybody swam under the same conditions, so no excuses, but Grevers and Franklin stated at Nationals that they never swim as quick times outdoors. Might I add Grevers is from Arizona where it is over 100 degrees 3/4 of the year.

      Lest we forget, Franklin is in PAIN! I would have told her to skip the meet altogether, but she did a tough double this morning, including a backstroke start, which is what caused her injury! I didn’t see her race, but I’ll bet she spotted the field a half body length on the start and still medalled! Very gutsy!

      Dwyer’s time was slow, but not in comparison to Agnel’s time, his Olympic Champ daily training partner! Lochte is recovering from surgery.

      Remember, it’s not all about the stars! McLaughlin and Mann swam lifetime bests! Dirado and Plummer improved their times from Nationals just a few days ago and I’m sure others did too (I don’t have the times
      with me to compare, so I’m not intentionally leaving people out).

      Mostly, I think we’re just annoyed we can’t watch because we’re spoiled, selfish, ugly Americans! ;-)

  33. JD says:
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    For the record. The write up on the Mens 200 free is wrong. Dwyer, Lochte were 4th & 5th not 5th & 6th.

  34. whoknows says:
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    So summary of the day,
    USA 4 gold, Australia 2 gold, Japan 2 gold
    Japan 2 silver, Australia 2 silver, USA 1 silver, Canada 1 silver, New Zealand 1 silver, Brazil 1 silver
    USA 5 bronze, Australia 2 bronze, Canada 1 bronze
    USA 10 total, Australia 6 total, Japan 4 total, Canada 2 total, New Zealand 1 total, Brazil 1 total.

  35. Swimmer24 says:
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    I’m happy that one of the women’s events that people normally complain about for depth and speed (200 fly) was the only event where people stepped up. Three great swims and I think we are finally going to see Hyman/meagher’s times being eclipsed come Rio.

  36. Justin Thompson says:
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    All in all it has to be a bitter sweet day for all the countries. A 1:45.98 winning the 200m Free in the year 2014 isn’t anything we should marvel at and the US mens relay team having 1:46/1:47 swimmers on it wasn’t what they were hoping for.

    Some say it’s a long meet and it’s too early to judge, but go ask Grevers how he feels today about that 53.09 second place finish when he was shooting for a 52 mid and was faster in the prelims. His only chance for Gold that is left is the 50m Back and the 50m stroke events aren’t going to get an Olympic champion too excited.

    With that being said the times overall are slow. It could be the weather it could be that it’s just Pan Pacs, but maybe the Asian games will produce some faster times.

  37. John26 says:
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    How weird is it to think that if there was a global competition this week, the winner of the 200free would be Stepanovic would’ve won in a 1:45high. Then again, I think Park could’ve won this race without a taper and same with Sun.

    If Lochte doesn’t improve significantly, he may not even make the finals

  38. UVa Mama says:
    1
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    I don’t have time right now to read all of the comments, so please forgive me if this has already been covered. In the Women’s 200 Free final, why did so many of our ladies scratch? I am not sure what the scoring format is, but it seemed a little strange. Thanks!

    • TheTroubleWithX says:
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      Short version: only three swimmers per country get finals swims, with no more than two in either the A- or the B-final. (can go 2/1 or 1/2).

    • Danjohnrob says:
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      I’m assuming you’re from the US, but the same rules apply to all the countries participating: a max of 3 swimmers can swim in the finals session from any country (unless there are less than 16 people entered in the race), up to 2 can swim in the Championship Final if that many finish in the top 8 from Prelims, the 3rd must swim in the B or Consolation Final. So, no US swimmers scratched the 200 free final, the others just didn’t qualify for a 2nd swim today. Apparently Sierra Runge scratched prior to today because she didn’t think she could do as well in the 800 free after the 200 Final, but that’s a different story.

  39. swim4fun says:
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    Anybody know the reason for Tom Shield’s DQ?

  40. Dee says:
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    1

    Finally caught up with all this. My conclusions from day 1.. No ‘team’ swimming particularly great, so earlier criticising of the US is unfair for me. Australia and Japan haven’t show much just yet either, as a team – moments of Individual class from swimmers of all the ‘big ‘ countries such as Ledecky, Seebohm and Irie.

    Very Impressed with Connor Jaeger – The 1500m are beginning to bunch in the 14.50s region. 4th-15th in the world split by 9 seconds and all under 15mins – That doesn’t even include Sun Yang. Four Brits & three American’s in that 14.50 region. With that domestic rivalry, I’d hope and expect both countries to have a swimming down in the low 14.40s by the time Rio comes around. Only then would they truly be medal challengers.

    Nice start to the meet – But for me, it’s the wider picture of swimming that’s so exciting. Domestic rivalries appearing all over the world as this ‘new generation’ begins to arrive, hopefully that will only help to push on times and performances… although, we’ve seen before that it can have the opposite effect amongst training partners etc. Depth in certain events internationally is staggering. Good swimming!

  41. Stagnation says:
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    I get that there have been some remarkable improvements at the top in the sport of swimming over the past 10 years, and because of this a culture has been created in which the universal expectation is for endless improvement. However while the overall depth of “great times” (1:45-1:46 200 free, 2:08-2:09 200 breast… etc.) improves, i don’t think its fair to call a meet disappointing if swimmers don’t make it into the “exceptioinal” level at every possible instance. Matt Grevers for example may have “underperformed” with his 53.0, but rather than say “oh what a bummer swim” I believe we should rather accept how exceptional his 52.1 in London was and how rare it is for people to perform on that level rather than thinking of it as something that will become commonplace as the sport “progresses.” .

    The question you have to ask yourself is how much better is Katie Ledecky’s suited 8:11 than Janet Evans’ old school 8:16. What about Popov’s 21.64 with no cap and a speedo? I think what I mean to say here is that I believe that the human limit is being approached for these top athletes, it is only the technology is what skews people towards thinking that the exceptional swims of this era so outweigh the exceptional swims of another. In short we really need to appreciate when athletes put up these remarakable swims, as Katie Ledecky and Sarah Sjoestrom no doubt have this summer, and not rue the performances that don’t meet our fantasy dreamland expectations. For now I have tempered expectations.

    • Thanos Mihas says:
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      that is partly true, but some people have swum faster before and have not be able to reproduce those times for various reasons or have had a natural decline like lochte has had in the 200 free for example.

  42. Mikhail05 says:
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    7

    It’s all bob bowman’s fault. A once truly great coach has failed U.S.A swimming again. Fire him immediately and get some one else.

    • lane 0 says:
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      Becca Mann, Michael Phelps, Frank Dyer, Matt Mclean, Cierra Runge, and Chase Kalisz have all had good seasons so far. And Pan Pacs have just started.

      • don says:
        0
        0

        First, you can only look at the swimmers that have been training at NBAC for six months to a year. Second, Mclean is slower than last summer as is Dwyer, Luchsinger ,and Agnel so not a banner summer for any of them. Third, MP doesn’t do the same yardage (per Bowman/Phelps interviews) so you cant throw him in there.

    • Sven says:
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      I think some sarcasm was missed, here.

      P.S. He didn’t just let USA Swimming down, Agnel and Friis might as well retire too.

  43. swimmm says:
    2
    1

    Under the womens 100 back It says that Emily seebohm’s meet record is still a 59.34 from a previous year when she actually went sub 59 this year at pan pacs

  44. Luigi says:
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    I know I am in no position to criticize other countries’ policies, but I really struggle to understand the logic behind USA’s choice to select swimmers for WCs 1 year in advance

    • Thanos Mihas says:
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      Luigi, this exact policy was used by usa swimming to select the team in the 2010-2011 period and worked very well (as evidence by performances at the 2010 pan pacs and 2011 worlds).

      • aswimfan says:
        0
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        This policy was started in 2006, because the 2007 Worlds was held in March in Australia.
        When 2007 Worlds produced among the greatest, if not the greatest worlds results for the Americans, they kept the policy.

    • Carly says:
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      It really hurts the up-and-coming athletes most by depriving them of the opportunity to compete at the level they’re at by the time the competition rolls around. It’s not hard to imagine a few breakout stars emerging in the next year.

      • Thanos Mihas says:
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        carly, of course the system it has its drawbacks as any system or policy does. the young and upcoming stars could go to pan pac or WUG and be even better by the time omaha comes around in the summer of 2016. but i think it hurts the post collegiate veterans more because they somehow now have to find funding to continue training for another two years or consider getting a job in the “real world” as they say. i am sure some will choose to retire than risk another two years of training and finishing again out of the money in omaha.

        • Luigi says:
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          I share the concerns expressed by Carly. As a swimmer fan, I like to see the best athletes at a given time compete and I hate the idea of not seeing a young star race only because he/she developed late. I understand, on the other hand, that this approach rewards long-term commitment. Still ….

  45. Vivian says:
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    could any of you let me know the channel for Pan pacifics champs. I have verizon carrier. THanks so much

    • Thanos Mihas says:
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      vivian, if you mean tv coverage NBC is televising the meet on tape delay this weekend both on saturday 3:30 p.m EDT and sunday 1:00 p.m EDT. if you mean webcast the heats (prelims) are streamed live on the australia swimming website, however, to my knowledge no one has yet found a link for the finals sessions and believe me we have been trying :( !

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About Troy Gennaro

Troy Gennaro has been swimming competitively since 2003. Troy’s attention to swimming detail has led him to many opportunities in... Read More »